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Full text of "Breeder and Sportsman (1917-1919)"

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VOLUME LXX. No. 1. SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 6, 1917. Subscription— $3.00 Per Year 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6 ,1917 



Pleasanton Driving Park 

PLEASANTON. CALIFORNIA 

offers for service for the season of 1917 the following stallioas: 

THE ANVIL 2.02 3 4 

Fastest trotting stallion ever offered for service in California 
and fifth fastest entire trotter in the world 

Son of .SI. Valiant \'iii<ont (by St. Vincent 2:13',2 out of the triple 

producer Grace Lee 2:29'4 by Klectioneer 125); dam Amy Smith by Emperor 
Wilkes 2:20%, sire of Princess Eulalia (4) 2:09%, etc.; grandam by Hamble- 
lonian 5:<!>. 

The Anvil is regarded by Edward F. Geers as one of the very greatest trot- 
ters that he ha.s ever raced. Kor five years the pair of Tennesseeans went to 
the races toKether .-md in that time were but twice unplaced, while winining a 
total of llftei-n races, includinar the historic M. and M. 

As an individual he is most pleasing, not too large or coarse in any way but 
smoothly and comi)actly made and "all horse" in every line. He Is a perfect 
headed, pure gaited trotter, with the very best of disposition, and is destined 
to become a very great sire of trotting speed. His opportunities in the stud 
have been veiT slight as he has been retired from racing only since the close 
of 1914. lie was selected to head the stud at Pleasanton Driving Park not only 
on account of his great qualities as a race trotter, but because one of his first 
foals. Anvilite (2) 2:22%. with a trial of ten .seconds or more faster, was in 
every way the greatest cult trotter ever handled by C. L. DeRyder. The services 
of The Anvil are recoiiiniended to you without re.'Jerve. 

Fee for THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4, $50 with usual privilege 

Vernon McKinney 2:01 1-2 

Fastest member of the great family of McKinney 2:11 1-4 
Sire of VERNA McKINNEY (2) 2:13 (his first foal raced), fastest two- 
year-old pacing filly of 1915, three-year-old record, 1916, 2:09i4; 
VERNON DIABLO, mat. rec. half mile track 2:14i/4, and DR DYER 
(3) trial 2:121^. 

:-fun of Guy McKinmy .?7r>2.") (by McKinney 2:11U out of Flossie Drais by tiuy 
\\ likes 2:1.'')>4); dam Maud \'ernon by Mount Vernon 2:15V4, sire of the dams of 
Leata J. 2:(i3, etc.; grandam Mag by General McClellan, sire of the dams of 
Mack Mack 2:(tS. etc. 

Vernon McKinney'.? racing career was not an extensive one but will long be 
remembered for the excellence of his performances, as his winnings include a 
Chamber oi Commerce stake in time very near the record for that event at the 
time, and he is the fastest of all the McKinneys. 

He IS 8 hor.se of rare qualities in the way of individual excellence, almost 
Ideal in behavior and temperament in harness or out. Since his retirement he 
has been a popular horse in the stud and our claim that he would prove a very 
peat .sire of pacing speed has been fully substantiated, his first foal to be raced 
being the season champion for the age and gait in 1915, a most excellent testi- 
momal to his potency. Ho is a very sure breeder, his get are uniformly endowed 
with natural speed .^nd tne physical and mental requirements of modern race 
hoi.-es and find nady sale at mi st gratifying price.s. 

Fee for VERNON McKINNEY 2:01 $50 with usual privilege. 

The bi:.-it of car,> taken of 'nares in any manner owners may desire, but no 
respon.sibilily assumed for accidents or escapes. Address for particulars 

PLEASANTON, CAL. 



GEORGE F. RYAN, Superintendent, 




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D. E. NEWELL, Agent, 80 Bayo Vista Ave., OAKLAND, CAL. 



Shoeing' and Balancing 

=_ — _ The =— — = 

Light Harness Horse 

BY JAMES CLARK 

A COPY of this book should be in every horse 
■«» owner's library. It treats the subject in a way 
that you can understand, giving acciu'ate and re- 
liable information that every owner of a good 
liorse will find extremely helpful in the care of 
his horse's feet. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS: 



The Treatment of the Colt's 
Feet Before Shoeing. 

The Firit Set of Shoes. 

Sore Feet and Sour Disposi- 
tion. 

Knee-hitting, Scalping, Etc. 
Pads, their Benefits and 

Abuses. 
Thrush, its cause, treatment 
Punctures. 

Quarter and Toe Cracks. 
Hoof Bound. 
Hitting the Elbows. 



Navicular Trouble. 

Heavy Shoes and Pads in 

the Winter Season. 
Neglected Teeth Make Knee 

hitters and Cross Firers. 
Making the Shoes. 
Extension Shoes. 
Outside ori-swedged Shoes. 
Swedges or Dies. 
Calks and Grabs. 
Bar Shoes Behind. 
Aluminum Shoes. 
The Last Word. 



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THE BREEDER ANO SPORTSMAN 

DRAWER 447, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




MANHATTAN STOCK AND POULTRY 

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ENDORSED BY THE LEADING HORSEMEN 
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Saturday, January 6, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 
(Kstablished 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent. 219 East 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms— One year, $3; six months, $1.75; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
BOc per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN has pur- 
chased the subscription list and good will of the 
Missouri Stockman, which has been discontinued and 
absorbed by the Breeder and Sportsman. The Mis- 
souri Stoclcman was one of the leading journals 
devoted to its special interests published in that 
part of the West. 

Curtis P. ("Jump") Cauthorn, who has been the 
live wire on the Missouri Stockman and to whom 
its success is largely due, has taken an interest In 
the Breeder and Sportsman, and will take an active 
part in the management of the paper and in the 
editorial department. 

Under M.r. Cauthorn's direction the Breeder and 
Sportsman will broaden its scope and will make the 
general livestock breeding and news a prominent 
feature. The acquisition of the business of the Mis- 
souri Stockman, which was published weekly and 
extensively circulated throughout the middle west, 
and more particularly in Missouri, Texas, Nebraska, 
Kansas, and Illinois, added to the circulation of the 
Breeder and Sportsman, will make this paper one of 
the most influential publications in its field in the 
United States and of great value to advertisers who 
are looking for business in the sections covered. 

O : 

A CONFERENCE WILL BE HELD in San Fran- 
cisco on Tuesday, the 16th inst., between as many of 
the secretaries or other representatives of the fair 
and harness racing associations of this State as can 
be induced to attend. The conference has been 
called by Secretary F. W. Kelley, of the Pacific Coast 
Trotting Horse Breeders' Association, and the pur- 
pose of the conference is to see if a circuit of harness 
racing cannot be arranged and dates announced. It 
will be a meeting in which every breeder of light 
harness horses, every owner and every trainer and 
caretaker will be vitally interested. That harness 
racing conducted according to the rules laid down 
by the National and American Trotting Associations 
is the leading American sport is fully attested by 
the statistics of this sort of racing. The number of 
harness race meetings held in the United States 
every year runs up into the thousands, and probably 
twenty thousand horses take part in them. At the 
State and county fairs harness racing is the chief 
amnsement and beyond all question the greatest 
drawing card. California once had a circuit of fairs 
which received State aid and in those days the trot- 
ting and pacing races were the chief attraction. 
Since the State aid was discontinued, a vast major- 
ity of the district agricultural societies have gone 
out of existence, and as a result the race meetings 
have been few. But nearly every year has seen more 
or less racing, and last season, under most unfavor- 
able conditions, no less than nine harness race meet- 
in.gs were given at which the racing was good and 
the attendance fair. It has long been the opinion of 
horsemen, that were the secretaries or other respon- 
sible representatives of the fair and other associa- 
tions promoting harness racing, to get together early 
in the year, select and arrange their dates and if 
possible announce their programs, there would be 
twice as many entries received and a great deal more 
interest manifested than has been the rule under 
the usual haphazard way of arranging a racing cir- 
cuit, by which it was impossible for a horseman to 
know before May or June whether he would have a 
chance to race his horses or not. Consequently a 
movement has been made this season to get repre- 



i-enlatives of the different C^alifornia associations 
losether in January to see if a circuit cannot be 
oriianized and dates selected. The principal thing 
to look after is to see that every delegate to this 
conference comes with the authority that his asso- 
ciation will give a meeting and announce the dates 
on which it will be given. When and where the 
meetings will be held is what the horsemen want 
to know early so that they can commence their train- 
ing work. No association should hold aloof from 
this conference because it feels itself unable to give 
as large purses as the State Fair and the Pacific 
Coast Trotting Horse Breeders hang up. Each asso- 
ciation should give what it can afford and give no 
more. The little but enterprising town of Dixon 
gave a successful meeting last year with $300 purses 
as the rule, and came directly between the big 
Breeders' meeting at Santa Rosa and the State Fair 
at Sacramento, where the purses ranged from $900 
to ^3000. The Breeder and Sportsman hopes to see 
a large attendance at the conference to be held in 
this city on Tuesday, January 16th, as on this con- 
ference will depend the fate of a California circuit 
for 1917. 

o 

The 1!j15 YEAR BOOK issued by the Missouri 
State Board of Agriculture is at hand and is a sump- 
tuous volume of over 600 pages, beautifully illus- 
trated and handsomely printed. In the volume is 
included the 47th annual report of the Missouri State 
Board of Agriculture, which gives much valuable 
information about the resources and the products of 
that great State. Many special articles, written by 
experts, are included in the work. 

o 

COLONEL FRED A. LAWRENCE, an enthusiastic 
lover of horses and a real sportsman, died in New 
York December 24th, aged 83 years. Col. Lawrence 
was a prominent man in horse affairs in the days 
when Budd Doble made Dexter the world's champion 
trotter. The Trotter and Pacer of December 28th 
says: "Personally Col. Lawrence was one of the 
most charming of men, kindly, unassuming, courte- 
ous and punctilious as to honor in 8port as well as 
business. He was dearly loved by all who knew him, 
and we doubt not that, although he had been off the 
stage for some years, there are still many of our 
readers who remember him, and will mourn the loss 
of a tried friend and true sportsman." 

o 

PROPOSED STATE RACING COMMISSION. 

Draft of the Bill That Will Be Introduced in the 
California Legislature by Senator Nealon 
of San Francisco. 



Following is a draft of a bill which will provide a 
racing commission for this State and permit pari- 
mutuel betting on racing. The bill was prepared by 
the Golden Gate Thoroughbred Breeders' Association 
of which Charles W. Clark of San Mateo is president, 
and James C. Nealon, secretary, and the following 
are among the members: E. R, Armsby, George N. 
Armsby, Gordan Armsby, C .B. Alexander, Captain 
John Barneson, Charles Butters, W. P. BoUrn, 
J. Cheever Cowdin, Charles Templeton Crocker, Wil- 
liam H. Crocker, John B. Coleman, F. J. Carolan, 
Walter Dupe'e, M. H. de Young, John Drum, Thomas 
B. Eastland, Herbert Fleishhacker, F. W. Fuller, A. 
B. Flint, J. D. Grant, M. Gunst, W. F. Humphrey, 
Colonel D. C. Jackling, A. K. Macomber, Walter S. 
Martin, Captain J. H. McKettrick, J. R. McKenzie, 
Andrew G. McCarthy, Lawrence McCreery, John H. 
Rosseter, R. M. Tobin, J. S. Tobin, J. O. Tobin, W. G. 
Van Pelt, Arthur H. Whitney, James Wood, Harry 
Payne Whitney, Vincent Whitney and others. 

An act to regulate the racing of horses in the State 
of California, ond to establish a State Racing Commis- 
sion, and to define it.s powers and duties, and prescribing 
a penalty for the violation thereof. 

The People of the .State of California do enact as 
foUow.s: — 

Section 1. Any association or corporation formed for 
the purpose of racing and breeding or Improving the 
breed ot horses and conducting races and contests of 
speed between horses shall have the right and power, 
subject to the provisions of this act, to hold one or more 
race meetings in each .year and to hold, maintain and 
conduct horse races at such meetings. At such meetings 
the eorporation or association or the owners of the horses 
engaged m such races, or others who are not i)articipnnts 
in the racing, may contribute purses, prizes, i)rernkims 
or stakes to be contested for; but no person or persons, 
other than the owners of a horse or horses contesting In 
a race shall have any pecuniary interest in a pur.se, prize 
or premium or stakes contested for in such races or be 
entitled to or receive any portion thereof after such races 
shall have been (Inished; and the whole of such purse, 
prine, premium, or stakes shall be allotted in accordance 
wi'h the terms and conditions of such race. 

Section 2. The Racing C^ommlsslon established by thii? 
act shall have the right and power, and It .shall be its 
dut.v to allot periods for the holding of such race meet- 
ings am:.ng the several counties of the State. Such 
race meetings shall not exceed in the aggregate in any 
county sixty days racing in any one year, nor shall any 
meeting continue in any county for more than thirty 
days. Thereafter no other meeting shall be held In such 
county within four months after the conclusion of such 
meeting; provided, however, that such meetings through- 



out the '■Uate shall not exceed in the aggregate 122 days. 

Section 3. No meetings shall be given where book- 
inaiiing is allowed, nor sliall any person, associations or 
corporations furnish to poolrooms or their agents any 
information whatever in regard to racing, or knowingly 
permit to be furnished from any course or premises 
under their control any such information; provided, how- 
ever, that nothing herein cointained .-;hall be held or be 
construed as prohibiting the purchase or sale of com- 
bination or French pools or pari mutuels at such race 
meetings. Any person or persons, associations or cor- 
poration;; who shall conduct any race meetings contrai-y 
to the provisions of this act, or engage in bookmaking 
on horse racing, or furnish or knowingly allow to he 
furnished, any information whatever, to a poolroom or 
poolrooms contrary to this act, are hereby declared to 
be guilty ot a misdemeanor; or any person, association 
or corporation acting or aiding them shall be deemed 
uuilty of a misdemeanor, an<t upon conviction shall be 
lined not less than $500 nor more than $1,000. or be im- 
prisoned in tlie county jail for a period of not less than 
30 days nor more than six months, or by both such line 
.and imprisonment. 

Section 4. No horse races are authorized or shall be 
permitted between sunset and sunrise or on Sundayy. 

Section 5. A State Racing Commission is hereby es- 
tablished to consist of three per.sons to be appointed by 
the Governor within twenty days after this law shall be 
in force. TliC members of the said commission shall hold 
their offices for a term of six years; provided, that the 
Commissioners first appointtd .shall determine by lot, one 
to go out of office at the end of each two years. The 
successor of each commissioner so going out of office 
shall hold office for the full term of six years. 

Section 6. .Such commission shall appoint a secretary 
who shall serve during its pleasure, whose duties it shall 
be tc keep a full and faithful record of its proceedings, 
,anu preserve at its general office all books, maps, docu- 
ments and papers intrusted to Its care, and perform such 
other duties as the commission .shall prescribe. He shall 
be paid a .salaiT to be fixed by the commission at a rate 
not exceeding $1,800 per annum which, together with 
other expenses of the conunisslon shall be paid by the 
racing corporations or associations who shall obtain 
licenses frjm said commission. The commission shall 
biennially make a full report to the Governor of its pro- 
ceedings for the two-year period ending with the first 
day of J.inuary preceding the meeting of the legi-^lature, 
and shall embody therein all suggestions and recom- 
mendations as it shall deem desirable. 

Section 7. Such commission shall have the power to 
prescribe the rules, regulations and conditions under 
which horse races shall be conducted in this State, and 
no races shall be conducted except by an association or 
corporation duly licensed by said commission as herein 
provided. Any association or corporation desiring to 
<>onduct such races may apply to the State Racing Com- 
mi.?sion for a license to do so. The Commission may, in 
its discretion, grant the .same for not to exceed one year, 
and every such license shall contain a condition that all 
races or race meetings conducted thereunder shall be 
subjected to the rules, regulations and conditions from 
time to time prescribed by the Commission, and shall be 
revokable by the Commission for any violation thereof, 
or wherever the continuance of such license shall be 
deemed by the Commission not conducive to the interests 
of legitimate racing. But if said license is refused or 
revoked said Commission .'hall cause its reasons for so 
doing to be written in full in the minute books of said 
Commission, which books shall be open at all times to 
inspection to anyone known to be interested in the breed- 
ing or racing of horses. 

Section 8. Ev.*ry race meeting held or conducted,, ex- 
cept as allowed by this act, is hereby declared to be a 
public nuisance and every person acting o raiding therein 
shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor and punished 
by a tine of not less than $500 nor more than $1,000 for 
each day of such meeting and racing; and a restraining 
order may issue against any proposed, unauthorized race 
meeting at the suit of the State Racing Commission. 

Section 9. The provisions of this act shall not apply 
to race meetings conducted by any State Fair Associa- 
tion, agricultural society, county fair, or any' other asso- 
ciation to whicii state or county aid is given; and no 
such state fair association shall hold a race meeting for 
a period of more than 12 days in any one year; and no 
such agricultural society, county fair, or other as.socia- 
tions to which state or county aid is given shall hold a 
race meeting for a period of more than six days in any 
one year. 

Section 10. Any association or corporation conducting 
horse races in this state, at which combination or French 
pools or pari ciutuels are purchased or sold, shall take 
out such commis.sions from all money received from the 
.sale of such pools as may be prescribed by the State 
Racing Commission, not to exceed 8 per cent, one-fourth 
of which shall be paid by .said associations or corpora- 
tions daily to said State Racing Commission and shall be 
paid by said .State Racing Commission to the State treas- 
urer for the exclusive use and benefit of the State School- 
Fund, it is hereby made the duty of the State Racing 
Commission, and it is hereby granted the power, to in- 
spect the books of any such association or corporation 
and to revoke their license unless the said books are 
fully, accurately and fairly kept. 

Section 11. It shall be unlawful for any person or 
per.sons to bribe, intluence, or have any understanding or 
connivance with any jockey, owner, groom or any one 
connected with any of the stables, horses, racing or 
races at' any race meeting, and anyone violating this 
provision shall be guilty of a felony and upon conviction 
shall be imprisoned in the State prison I or a period of 
not less than thr<?e years nor more than ten years. 
O 

Beautiful holiday numbers have been issued by 
the Chicago Horse Review, American Horse Breeder 
of Boston, Horse World of Buffalo and Western 
Horseman ot Indianapolis. All are extensively illus- 
trated, and contain many statistical tables and spe- 
cial articles of great interest and much value to 
trotting horse breeders. 

<> ♦ ♦ 

What is believed to be the prize porker of all 
prize pigs was brought into Healdsburg, Sonoma 
county, one day last week and sold to a local butcher. 
The squealer brought the sum of $35. It was grown 
by S. Patterson of Alexander Valley, and was a year 
old. It tipped the scales in the butcher shop at SS.") 
pounds. This hog is considered the biggest for its 
age that has ever been brought to that city. 

<$> ♦ ♦ 

Grant Hugh Brown, of Goshen, New York, has 
recently imported the 16-year-old stallion Flotsam by 
that royally bred son of St. Simon, Frusquin, and 
out of the fashionably bred dam The Float. He beat 
Rock Saiid twice as a two-year-old and was quite a 
race horse as a three-year-old, as in the Two Thou- 
sand Guineas he finished second to Rock Sand, while 
Rabelais, tlie famous French race horse and site, was 
third in the race; and in the Derby he ran third to 
Rock Sand and Vincius. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6 ,1917 



Horses and Horsemen 



MEETING CALLED TO ORGANIZE CIRCUIT. 

Secretaries Will Meet in San Francisco January 16th 
to Arrange Dates and Programs. 

It begins to look very much like a good circuit of 
harness racing will be arranged for the season of 
1917 in California. Secretary F. W. Kelley, of the 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Association, 
has received letters from nearly eveiy fair associa- 
tion secretary and track owner in the State replying 
to his call for a conference to agree on dates for the 
meetings of 1917. and they have all agreed that Tues- 
day, January 16th, will be a most convenient ^ate on 
which to hold said meeting, consequently it has been 
called for that date. 

It now remains for every association and track 
owner who desires his town to be a member of the 
California circuit of fairs and race meetings to see 
that the representative who attends this conference 
shall have full power to agree on the dates which the 
delegates may fix for this circuit and to transact 
any other business that may come before the body. 

It is expected that representatives from Salinas, 
San Jose, Pleasanton, Santa Rosa, Dixon, Woodland, 
.Marysville, Sacramento, Stockton, Merced, Modesto, 
Fresno, Hanford, Bakersfield, Riverside, Ventura and 
other places will be present at the conference, and 
if each comes with the authority to act for his asso- 
ciation there will not be any great difficulty in ar- 
ranging a circuit that will be by far the best and the 
largest that California has had in years. 

We desire to impress upon every horse owner as 
well as every owner of livestock that believes in 
county fairs and race meetings that he should sug- 
gest to the directors of the different fair associations 
the importance of having a responsible delegate at 
the conference. 

The conference is going to be held on Tuesday, 
January 16th, and your town should be represented, 
as a circuit will be organized and it your town has 
no delegate present it may be overlooked in the ar- 
rangement of ihe circuit. With a pull all together 
we can have a circuit of fairs that will be a credit 
to the State. So, let every one help as much as he 
can . 

o • 

A Word to County Fair Managers. 

There has never been any unanimity of action 
among the county fair managers in California, and 
to show them how advertising and publicity are man- 
aged by the fair circuits beyond the Rockies, we 
would like to call attention to the following from a 
recent number of a Chicago paper: 

"At the Auditorium Hotel, Chicago, December 9th, 
the day following the annual meeting of the Amer- 
ican Association of Fairs and Expositions, represen- 
tatives of seven of the largest fairs met and organized 
a publicity bureau. The persons who attended the 
meeting were A. L. Sponsler, Kansas State Fair; 
W. H. Stratton, Texas State Fair; I. S. Mahan, Okla- 
homa State Fair; W. J. Gooch, Kentucky State Fair; 
W. R. Hir.srh, Louisiana State Fair; John C. Simp- 
son, Eastern State Agricultural and Industrial Ex- 
position, and Thomas H. Canfleld, Minnesota State 
Fair. 

"Each fair belonging to the bureau is to contribute 
three per cent of its advertising appropriation to 
maintain it, and give counsel in spending the other 
ninety-seven per cent of it. The bureau is to be 
located at the Minnesota State Fair and is to be in 
charge of Ray P. Speer, publicity manager of the 
Minnesota State Fair. 

"The service rendered is to include a thorough 
survey of the advertising policies of all members; 
assistance in making up the 1917 budgets as soon as 
all comparative information has been assembled; the 
preparation of a large part of the publicity matter 
used, including hangers, posters, billboard posters, 
car cards, window cards, newspaper ad designs and 
borders, and similar matter, and the creation of new 
ideas. 

"It is believed that greater efficiency will not only 
result but that economies will be effected which will 
save each member several times as much money each 
year as is needed to pay the expense of maintaining 
the bureau. 

"It is the intention of the seven charter members 
to wage a determined campaign to interest other 
fairs in the bureau. Although no formal application 
has been obtained by any of the seven fairs, it is 
known that several dozen others intend to join as 
soon as the matter can be taken up with the boards 
of managers of the institutions." 

o 

W. W. Percival, who has lived at Independence, 
Oregon, for a great many years, and who was a 
prime mover in all that pertained to good racing in 
that section of the country, passed away December 
24th. Mr. Percival has been in failing health for 
some time and when the cause of illness was finally 
determined it was found to be cancer of the stomach, 
in the death of Mr. Percival the racing interests lost 
a good friend. — [Rural Spirit. 



CIRCUIT MANAGER SUGGESTED. 

Sonoma Driving Club Takes Initiative in Proposing 
That Mr. Joseph Waddell Be Engaged. 



The Sonoma County Driving Club of which Mr. 
L. L. Cannon is president, Henry H. Elliott, treasurer 
and Jack Forsythe, secretary, has sent a circular 
letter to other organizations that may give harness 
races in California this year, suggesting the engage- 
ment of Mr. Joseph Waddell of Baker, Oregon, as 
circuit manager. Mr. Waddell was the manager of 
the Inter-Mountain Circuit of eight meetings last 
year, and every one of those meetings, with one 
exception, was a financial success. At that point a 
rain that continued through the meeting kept the 
gate receipts down so that there was a slight loss. 
The largest list of entries ever received in that sec- 
tion was the result of Mr. Waddell's work, and he 
was an active manager all through the circuit, 
arranging with the railroads for the transportation 
of the horses and attending to all matters that per- 
tained to the racing programs, etc. The circular let- 
ter which the Sonoma County Driving Club has now 
sent to the different fairs and racing organizations 
in California, is as follows: 

"Santa Rosa, Cal., Jan. 2, 1917. 

"Dear Sirs: The president of our Association, 
L. L. Cannon, made a trip through the Inter-Mountain 
Circuit last summer and was most favorably im- 
pressed with the work of the secretary, M. Joseph 
Waddell. 

"The Inter-Mountain, through the work and energy 
of Mr. Waddell, secured the biggest entry list of 
any western circuit in 1916. 

"While Mr. Waddell's services are wanted by the 
Inter-Mountain Circuit, he would like to come to 
California. 

"In conversation with Mr. Cannon, Mr. Waddell 
said he would be willing to come to California and 
work up a circuit, provided he was assured of funds 
sufficient to pay actual expenses while working up 
the meetings. 

"At a meeting of Sonoma County Driving Club it 
was decided to take this matter up with various per- 
sonr, clubs and racing a.ssociations in the State to 
see if the services of some one of Mr. Waddell's 
ability was wanted. 

"This club voted to donate $50.00 for the above 
purpose provided enough other places would fall in 
line to make the proposition feasible. 

"Hoping to have a prompt reply and that 1917 will 
show California's best racing circuit, we are, 
"Sincerely yours, 

L. L. CANNON, President. 
"JACK FORSYTHE, Secretary." 

o 

Kinney de Lopez at Los Angeles. 

Budd Doble, the dean of all trotting horse trainers 
and drivers, who has now retired and is living a life 
of ease and comfort at Los Angeles, was in San 
Francisco during holiday week, having run up for 
a day from San Jose, where he had been visiting 
relatives during the Christmas season. When asked 
about his grand young stallion Kinney de Lopez 2:23, 
he stated that this chestnut son of Kinney Lou 
2:07^ and Betsey Direct by Direct 2:05V^ will make 
the season of 1917 at Agricultural Park, Los Ange- 
les. This will be good news to the breeders in that 
section as this eight-year-old stallion is starting out 
with a record as a sire of early and extreme speed 
that will place him among the leading sires of the 
country if he can be given fair opportunity. Kinney 
de Lopez will never be trained or raced as he re- 
ceived an injury that has caused him to show lame- 
ness when given fast work, but one would never 
think so to see him as he jogs sound and is full of 
vim and go. He had as much speed as any horse 
before his lameness ,and quarters in 30 seconds or 
better seemed easy for him. He has sired only 
about eighteen foals, never having been mated with 
more than twenty-five mares, but the speed shown 
by the few youngsters old enough to train is marvel- 
ous. Edith Carter, a yearling by him, trotted the 
fastest mile trotted by a yearling in 1916. The mile 
was in 2:18V^, and is within three-quarters of a sec- 
ond of the world's record for a yearling filly. Louise 
de Lopez, a two-year-old by him, took a record of 
2:14%, was raced all through the middle west and 
never lost a heat. Then his three-year-old Don de 
Lopez started in thirteen races during 1916, winning 
12 of them and 13170. Another of the get of Kinney 
de Lopez was worked as a two-year-old at San Jose 
and trotted a mile in 2:17*4- These four are about 
the only ones of the get of Kinney de Ixjpez old 
enough to be trained, so his showing is all the more 
remarkable. Kinney de Lopez is one of the most per- 
fectly gaited trotters ever hooked to a sulky. In 
fact, every horseman that has ever seen him in 
action calls his gait perfection. That he has a great 
future as a sire is certain. 

o 

According to latest reports the Hillanddale Farm 
string, to be wintered at Macon, Ga., in charge of 
Trainer John H. Dickerson and his assistant, Harry 
Fleming, will consist of twenty-three head, one of 
the largest W. B. Dickerman has had for many years 
in winter training. Among the record horses are 
Bonington 2:04%; Barbara King 2:07%; Tacita (2) 
2:07%, while the juvenile section is made up of a 
dozen yearlings, four of which are by Bonington and 
will naturally receive the best of attention. 



Two Fastest Stallions in California. 

Pleasanton Stock Farm, Mr. R. J. MacKenzie, 
owner, offers to the trotting and pacing horse breed- 
ers of California this season the services of the fast- 
est trotting and the fastest pacing stallions in the 
State. The Anvil 2:02% is the trotter, and he is 
the fastest horse at that gait ever standing for serv- 
ice on this coast. The Anvil was a great race horse 
in his day — one of the greatest that ever scored for 
the word as his former trainer, Ed Geers, has ex- 
pressed it. This endorsement is enough so far as his 
racing qualities are concerned. That he is a grand 
individual will be admitted by every man that has 
ever seen him. Not a big horse, but like Lee Ax- 
worthy, champion of all trotting stallions, a com- 
pactly made, smooth fellow, of just the right size for 
a race horse and a sire. He was sired by a race 
horse. Sir Valiant Vincent 2:11%, that was by 
another race horse, St. Vincent 2:13%. His dam is 
by Emperor Wilkes, a 2 : 10 sire of the famous Wilkes 
family. The Anvil is bred to race and to sire race 
horses which he will undoubtedly do. His service 
fee will be $.^,0 for the season. 

Vernon McKinney 2:10*^ is the fastest pacing stal- 
lion in service in California, and has the fastest rec- 
ord of any horse now on this coast. He was bred in 
California and all breeders know his history. He 
was also a great race horse and while his campaigns 
were not extensive he got the money — the historic 
Chambf-r ot Commerce being one of the big races 
to his credit. He is by Guy McKinney, one of the 
very best sons of the great McKinney, while his dam 
is from a family of fast ones and great money win- 
ning race horses. He has already proven himself a 
sire as the first of his get to start was the stake 
winner Vema McKinney that took a record of 2:13 
as a two-year-old and 2: 09 "4 as a three-year-old. 
Vernon McKinney's fee will also be $50. 

More facts about the pedigrees and performances 
of these two stallions will be found in the adver- 
tisement which appears in this issue of the Breeder 
and Sportsman. Both horses will be at Pleasanton 
in charge of Geo. Ryan, superintendent of the Pleas- 
anton Stock Farm, and we advise every person who 
has a good mare to breed this year to visit that 
beautiful stock farm and take a look at these cham- 
pions, or write to Mr. Ryan for any information 
wanted. 

The Orloffs and How They Race Them. 

The native Russian Orloff is a wonderful type. 
There are few of them that if trained our way could 
not trot in 2:30. The evolution of the breed should 
convey a lesson to the United States. It has taken 
since the time of Peter the Great to bring the type 
to perfection. The pure bred ones are black or gray 
in color, but when crossed with the American trotter 
or thoroughbred, bays are occasionally seen. None 
of the males are castrated and they are raced till 
twelve years of age, the limit for the mares being 
ten. 

The great interest in harness racing in Russia is 
undoubtedly maintained by the custom of giving 20 
per cent of all the horse's winnings to his breeder. 

Trotters race over a sand-covered asphalt track, 
and they never postpone unless the thermometer 
drops beyond 16 degrees below zero. Sometimes 
there are as many as twenty-two races a day, com- 
mencing at 2 o'clock and continuing till 9. The light- 
ing system is so perfect that there are no shadows. 
Everything goes like clockwork. The timing is done 
by electricity and all finishes are photographed by 
two cameras, which are released by a cord. The 
grandstands are heated, and they have restaurants 
and all other conveniences for patrons. 

No two-year-olds are raced and the three-year-olds 
are only asked to try conclusions in a dash of two- 
thirds of a mile. All races for older horses were 
formerly at two miles, but now about half are at a 
mile. Entrance fee is only 1 per cent, and there are 
no other deductions. Horses are classified according 
to their winnings, and are arranged in groups, the 
slowest being the ninth, which is for those that have 
not won 2,000 roubles. All trots are under the aus- 
pices of the Imperial Trotting Club, which holds 
twelve meetings yearly in centers of population. The 
half-bred can beat the native, and the American 
is the daddy of them all. There are only thirteen 
races open to all, and these are known as Interna- 
tionals. They are of a value of 25,000 roubles or 
more. 

o 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



Mr. C. J. Snyder of Hanford asks for the breeding 
of the stallion Milorod, son of Albenard and a mare 
by Shadeland Onward. Mr. Snyder evidently refers 
to the bay stallion Milord, register No. 35783, foaled 
1900, bred by The Highland Stock Farm, Denver, 
Colorado. He is by Albenard 22249 (son of AUerton 
and Banca by Onward), his dam is Belle Barlow by 
Shadeland Onward 6010, second dam Maud W. by 
Weisbaden 1629, third dam Daisy, pedigree not 
traced. 



Thomas Russell of Milpitas asks what time Mr. 
Barstow's horse paced in at Santa Rosa and on what 
date he left for the east. We suppose he refers to 
All McKinney. This hor.se was given a breeder's 
record of 2:04 at Santa Rosa on Saturday, July 8th, 
1916, and a few days later — we think it was the fol- 
lowing Tuesday — the horse was shipped east. 



Saturday, January 6, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



Thoroughbred Matters 



Successful Sires in United States. 

The chief test of a stallion's merit lies in the per- 
formance not only of his three-year-olds, but of his 
juvenile performers, and from this point of view 
Star Shoot, Ogden, and Ballot, must be regarded as 
the most successful sires of the season in the United 
States, writes an English racing authority, in com- 
menting upon the successful American stallions of 
the year. He says in part: 

"To the end of last month Star Shoot had sired 
no fewer than twenty-five winners of sixty-five races. 
Ogden was responsible for eighteen winners of forty 
races, and Ballot's young stock, or rather nineteen 
of them, had secured a total of thirty-eight. 

"It redounds to the credit of our Island-bred stock 
that both Star Shoot and Ogden were bred in the 
United Kingdom, although Ogden was actually foaled 
in the States, his dam. Oriole, having been sent out 
there after being mated with Kilwarlin. It is curious 
that Star Shoot should year after year take a high 
place — he has been first on several occasions — among 
the leading stallions in the States, whereas his half 
brother, Telescope, which was likewise a successful 
race horse, begot nothing of special note at the stud 
with the exception of the Caste gelding and the 
steeplechaser, Deerstalker. Telescope, however, was 
a descendant of the decaying Beadsman line. 

"Star Shoot is a son of Isinglaf-s, one of the great- 
est sons of Isonomy, the Stirling, or Oxford line of 
Birdcatcner. This is the male line of Eclipse, but 
so, too, was that of Telescope. The latter, however, 
was too much inbred to Eclipse to do good — his 
Herod blood being feminine — unless mated with 
mares exceptionally strong in Herod and Matchen 
blood, whereas Star Shoot's sire had in his make-up 
a plentiful supply of both these necessary strains of 
blood — through his sire, Isonomy, for instance. 

"As to Ballot, he was an excellent race horse, both 
in the United States and here, and as a five-year-old 
in this country he gave ten pounds and a beating to 
the three-year-old Valens in the Select Stakes. It is 
interesting to note that Ballot is by Voter, which was 
by Friar's Balsam, the latter a son of Hermit, whose 
male line in this country is almost extinct, although 
doing well in the United States. 

"It is on the cards that a more recent importation 
into the United States in the shape of Short Grass 
may in due course develop into a stallion of the first 
order, the more particularly as the Bend Or male 
line, of which he is a member, has topped the win- 
ning list in England for the last three years by aid 
of Polymelus. Sol Joel's champion goes back to 
Bend Or via Cyllene and Bona Vista, whereas Short 
Grass, which has proved his worth in handicaps in 
the United States, carrying the colors of Emil Herz, 
is a degree nearer to Bend Or, being by the 1880 
Derby winner's sen, Laveno. There is no doubt that 
Laveno was a magnificently bred horse, for he was 
by Bend Or (1) out of Napoli (1) and both his sire 
and dam were grandchildren of Thormanby. 

"What inbreeding to Thormanby means we have 
seen in quite recent years in the case of The Te- 
trarch, which, except for his habit of striking himself 
when galloping, would doubtless have shown himself 
as «far in front of his peers at three years of age as 
he had done in the course of his brilliant juvenile 
career. On his dam's side Short Grass, which won 
the One Thousand Sovereigns London Cup and other 
good races here, was equally well bred, for his dam. 
Outburst, whose first foal he is, was got by Enthusi- 
ast, son of Sterling and conqueror of Donovan in the 
Two Thousand Guineas, out of Sunburst, by Hackler 
out of Solstice, by Solon. 

"Outburst was also the first foal of her dam, which 
goes back in the female line to The Deformed, by 
Burgundy or Harkaway out of Welfare by Priam. 
As evei-y one knows, Priam was one of the early 
Derby winners that was sent to the United States. 
This was before his daughters, Miss Letty, Industry 
and Crucifiex had won The Oaks three years of out 
four. It might be urged that Priam was chiefly re- 
markable for his good fillies, but he got many win- 
ners in the United States. 

"Short Grass is a really good-looking big horse, 
and his sire Laveno, before him, showed himself 
to be a horse of high class by winning the Jockey 
Club Stakes. In addition to being a brother to that 
good race horse and sire Orvieto, Laveno was brother 
in blood to such good sires as Ormonde, Bona Vista, 
and Martagon." 

o 

A dispatch from London says the Duke of West- 
minster has announced his intention to sell off the 
whole of his blood-stock, horses in training, brood 
mares, foals and yearlings, which has caused general 
legret in racing circles, for no colors are more popu- 
lar than those of the house of Grosvenor. It will 
never be forgotten that from the Eaton paddocks 
came Bend Or, his son Ormonde, Orme. the son of 
Ormonde r.nd Flying Fox, the son of Orme. The 
Duke, who has been on active service with the Ar- 
mored Car Division since the beginning of the war, 
is at present home on sick leave. 



ECLIPSE AS RACER AND AS SIRE. 



[By W. H. E. Wanklyn.] 
It is a popular idea that Eclipse was a great race- 
horse. 

The test of greatness in all speed competitions 
is not governed by a time test, but in the meeting 
and succeeding with the best, and Eclipse's perform- 
ances on the turf were, with one exception, hardly 
such as to impress the follower of racing in the 
present day as being anything out of the ordinary. 

Eclipse was bred by H. R. H. the Duke of Cum- 
berland in 1764, and being foaled during the eclipse 
of that year, was so named. He was by Marske 
from Spilletta by Regulus. Marske was not a great 
racehorse, only starting in three events, none of 
which he won. Eclipse's dam Spilletta only raced 
once, but her claim to fame does not rest with her 
famous son, as she is the foundation mare of the 
family from which Weatherbit, Oxford, Adventurer, 
Scottish Chief, and Prince Charlie descended. At 
the death of the Duke of Cumberland, his stud was 
sold and Eclipse fetched 70 guineas, but Mr. Wild- 
man, a salesman at Smithfleld, arrived just after he 
was knocked down, and protested that the sale had 
started before the advertised time. He was there- 
fore put up again, and Mr. Wildman secured him 
for 7.5 guineas. 

He was two years old at this time, and looked to 
be anything but a bargain: his temper was so bad 
that it was seriously considered whether it would 
not be better to have him gelded. However, he was 
given to a rough rider who added to his income by 
poaching; and after being worked hard all day had 
to assist in the poaching affairs of the evening. This 
treatment did not affect his powers or improve his 
temper very much, but he became sufficiently amen- 
able to start racing as a five-year-old on April 3rd, 
1769, at Epsom in a £50 Plate, two four-mile heats. 
He won both heats easily enough, in fact, he dis- 
tanced his four opponents in the second heat, but 
they were of very inferior class. He next appeared 
at Ascot in a £50 Plate, two-mile heats, his solitary 
opponent, a poor performer, Creme de Barbade, being 
easily beaten in both heats. The King's Prize of 
100 guineas at Winchester, two four-mile heats, in 
June, saw him defeat a field of five, of which Chigger 
was the best of a very inferior lot, and at the same 
meeting, as well as at Salisbury a fortnight later, he 
walked over. On the second day of the latter meet- 
ing a horse named Sulphur and one other were be- 
hind him in the City Free Plate, but Sulphur was 
not as good as Chigger. At Canterbury on July 
25th he walked over for the King's Plate, and at 
Lewes two days later he beat a very poor horse in 
Kingston, winding up the season at Lichfield by 
beating Tardy, who was hardly above a Selling 
Plater. His six-year-old career began at Newmarket 
April Meeting ,when his owner (still Mr. Wildman) 
staked 600 guineas to 400 guineas that he would beat 
Bucephalus, by Regulus, whose two previous starts 
had been wins, but he was of inferior class and no 
use to Eclipse over the Beacon course . At the same 
meeting he won the King's Plate, two four-mile heats, 
from Pensioner, Diana, and Chigger, and at Guild- 
ford, Nottingham and York he walked over for King's 
Plates. At the latter meeting he met Tortoise and 
Bellario in the Great Subscription of £319 10s, and 
this was really his only performance against high- 
class horses. He started three times afterward, two 
were walks over and in the other his only opponent, 
Corsican, was not nearly in the same class. Bel- 
lario and Tortoise were both good horses, but there 
were others better at the time that Eclipse never 
met in Trentham by Sweepstakes, the unbeaten 
Goldfinder by Snap, Gimcrack by Cripple, and Tor- 
toise by Snap. He only started in 18 races, of which 
eight were walks over, and the others were appar- 
ently only exercise canters. As a sire. Eclipse's 
name stands quite by itself, and deservedly so. Dur- 
ing his racing career Mr. Wildman sold a half-share 
in him to Mr. O'Kelly for 650 guineas, the latter sub- 
sequenily buying him right out for another 1000 
guineas, and a veritable gold mine he turned out. 

Compared with Herod and Matchem he did not get 
a large number of successful horses on the turf, but 
this was probably due to the fact that his owner 
kept him more or less exclusively for his own mares 
or those of his friends. Whether this was the case 
or not, from the year 1774 until 1787 Mr. (or rather 
Colonel O'Kelly as he was then), helped himself 
pretty freely to many of the good things at Epsom 
and Newmarket. His success, mainly with the sons 
and daughters of Eclipse, was something phenom- 
enal. Of those raced by O'Kelly, the brothers Mer- 
cury, Jupiter, Volunteer, and Odonis and their sister 
Venus, the brothers Chaunter and Hautboy and their 
sister Scota, the brothers Dungannon and Serjeant, 
the brothers Boudrow and Vertumnus, the brothers 
Clarinet and Serpent, the brothers Soldier and Gun- 
powder, and King Fergus and Young Eclipse, were 
the best. But he had quite as many who were not 
quite up to their standard. Other sons and daugh- 
ters of Eclipse who raced successfully were Pot 8 o's. 
Eagle, and Poor Soldier (brothers to Everlasting), 
Don (juixote and Alexander (brothers), Saltram and 
his sisters Maria and Annette, Alphonso, Giant, Dido, 
Meteor, and Planet. 

The only male lines of Eclipse to survive are those 
of Pot 8 o's and King Fergus, the latter through 
Blacklock to Vedette. Galopin and St. Simon, and 
the former through Whalebone to Camel and Touch- 
stone, and Sir Hercules to Birdcatcher, whose two 
branches, Oxford and The Baron, bring us down to 



Sterling with the former, and Stockwell with the 
latter. The Tramp and Whisker lines are still rep- 
resented mostly on the Continent, but they look 
perilously near extinction. 

Eclipse died early in 1789 at the age of 24, but he 
did not get any important sons or daughters after 21. 
The only son worth mentioning was Clarinet's 
brother Serpent, who was probably the poorest of 
his prominent sons, and left no descendants. At the 
age of 20 he covered the famous Tartar mare, who 
produced more great sons and daughters than any 
other mare in the Stud Book, and she must have 
been at least 28 (it was asserted that she was 36 
years at the time), the result being a daughter. 
Queen Mab, whose descendants are still with us 
producing winners, but there are not many good 
sires, the Derby winner Daniel O'Rourke by Bird- 
catcher being the most prominent. Two other daugh- 
ters, Violet and Bobtail, were got in the same year, 
but their lines did not survive. Queen Mab is 
another instance of old age in the parents not affect- 
ing the productiveness of the female, as she had ten 
sons and six daughters, several of the former being 
good racehorses, but Remembrance is the only one 
of importance to leave descendants, and they were 
females. — [New Zealand Referee. 

Polymelus Leading Sire in England. 

The stallion Polymelus for the third time running 
has wound up the season at the head of the winning 
list of English sires. This is, of course, excellent 
testimony lo his merit as a sire, but by no means 
a record. His paternal ancestor, Stockwell, for ex- 
am.ple, headed the list for three years in succession 
from 1860 to 1862, and subsequently im.proved upon 
that performance by heading the list from 1864 to 
1867, inclusive. But for being relegated to second 
place in 1863 by his old rival, Newminster, which 
beat him by something like £1,500, the mighty chest- 
nut would have had an unbroken sequence extending 
over eight seasons. 

As matters stand the record is held jointly by St. 
Simon and Hermit, each of which figured at the head 
of affairs for seven consecutive years, Hermit from 
1880 to 1886 and St. Simon from 1890 to 1896. In 
earlier days there was annually a keen struggle for 
supremacy among such famous old-time sires as Or- 
lando, Birdcatcher, Touchstone — sire of Orlando — 
and Melbourne. But for the last named the line of 
Matchem would nowadays be extinct, and since his 
time its fortunes to a great extent have hung on the 
slender thread of Barcaldine. The latter, in a brief 
stud career, sired a number of good race horses, 
which, like Barcaldine himself, did well at the stud. 

Among the most prominent of these were Wolf's 
Crag, Winkfield, and Marco. Winkfield did not win 
much on the race course owing to something being 
wrong with his back, but he sited excellent stock, 
among his get being the sensational Cambridgeshiire 
winner, Winkfield's Pride. 

Chaucer, the second on the list of winning sires, 
is a member of the St. Simon family, while Sunstar, 
which comes third, belongs to a branch of Blacklock, 
which is different from St. Simon. Fourth stands 
another descendant of Bend Or in Radium, which 
was one of the 1880 Derby winner's last crop of foals. 

Not a Pleasant Journey for Horses. 

Horses sent across the Atlantic for the war have 
a rather strenuous time of it on the eight weeks' 
voyage. Each horse is put into a narrow stall two 
feet by six inches wide and separated from his neigh- 
bor by two narrow top and bottom slip rails only. 
During the long journey the animal can never lie 
down and is prevented from moving backward or 
forward by the partitions. The wooden floor is re- 
moved for cleansing purposes and to do this effec- 
tually every fifteenth stall is vacant so that twice a 
day they are shifted from right to left while the 
portable parquet is washed over. Grooming in tran- 
sit is never done with a brush, but a soft cloth is 
used instead. Four times a day they are fed and 
watered and ten minutes of walking exercise follows 
after one of the grub seances . After the first day 
out these travelers accommodate themselves to their 
new surroundings and are content. After standing 
three or four weeks the horses become so restless 
and exhausted that it is found necessary to adjust 
a canvas sling beneath their bellies so as to partially 
relieve the strain upon their feet and legs. When 
they land it requires several days for the horses to 
get off their sea legs so as to walk steadily on the 
ground and the most of them seem to be partially 
paralyzed from the constant cramping in close quar- 
ters. 

o 

Handsome is as handsome does, is an old saying. 
By winning the Melbourne Cup, Sasanof, the New 
Zealand three-year-old gelding, scored a marked tri- 
umph over the equine beauties of the turf (says the 
Melbourne Age). In appearance this great little gal- 
loper is a most commonplace sort of fellow. He has 
no good looks to commend him, and when the horses 
filed to the post for the big event he was undoubtedly 
the ugly duckling of the party. "Gee! look at the 
rabbit," exclaimed an overseas visitor as Sasanof 
made his way down the course. As the finishing 
post hove in sight the ragged New Zealand horse 
shot clenr ahead of the field, leaving behind him a 
toiling procession of "beauties in distress." After 
the race he became the hero of the hour. — [N. Z. 
Referee. 



fi 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6 ,1917 



BjHISHgigJBIiglMg >: j: !; :^!^lll)B)llglgl(glBB!lBJBl|KjlSlSll)llEg 

I SADDLE and SHOW HORSES 



afSBiiBiBHigsiBiagKiiKisiiissiiiiaia^ 

Capt. Dilham, the well known riding instructor, is 
conducting a class in riding for both adults and 
children at the old Park Riding Academy on Fulton 
street. 

<$> * 4> 

The Park Riding and Driving Club stables on Sev- 
enth Avenue has a large number of riding classes 
and there are over 1.50 saddle horses quartered in 
this fine building. 

<8> ❖ 

Lady Dilham, once champion of the National Horse 
Show, got the gate at the recent International Horse 
Show in Chicago, with William A. Moore and Robert 
A. Fairbairn judging. The reason given in their re- 
port was, "Too severely bitted." 

<S> <$> ^ 

W. R. Urown, who recently purchased J. A. P. 
Ramsdell's racing pony Mashalla, now has four Arab 
stallions at Waynesboro Farm, Berlin, N. H., where 
he is going to breed pure Arabs . The others are 
Khaled, a chestnut, 1,5.3 hands high; Abu Zeyel, a 
chestnut, 15.1 hands, and Jerrede, a bay, 15 hands. 
Mashalla is IS. 2 hands. 

<S> « 

Geo. A. King.=!ley of Minneapolis, Minn., who owns 
several fine saddle horses, was an interested visitor 
at The International. Mr. Kingsley, who is an attor- 
ney, attends the horse sales of Missouri and Ken- 
tucky regularly and has achieved the reputation of 
being able to pick the winners. 

<S> <J> <S> 

John K. Branch, of Richmond, Va., paid $3,025 at 
auction for the Clydesdale mare Osco Darling during 
the recent International Horse Show in Chicago. He 
also purchased for .$1,550 the six-year-old stallion 
Fairholme Warrior and presented him to the Gover- 
nor of Virginia for use in the stud at one of the 
State agricultural schools. 

The Paik Riding Academy has been removed to 
the splendidly appointed Hulda Stables at 1530 Fell 
street, just west ot Baker street, San Francisco, and 
right opposite- the panhandle entrance to Golden Gate 
Park. Woodland Hackney Stud, owned by Mr. Edgar 
J. Depue, will also make its city headquarters there 
and now has on hand a few high class saddle horses 
for sale. 

<» ❖ ^ 

D. Schilling, who recently purchased the Missouri 
saddle stallion. Noble Rex, will exhibit him at the 
National Western Horse Show, at Denver, January 
12 to 22. Noble Rex is now in the stable of Blades 
& Holnim, Holliday, Mo., where he is receiving the 
attention of that experienced trainer, Dell Holman, 
and well informed horsemen who have seen him 
work declare Noble Rex is destined to be one of the 
best studs brought out in recent years. Mr. Schilling 
bought him for his ranch, the J. O. D. at Aroya. 
Colo., but it is understood that he has about decided 
to keep him in Missouri and have him exhibited in 
stallion classes in 1917. 

❖ <S> 

One of the most interested spectators at the recent 
International Show was William Wallace, of Phila- 
delphia, who recently purchased Jump Cauthorn's 
stallion, Marshall Chief. This was the first oppor- 
tunity Mr. WallHce had of seeing his horse and he 
was delightfully surprised. In a letter to the writer, 
Mr Wallace makes the following comment on the 
Milwaukee Charity Horse Show, which was con- 
ducted by lhat popular sportsman and horse lover, 
Hans Berg: "The show was a wonderful success. 
Marshall Chief was exhibited in the five gaited class 
by 'Splint' liarnett, and made a brilliant and perfect 
showing. I think he was the most admired horse at 
the show and in addition to the cUampionship ribbon, 
won a beautiful vase, presented by Mr. Chas. F. 
Preister." 

«> ❖ ❖ 

The well kno-vn breeder of saddle horses, French 
Field, of Mexico, Mo., should be justly proud of the 
recognition of the sensational three-gaited mare, 
Pretty Baby, which the Lexington, Ky.. horseman 
Hugh Willoughby sold this week. Fields has always 
declared this mare would be a winner, and when 
Willoughby told him when he bought her last spring 
not to publish the price, for he was ashamed for 
anyone to know he would go so high for a green 
one. Fields offered to bet him he would have won a 
championship and given her a big selling before a 
year. Willoughby did both. 

❖ ^ ❖ 

R\ifus Jackson, who is known throughout the land 
as one of the most instructive and capable writers 
on saddle horse affairs, will not be out of touch 
with the saddle horse lovers of this country, and will 
conduct a column of reliable news of Missouri and 
Kentucky in the Breeder and Sportsman. Mr. Jack- 
son is one of the most influential men in public life 
in Missouri, and is responsible for most of the repu- 
tation Missouri has achieved as the leading saddle 
horse state. He is furnishing this news as an accom- 
modation to the publishers, realizing that at the same 
time he is continuing in his endeavors to keep the 
Missouri saddle horse industry in the lead. 



The Milwaukee Charity Horse Show. 

Probably the best horse show, in point of attend- 
ance, in the showing of fine horses, in the receipts 
and in the general interest shown, was given in the 
Milwaukee Auditorium December 21. It is estimated 
that $5,000 was turned over to the Milwaukee Chil- 
dren's hospital as a result of the activity of the pro- 
moter Hans Berg, the women of the hospital, and of 
the participants in the various classes, the members 
of the Milwaukee Riding and Washington Park Driv- 
ing clubs. Ira G. Sharp of Sharpsburg, 111., was the 
judge. 

Milwaukee society, a kaleidoscope of shimmering 
twentieth century colors, the bare shoulders of 
women, white shirt front, silk hats and walking 
sticks, formed a brilliant circle around the center of 
activities. 

Among the horses, Marshall Chief, a handsome 
black stallion, entered in the five gaited saddle class 
by William Wallace, was one of the sensations of 
the performance. He has won purses ranging from 
$500 to $2,500. 

Miss Isabel Earling rode her mare, Juanita, who 
was entered in the five gaited saddle class, winning 
third place. 

Mrs. William Woods Plankinton, driving Satire, 
formerly ot the W'ild Rose farm, won the silver cup 
presented by the board of directors of the children's 
hospital in the single harness horses' class. Mrs. 
Plankinton, smartly costumed in brown, drove like an 
expert. Sunny Jim, Miss Lorraine Freuler's roan 
gelding, won fourth place in the event, in which he 
was driven by his young mistress. 

The Admiral and Silver Piece, owned by Ferdinand 
Schlesinger. won second and third places in the 
event for single harness horses. 

One of the prettiest events of the evening occurred 
when Fred Pabst drove out with his coach and four. 
His passengers were a group of daintily clad young 
society .girls— mostly debutantes. They were the 
Misses Gertrude Marker, Edith Thompson, Ix)uise 
Schneider, Margaret Forsyth, Marian Russell, Con- 
stance Miller, Josephine Dyer, Eliot Smith and Edith 
Courteen. 

As in former years, horses from the Pabst stock 
farm at Oconomowoc carried away many of the 
prizes and were displayed to great advantage when 
driven by Mr. Pabst himself. Their rivals this year, 
who really acquitted themselves with great honor, 
were entries from the stables of Ferdinand Schles- 
inger, who has purchased a number of new horses 
the last year. 

Parson, a fine grey gelding, owned and ridden by 
Michael Cudahy, won first place in the jumping 
event, however, the entries from Woodin farm com- 
ing in second, third and fourth. 

Miss Ernestine Blatz, mounted on Diamond, won 
a silver cup in the ribbon chase, which was ridden 
by nine gir^s, led by Carl Wiesel, and which elicited 
frequent bursts of applai'se. 

In the three gaited saddle class, Mrs. Hans Berg's 
Beachwood won first place from thirteen other 
aspirants. 

California Girl Used Her Riding Crop. 

'You recall," the story teller said, "the row that 
was raised over the alleged lack of police protection 
during the woman's suffrage parade on Pennsylvania 
Avenue, Washington, the day before the Wilson 
inauguration. A Miss Kent was in the mounted 
troop of that parade. As she was about to mount 
her horse in front of the Kent home, her father, an 
M. C. from California, returning from a trip iover the 
route of the parade, noticed that his daughter carried 
a light crop. He gave her a heavier one, saying, 'If 
you need a crop at all you'll need a heavy one.' 

"You remember how the hoodlums annoyed the 
paraders, and would have broken up the march en- 
tirely had it not been for the work of a few of the 
young women riders. Among them was Miss Kent, 
who handled her horse with the skill of a New Y^ork 
mounted cop in pushing back the roughs who were 
trying to manhandle the marchers. 

"At one point a hoodlum darted from the sidewalk 
jeering at Miss Kent, who whea she saw him coming 
raised her crop over her head. But the hoodlum 
didn't know that the rider he had selected to bait 
was famous even among California women tennis 
players for her terrific drives. He pinched her booted 
leg and then fell back shrieking with a bleeding 
welt across his lace. 

" 'Y ou say it was a slip of a girl with a riding 
crop?' the ambulance surgeon asked the policeman 
who was giving him operating space on the side- 
walk. 'Some girl, then, for this ruffian will carry 
a scar from the top of his forehead across his mug 
to the end of his chin as long as he lives.' 

"The Kents are a family of notable independence 
of action," concluded the narrator. — [Rider and 
Driver. 



Col. Paul Brown, the millionaire horse lover of 
St. Louis, is now riding the stallion Foss McDonald 
through the St. Louis parks every day. Foss Mc- 
Donald was reported to be a "bad egg" but this 
veteran sportsman has made an ideal pleasure horse 
in the few weeks he has owned him. In a recent 
letter to the writer Col. Brown declared Foss McDon- 
ald the best saddle horse he had owned in many 
days. He is a seal brown, one of the grandest look- 
ers on earth, and those who know Col. Brown can 
imagine what a sight it would be to see them on the 
St. Louis bridle paths these frosty mornings. 



Standing Room Only at the Horse Show. 

Ivanhoe Whitled writes as follows of his efforts to 
attend the great horse show at the International 
Live Stock Exposition at Chicago last mo.nth: 

"But the night horse shows! Really and truly, 
'cross my heart and hope to die' if I ever saw such 
a jam; such a wild, riotous mob as the aggregation 
that besieged the doors each night waiting for the 
show to begin; such a crazy, pushing, toe-tramping 
herd of lunatics, every separate individual obsessed 
with the one central aim and idea of beating some- 
body else to a favorable spot at the ringside. And 
when at 7 p. m. the gates swung back maybe it wasn't 
a stampede. Standing room? It was standing room 
that this giant mob of ticketless humanity was fight- 
ing each other for. About 4 o'clock Wednesday after- 
noon I dropped around to a ticket booth to get a bit 
of pasteboard entitling me to the privilege of a chair 
for the evening show. The booth was deserted by 
the young woman I had noted earlier in the day. The 
wicket was closed and a card announced "Sold Out." 
So I watched the crazy ones fight for standing room, 
meanwhile making a mental reservation to emulate 
the praiseworthy example of the early bird on the 
following day. 

So at noon on Thursday I approached the booth, 
laid down one good iron man and asked for the bit of 
pasteboard. The very blonde lady behind the bars 
smiled sweetly and spoke tersely, 'Sold Out.' 'What 
are those people selling for, then?' I questioned, indi- 
cating the occupants of an adjoining booth. 'For 
Saturday night's show,' she replied; "tonight and to- 
morrow night both sold out." 

W ell, there was only one thing to do — join the 
mad 7 o'clock rush for standing room. 

So early in the evening I edged as far into the 
rapidly growing mob as possible and waited. When 
the gates were opened I got pretty close to the rail 
without very much effort on my part. Several thou- 
sand anxious people in my rear propelled me, insist- 
ently if not quietly to my place. We were packed 
in like California prunes or figs. Between me and 
the rail were two layer.s — thin ones — of humanity- 
At my right was a husky guy; at my left a slip ot 
a girl, who. before the show was over, was squeezed 
until there wasn't even a giggle left in her. Behind 
me a million men and women were pushing and 
pushing. It was hot, beastly hot. I was caught in 
the jam with a heavy coat on. I sweated and swel- 
tered; my collar wilted; the perspiration trickled 
down my legs and soaked my socks. I was packed 
so tight that I couldn't have got out of that overcoat 
on any kind ot a bet, and there was no place to put 
it, anyway. But if misery loves company everybody 
had plenty ot it. The show was long, but I stuck it 
out because 1 couldn't get away." 

Teaching the Rack and Fox-Trot. 

A successful teacher of the saddle horse gaits 
says the best way to teach the rack and tox-trot is 
to first get the colt handy in a snaffle bridle. Above 
all things, teach him to walk properly at the start. 
It has been frequently remarked that a good, flat- 
footed walk is the foundation of all the saddle gaits. 
If the fox-trot is the slow gait which he wishes to 
develop, the colt should be urged out of the walk 
until he takes it. It will probably require much 
patience and much taking back before he knows 
what is wanted. Before teaching the colt to single- 
foot or rack, he should be got used to the double-rein 
bridle. Take his head up pretty high, "jiggle" the 
curb in his mouth, and urge him rather strongly out 
of the walk into a rack. No attempt should be made 
to rack the colt except on smooth, firm footing. It 
may help some if he is shod rather heavy behind 
and light in front. 

Buys Champion Saddle Mare. 

John P. Crozei, of Upland, Pa., has purchased of 
Hugh \\'illoughby the chestnut saddle mare Pretty 
Baby, that went through from the novice class to the 
championship without meeting defeat at the Ken- 
tucky State Fair this year. She is just under 15.2 
hands high and has been looked upon as one of the 
best of her size and typo in Kentucky. She is a 
saddle bred mare, by Grand McDonald out of Martha 
Field, by Aaron Pennington, a thoroughbred race 
horse, and was bred by Frenchdale Farm, Mexico, 
Missouri. Mr. Crozer, who is a wealthy manufac- 
turer of Chester, Pa., will have a strong stable of 
saddle and harness horses out next season. He 
exhibitea Rectina, Lee Chief and Sunflower with 
much success last summer, winning four blue rib- 
bons with one, six with another and eight with the 
other, according to the Horse Show Blue Book. 
Thirty years ago he was a prominent breeder ot 
trotting horses, and a little later the owner of the 
famous high jumper, Filemaker. 

❖ ❖ ❖ 

Lovers of saddle horses are paying considerable 
attention to The Leading Man, a beautiful chestnut 
gelding owned by Langhorne Tabb Anderson of 
Maysville, Ky. In fact, some of the best judges 
believe he will be the most important candidate in 
Kentucky next year. He was only exhibited once 
in 1916— at the Ohio State Fair— and won over the 
"would-be wonders" of the present time. It is under- 
stood Mr. Anderson has refused several offers from 
Eastern men for this gelding, and horse lovers of 
Missouri and Kentucky are congratulating him for 
not doing so. The Leading Man is one ot the kind 
lhat can go out and win several thousand dollars at 
the shows, and his owner knows it. 



Saturday, January 6, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Notes and News 



A California Circuit is incubating. 

<i> --^ <$• 

Representatives of a large number of associations 
and track owners will meet in this city January 16th. 
^ <t> <$> 

It is proposed to arrange a circuit, select dates and 
announce programs and purses. 

^ ❖ * 

A draft of the proposed racing commission bill will 
be found on another page. 

<^ <$> <$> 

Very nearly 100 trotters and pacers are wintering 
at the North Randall track, Ohio. 

^ <!i> ❖ 

An offer of $20,000 has been refused for the cham- 
pion half mile track trotting filly Emma Magowan 
(2) 2:07%. 

And now Jacksonville, Florida, and Peoria, Illinois, 
both want to hold Grand Circuit meetings, and have 
made applications for membership therein. 

«><$><$> 

Lee Bros., of Mexico, Mo., have recently sold sev- 
eral three gaited horses to Godfrey Preece, the New 
Yorker, who has picked so many winners in Missouri. 

It has been figured that the sum of $803,665 has 
been awarded in premiums to breeders and exhib- 
itors at the National Horse Show since its inception 
in 1883. 

Bert Webster, who has given first lessons to as 
many good horses as any trainer in California, is at 
Pleasanton with five head of trotters and pacers that 
he will get ready for the racing season of 1917. 

L. H. Michales, a horseman of Brookside, Ossining, 
New .York, writes the Breeder and Sportsman that 
he contemplates selling out his interests in the Em- 
pire State and locating in California. 

<?> <S> * 

Bob Smith, of Los Angeles, purchased Honey 
Healey 2:08V4 by Zombro at W. G. Durfee's Chicago 
sale and has sent her to Mount Sterling, Kentucky, 
to be bred to J. Malcolm Forbes (4) 2:08. 

Al Thomas is now educating sixty yearlings that 
are to be consigned by Walnut Hall Farm, Lexing- 
ton, Kentucky, to the Midwinter Sale at Madison 
Square Garden in February. The education consists 
in learning to lead fast at the trot. 

❖ ♦ 

C. B. Johnson, of Ogden, reached Pleasanton re- 
cently with four head of trotting bred horses, one a 
good race mare that he will breed to The Anvil 
2:02%. The others are colts and fillies that will be 
put in training. 

The complete racing career of the pacer Billy M. 
2:03%, that died recently, shows that he started in 
69 races, was a winner in 38, second in 12, third in 
18, fourth in two, unplaced in but five. His gross 
winnings were $15,540. 

<S> <S> <$> 

A new departure at the London Hackney Show of 
1917 will be a competition for stallions suitable to 
get artillery and army horses. "High action will not 
be taken into consideration," so the conditions read. 
The exhibition is scheduled for March 6, 7 and 8. 
^ « « 

W. G. Durfee consigned 35 head to the Chicago 
sale. They brought an average of $350 per head. 
Only the sales of horses that brought $200 or over 
were reported in the accounts of the sale sent on 
from Chicago and printed in tho Breeder and Sports- 
man last week. 

<S> <^ ❖ 

The horses of the late M. W. Savage's Intema- 
tional Stock Farm have been sold at private sale 
since the death of that gentleman. Up to the present 
time 165 horses have been sold at an average ot 
$250 each. The ma."iority of the purchases were by 
Minnesota buyers, but 25 states and Canada bought 
horses through correspondence. Louisiana took 16, 
South Carolina 12, New York 9, and Western Canada 
12. The weanlings were in demand and went to 
buyers in all directions. 

Presence and style are characteristics which a 
good many judges seem to overlook, or ignore, while 
the public is sometimes so swayed by them as to 
overlook other essentials. Possibly it was this dif- 
ference between the official and the unofficial point 
of view which caused the spectators in Chicago to 
show their preference for Lady Dilham by continued 
cheering and applause throughout the contest in 
which the judges placed her fourth to Princess 
Sheila, Rillington Nimble and Gypsy Girl. There arc 
not a few harness horses that excel Lady Dilham In 
conformation and that go higher, especially with 
their hocks, but the little mare in her twelve cam- 
paigns has never met one that could take the atten- 
tion of a crowd away from her when she is stepping 
and going at her best, so proudly and daintily does 
she carry herself, and so full of life and spriit does 
she seem to be. 



The Yolo ('ounly l-'air will be held at Woodland 
this year. Tlie Yolo County Farm Bureau directorate 
is already discussing preliminary plans for a fair that 
will be wide in its scope and typical of that section. 
The bureau as an organization will offer four prizes — 
one of $50, one of $25, one of $15 and one of $10— 
for the four exhibits in the order named, which are 
composed of the greatest variety of products exhib- 
ited by one farmer. 

<S> * <8> 

If* a stable has just finished a disastrous campaign 
does the owner quite the game? inquired .lesse Shuft, 
the Kentucky correspondent of the American Sports- 
man. Not by a jugful . He may be a little blue, but 
it is so easy to avail himself of any of a hundred 
and one excuses why his horses failed to connect 
with the bi.g end of the purses, or he just peddles off 
one or two of them and starts out on the hunt for a 
trotter that can win. 

«> <S> <8> 

J. G. Truman, one of the largest importers and 
brec-ders of Shire and Hackney horses in the West, 
was indefinitely suspended as an exhibitor at the 
International Horse Show during the recent exhibi- 
tion in Chicago. He lost his temper when his Hack- 
ney stallion Romping Flash, champion of the last 
National Horse Show in New York, was placed sec- 
ind to John J. Mitchell's Kingfisher, and used offen- 
sivp language to the judges, William H. Moore and 
Robert A. Fairbairn, as he was leaving the ring. 
<S> ❖ ♦ 

The Department of Commerce reports 29,590 horses 
and 15,309 mules exported from the United States in 
the month of October. Their value was $9,719,594. 
In the ten months ended October 31 the number of 
horses exported was 239,894, and the number of 
mules 106,334, making a total of 345,228 head, valued 
at $74,700,433. During the same period last year the 
number of horses was 391,059, and of mules 105,238, 
making a total of 496,297 head, valued at $101,388,- 
938. 

«><$><$> 

The next big trotting horse auction will be the 
Mid-Winter Sale at Madison Square Garden, New 
York. The highest prices ever obtained at this fam- 
ous annual sale were for Baldy McGregor, at $16,000, 
while three other aged horses were sold at $4,000 
or more; Peter Billiken, $5,000; Charley Mitchell, 
$4,500, and Mr Hawthorne, $4,000. The highest- 
priced mares sold in the same sales were Helen 
Hale, $8,000, and Adioo Dillon, $4,500. Only two 
two-year-olds have been sold for $3,000 or over — 
Katv O'Neill, $3,850, and Rose Knight, $3,000. 
<» <$> <S> 

Dick McMahon, after a week's visit in San Fran- 
cisco and Pleasanton, has been spending several 
days in Los Angeles looking over some of the pros- 
pects he has heard about. He will probably take 
three or four back to Libertyville with him from Mr. 
R. J. M'^cKenzie's Pleasanton Stock Farm. Mr. Mc- 
Mahon's injured ankle is giving him a good deal of 
tro'.ible and he expects to ,go to the celebrated Mayo 
Brothers, surgeons at Rochester, Minn., to have an 
operation performed in the spring if the ankle is not 
improved by then. 

<S> <S> ^ 

W. R. Murphy, ot Santa Ana, has moved to Los 
Angeles for the winter and has five head of horses 
at the track there that he is getting ready to race. 
The five are Bellwig Boy by Wiggins out of a mare 
by Bow Bells that looks like a classy trotter; a two- 
year-old by Junior Dan Patch 2:04i^, dam by Roy 
Wilkes 2:06Vi; a two-year-old by Red McK, dam by 
Ignis Fatuus 2:20Vi; a four-year-old by Hal McKin- 
ney 2:06%, and a bay mare by a son of Barondale 
2: 11 'A out of a mare by Atto Rex. All these horses 
are green and have not had any work as yet since 
last summer. 

<S> <S> <?> 

A New York daily quotes Mr. A. H. Cosden, owner 
of The Real Lady (2) 2:04%, and for many years 
one of the best supporters of Grand (Mrcuit racing, 
as opposed to the present system of early-closing 
installment plan purses, usually misnamed stakes, 
and determined to patronize them no more. "If a 
man could reasonably expect," Mr. Cosden is re- 
ported a;-, saying, "to get back what he has to pay 
out in entrance fees, training bills and shipping 
charges, after he has paid for his horses, I wouldn't 
give it up, because I like the sport . But it is too 
one-sided to be enjoyable. Besides, I like colt racing 
better and so I am going in for two- and three-year- 
olds." 

♦ <► «> 

W. S. Harkey, of Gridley, was in town this week 
for a few days' recreation. Mr. Harkey bred the good 
mare Deviletta 2:lfiV4 and .Sutherland & Chadbourne 
now have a two-year-old from her in their string that 
looks like a real good one. He is by The Proof 
2:09% and if there is anything in looks and breed- 
ing he will be an honor to both sire and dam. Mr. 
Harkey, .who is an extensive farnier, lias added a 
herd of 40 milk cows to his farm, and sells his milk 
to the creamery . He sows the most of his acres to 
grain, however, and has a lead mule on one of his 
plow teams that he says is the best jerk line mule in 
the State. This mule is out of a trotting bred mare 
by Moses S. 2:19V2. and no day is too long for him. 
He is kind and gentle, afraid of nothing, yet is up in 
the collar from morning until night, and carries his 
head in the air liki- a show horse. Mr. Harkey also 
has a fine young mule out of Deviletta that he says 
can trot your eye out. 



Mutual Betting Is Popular. 

Kxcejiiini; the bookuu.kers .who lost their occupa- 
tion when the pari-nuituel machines were introduced 
in Kentucky and Maryland, nearly everybody in those 
States seems to be pleased with the mutual s>stem 
of betting. In Maryland, where a very prosperous 
racing season ended in November last the track man- 
agers are enthusiastic. The average daily amount 
at the Laurel and Pimlico fall meetings was consid- 
erably more than $200,000, it is said, and in one day 
at Laurel th(> total was $290,000, while al Pimlico the 
hi;h water mark was $316,000. which stands as a 
record for the Mar\land tracks. 

What the mutuel system means to the tracks is 
readily seen when it is remembered that in the old 
days of book betting there were never more than 
thirty-five bookmakers at Pimlico, and they paid $100 
each for the privilege of operating. This arrange- 
ment limited the income of the track from this 
source to $3,500 a day, whereas it was something 
like $17,000 on the best day of the fall meeting this 
year, with an average of more than $10,000 a day 
for twenty-six days of racing, or approximately 
$300,000 for the year. 

In Canada and Kentucky, as well as in Mar>'land, 
the mutuels are supplanting the bookmakers on all 
running tracks, and their popularity now extends to 
the trotting tracks, machines having been used last 
year at several meetings in the Grand Circuit. At 
Windsor, Ont., which is just across the river from 
the flourishing city of Deiroit, there are now five or 
six running tracks operating the machines, and at 
Montreal a lot more tracks have come into existence 
since the profitable mufuels supplanted the book- 
makf^rs. 

Breeder of Lee Axworthy Buys Peter the Great Colt. 

That son.= of Peter the Great 2:07% will be as 
successful in the stud as the sons of any other trot- 
ting sire in the world is the confident bleief of 
William Bradley, treasurer of the Fiss, Doerr & 
Carroll Horse Company of New York and breeder of 
the chainpion stallion Lee Axworthy 1:58%. Mr. 
Bradley has just backed his opinion in the matter 
by purchasing the grand looking young stallion Little 
Peter 2:22%, by Peter the Great, to put in the stud 
at his Ardmaer Ganu, Raritan, N. J., where Lee 
Axworthy was bred. 

Little Peter belies his name, for he is 15.2 hands 
high and is powerfully as well as finely formed at 
all points. He is four years old, and is a dark, rich 
mahogany bay in color. He was bred by H. B. Clay 
of Paris, Ky., and is cut of Bettie Wiggins, by 
Wiggins 2:191^, son of Aberdeen and sire of many 
crack trotters, including four in the 2:10 list. Nellie 
Totirney 2:21%. the grandam of Little Peter, is the 
dam Of Aunt Molly 2:16Vi and Baron AUerton 2;15V4. 
She was by Baron Wilkes 2:18, the sire of Moko, 
and was out of Belle Medium, one of the best produc- 
ing daughters of Pilot Medium, sire of Peter the 
Great. 

Little Peter's record was made as a three-year-old, 
with very limited training, and in his work at that 
age he trotted in 2: 18 ',4 over a half mile track. 

Probably no other horseman now living has owned 
three such sires as Mr. Bradley owned in Bingen 
2:06%, Todd 2:14% and Guy Axworthy 2:08%, and 
his choice of a son of Peter the Great for stud pur- 
poses is therefore especially significant. Referring 
to the doubts expressed recently by some horsemen 
as to whether Peter the Great is going to breed on, 
Mr, Bradley said recently: 

"Why in the world shouldn't he? He is as great 
a sire as ever lived, and 1 am confident he will breed 
on as well as any of them. If I didn't think so I 
wouldn't have bought Little Peter." 

— — o 

E. B. Jermyn, Mayor of Scranton, Pa., a wealthy 
coal baron, shipiied to Toronto in charge of Trainer 
Jas. Terrell four lu ad of new candidates for the ice. 
Lottie Hall, brown mare, 2:20%, by Walnut Hall, 
dam by Moko, is a trotter, the balance of the siring 
being pacers: Light Silk, chestnut mare, green pacer, 
by Silk Coid. dam Headlight by Dictator Chief, by 
Dictator: Lady Alice, brown mare, 2:19V4. by Joe 
Palchen 2:01 '/4. dam Dower 2:12'/,: Polly Ann, 
brown mare, 2:06'/i. by Alstrath, by Alcyone, dam by 
Wilkes Boy. The four head landed in good shape 
and have all taken to their work nicely. Mr. Jer- 
myn, who will arrive on the opening day of the races 
at Hillcrest I'ark. is a devotee of the haniess horse, 
and keeps his string for the pleasure he derives from 
seeing them race, and as a recreation from the busi- 
ness worries llial naturally beset a man in his posi- 
tion. Mr. Terrill .the trainer, feels sure he has four 
good horses in his string, and if they take to the 
going over ice they will certainly give a good ac- 
count of themselves.— [Trotter and Pacer. 

^ <S> ^ 

Dates for some of the big Western horse shows to 
be held next season in ctonneclion with Sl^te and dis- 
trict fairs have lately been arranged, as follows: 



Des Moines, Iowa Aug. 37-31 

Detroit, MH-higan Sept. 3-7 

Hamline. Minnesota Sept. 3-8 

Indianapolis, Indian Sept. 3-8 

Springfield. Illinois Sept. 10-15 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin Sept. 10-15 

Syracuse, .New York Sept. 10-15 

Louisville, Kentucky Sept. 10-15 

Nashville. Tpnnessee Sept. 24-27 

Sedalia, Missouri Oct. 9-13 

Kansas ('ity, Missouri Oct. 1-6 

Atlanta, Georgia .Oct. 15-20 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6 ,1917 



ROD, GUN AND K£NNEL 



CONDUCTED BY FISHER HUNT 



a 

Steelhead Angling. — Anglers by the sore betook 
themselves to the Russian river over the holidays to 
enjoy the steelhead fishing which is now allowed in 
District Two. 

The limit is two per man per day, but the fish are 
large and a limit catch often means that fisherman 
has from ten to twenty pounds of trout. Reports 
during the week have told of fifteen pound catches 
and of many smaller ones. 

The stream is running freely across the bar and 
the present storm should increase the run of steel- 
head up the river. The fish are quick to find fresh 
water inlets at this time of the year. A freshet, 
which will thoroughly wash out the stream and Tie- 
crease the saltness of the water, should bring an 
increased run of fish. 

Some fishermen will not take fish from this stream 
until after a freshet. They believe that the water of 
the lower reaches of the river is so polluted during 
the summer months, and so saturated with decayed 
redwood, that the fish partake of the flavor of the 
water. 

A number of sportsmen took limits last week, 
among them R. E. LaCoste, Jnc. LaFranchi. Harry 
Lep, E. Snider, E. Foresti, C. M. Morrill, J. C. Par- 
mier, Wm. Kimball, Edward Feranes, Tom Eckert 
and F. V. Ogbum. 

QB 

Boosts Migratory Law. — Washington, D. C. — The 
magnitude and importance of the wild fowl of the 
United States is shown in these plain statements 
of facts given out recently by the Department of 
Agriculture: 

"The State of Maine estimates the annual income 
from its game resources at $13,000,000, of which 
about 5 per cent, or $650,000, can safely be allotted 
to 'he returns from migratory wild fowl. 

"Oregon values the annual returns from its game 
resources at $5,000,000. Of this amount about one 
million dollars may be attributed to migratory wild 
fowl. 

"It is evident that the actual annual returns from 
this source in the several states reach a very large 
amount, and the value of this resource to the nation 
amounts to hundreds of millions of dollars. 

"The benefits of the migratory bird law in conserv- 
ing and increasing the wild life of the country is not 
confined solely to the game birds. This law also 
protects at all times throughout the United States 
our insectivorous birds, which inhabit every state. 

"The bureau of entomology has estimated that 
insect.'! injure agriculture and farm products to the 
amount of $652,000,000 annually. When it is consid- 
ered that insectivorous birds constantly prey upon 
and devour myriads of injurious insects throughout 
the country, the benefit of these birds in maintaining 
the balance of nature and in limiting the increase of 
our insect enemies is of untold value." 

QC 

Talk With Bill Richards. — "The best duck season 
in ten years, that is what I think about it," said Bill 
Richards when asked how brids were going over the 
Suisun marshes this year. 

Bill Richards is one of those sportsmen who has 
mellowed with the game. When you write his name 
you think "Bill" and put down, in parenthesis, "W. 
W.," and as an afterthought add "Richards." He is 
sixty-two. 

"You see," said Bill, as he tilted back and propped 
his feet up on a dwarfed desk stool, "you see, I 
always figured that a man's business was entitled to 
three days a week." 

And then something that Harold C. Bryant once 
remarked became clear. "If I should want to find 
the man who knows most about Suisun marsh I 
should hunt up Bill Richards." And Bryant knows 
a thing or two about birds himself. 

"I began shooting in that marsh in 77," continued 
Richards. "This season is the best that has come 
along in recent years. The reason? Well, I think 
it's this: We had but little rain after the middle of 
Februarv'. It gave the ducks time to nest and rear 
their ducklings without the usual losses. Breeding 
conditions were better all the way through and that 
is what counts. 

"The Federal migratory bird law is another thing 
that I think helps. The good effect of this law is 
going to be felt more as the years go on. 

"We have had good shooting on the marsh. It's 
a sprig camp— that marsh . We've had limit after 
limit. Yes, sir, the best season in ten years." 

% 

Green Lake Club.— The Green Lake Gun Club was 
formed three years ago with ten members, consisting 
then mostly of people in the immediate vicinity of 
Green Lake. In 1915 the membership was pushed up 
to seventy-five. In 1916, realizing the growing needs 
of the club, the officers voted an expenditure for a 
new club house and improvements to their grounds. 
That this work has brought forth its fruits may well 
be evidenced from the fact that the club now consists 
of 120 members in good standing. 



Durin.c the meeting of the Washington State 
Sportsmen's Association held last May, the Green 
Lake Club was awarded the state shoot for 1917, the 
trapshooting classic of the year for the state of 
Washington . Plans are now being formed which 
the club believes will result in bringing together the 
largest number of contestants the state shoot has 
ever drawn. 

A cordial welcome is extended to all to come out 
and get acquainted wit hthe sport that has proved 
so attractive to more than 600,000 sportsmen through- 
out the United States, all being invited to partici- 
pa'e, whether members or not. 

ae 

TALK OF CLOSED SEASONS IN SOUTH. 

Slaughter of Game Is Pointed Out with Thousands 
of Hunters in Field. 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Some drastic action must be 
taken hurriedly if Southern California is to have any 
wild game at all. Last season the killing was ver- 
itable slaughter. Two or three more such and the 
deer will take its place with the stuffed buffalo in 
some museum. 

The automobile and the good roads have brought 
the forests and the waste places where the wild ani- 
mals live within a few minutes' ride of the city 
huntsman's door. It used to be when a man went 
deer hunting, he was gone for a week or a month. 
Now he merely rises at daylight, jumps into his ma- 
chine and is back for work at 9 o'clock with or 
without his deer, depending on his luck 

The result has been that thousands are hunting 
today who did not hunt three years ago. They 
didn't have the time, nor the willingness to rough it, 
nor the hunter's instinct. 

Last year a man stood along the Malibu and count- 
ed the hunters as they passed. Between daylight and 
darkness, 117 went by; 117 hunters passing one 
place in twelve hours — that means that probably a 
thousand were out that day. It means that thou- 
sands were out during the season. No game can 
exist long in the face of mobs like that. 

So the deer and every other wild game is going. 
The sport of the hunt has decreased and the lust to 
kill has increased as the means of access to the for- 
ests have become easier. 

Killing chickens in one's backyard isn't much suc- 
cess as a hunt. The only way anybody can get any 
excitement out of it is seeing how many they can 
kill in an hour or in three shots. The whole object 
with the hunters nowadays is to see how many limits 
they can get and how fast they can get them. That 
is the only sport a man can possibly get when he 
motors to the scene of the hunt in a limousine and 
tramps around in his bedroom slippers. 

Not only have the uneducated army of hunters, the 
spoilers, killed merely for lust's sake, but they have 
killed blindly. Does, fawns and spike bucks lie rot- 
ting in the canyons. 

So great has the killing become, that the animals 
cannot possibly breed as fast as they are killed, or 
even one-half as fast. 

When they are gone, they are gone for all time. 
Streams can be stocked with trout from hatcheries, 
but you cannot restock the forests with deer, no 
more than the plains could be restocked with bison. 

The real hunters of the South, seeing the imminent 
danger, have proposed a closed season for the next 
four years. In that time the fast thinning game 
would have a chance to breed and grow unmolested. 
They should easily more than double. Then the 
bars could be taken down again, probably never as 
far as today, but enough. 

Portland Club. — Dennis J. Holohan, a visitor from 
Burley, Idaho, was high amateur at the Everding 
Park traps of the Portland Gun Club on December 
24th. He tied his father, Peter J. Holohan, a Port- 
land professional, for high honors of the day. Each 
broke 88 per cent of the bluerocks thrown to them. 

Following are the scores recorded: Dennis J. Ho- 
lohan 88. P. J. Holohan* 88, A. W. Strowger 82, C. N. 
Parker 81, Henry R. Everding 80, Homer A. Pollock 
72. Dr. A. J. Brock 70, J. S. Crane 70, John G. Clem- 
son 70, William C. Bristol, with his regular 20-gauge 
gun, 65. 

ac 

Hunting Dog Wears Glasses. — Moultree (Ga.) — 
Fanny, a thoroughbred setter, wears spectacles. She 
was fitted with glasses by an oculist, who found that 
she had astigmatism. 

For years Fanny has been known as one of the 
best hunting dogs in this section. Before the open- 
ing of the quail season this year she went to the 
fields b yherself, and on returning showed evidence 
of bad falls. Fanny could not help falling into 
ditches and running into trees. Then it was dis- 
covered that her eyes had become affected. 

It is believed that the glasses will correct the 
trouble. At least Fanny now is doing her work as 
well as usual. 



DEFINITE STEPS FOR RATING DOG SHOWS. 

Present Point System For Championship Likely to 
be Abolished by A. K. C. 



New York.— The quarterly meeting of the Amer- 
ican Kennel Club was held last week at headquarters. 
No. 1 Liberty street. Although nothing of a radical 
character resulted, many incidents of significance 
for the future transpired. The meeting, although in 
itself purely routine, indicated that much may be 
expected at the annual meeting to be held in Feb- 
ruary. 

One thing seems certain ,and that is the present 
point system governing ratings for championship 
titles will be dropped overboard. From what one 
could gather, the conferences which have been held 
between the Rules Committee and the License Com- 
mittee have resulted in the conclusion that the pres- 
ent system utterly fails to meet the situation. Fur- 
thermore, the discriminating manner of apportioning 
winners' classes according to breeds will not be pre- 
sented for ratification at the annual meeting. 

The system which seems likely to be pui -uio effect 
is one based on the average number of dogs per 
class. At present it looks as if each breed will sail 
under its own flag. In other words, according to 
the average per class in each breed, so the points 
credited to the winner's class for that particular 
breed. 

In the light that half a loaf is better than no bread, 
such a system must be sweepingly beneficial. Its 
weak spot, however, lies in the fact that breeds in 
which bitches produce large litters have a big advan- 
tage over breeds in which bitches produce two or 
three in a litter. 

Naturally one must take the good with the bad, 
but the writer thinks some consideration should be 
given to the fact that some breeds are more prolific 
than others; also that the young of some breeds are 
much harder to raise to maturity than others. It is 
not numbers alone which count. I have in mind one 
breed so prolific in its producing powers that "the 
market" is flooded with specimens, most of which 
are much below the standard for show purposes. 
Yet because this breed's classes fill well — more for 
dealing purposes than in the hope of winning a prize 
— the road to a championship would be much easier, 
owing to the number of points its excessive "output" 
would give to the winner's class. 

Again, if each breed went off its own bat, shows of 
distinctive importance would lose all that, or one 
might say would lose their identity. 

As regards specialty club shows, however, such a 
system is absolutely necessary. A little coterie can 
get together and under the pretext of holding a spe- 
cialty club show have as many gatherings per annum 
as are necessary for their dogs to become champions. 
An examination of the awards list in the Kennel 
Gazette tor the last year or two will disclose this. 

For shows not confined to a particular breed, how- 
ever, it would, perhaps, be more equitable to take 
the grand average — i. e., if a show gives 100 classes 
and has 500 entries, the average would be five per 
class. 

Whatever may be determined on at the annual 
meeting I would suggest that it be specifically stated 
that dogs entered for "specials" only or "not to com- 
pete in this class," will not be considered as far as 
the rating is concerned. FOX HILLS. 

New Coursing Club. — The California Coursing 
CUib, an organization recently formed around San 
Francisco bay section to revive interest in the 
racing of greyhounds, has determined on January 
14th as the date for the initial meet. It will be run 
off at Sacramento. The members are figuring on 
using the Tanforan race track later on in the year. 
At present the coursing enthusiasts have no park, 
as their place at Ingleside was cut up several years 
ago. 

The Capitol City Club has grounds at Sacramento 
that have been tendered to the local organization. 
R. J. Malcolm is president of the California Club, 
with George Heintz of Oakland, secretary, and John 
H. Rosseter, Roy A. Avery and H. H. Deckleman on 
the executive committee. 

A number of the members are starting to acquire 
greyhounds again. Rosseter recently imported two 
dogs from England and Avery has just received two 
dogs from the East. One of them is Wild Night, that 
divided a sixty-eight and won a sixteen stake in the 
Middle West. 

Snow at Bear Lake. — Heavy snowfall and freezing 
weather has chased out the remainder of the Bear 
Valley ducks and put an end to the sport for the 
season. Gus Knight of Los Angeles has several firm 
convictions regarding the regulation of the fishing 
and shooting which is the chief asset of that beau- 
tiful mountain resort, behind them being his forty 
years' experience of the local conditions. Knight 
thinks all motors should be forbidden in duck hunt- 
ing, and might well add fishing also, but doesn't. The 
veteran thinks the small hook and fine gut system 
of murdering fish should be forbidden by law, this 
being the worst year of trout-wasting by hook-killed 
trout he ever saw, and he strongly advocates pro- 
hibiting all market fishing in Bear Lake. An expert, 
Knight has finally come to advocate strongly all sane 
protective measures as essential if the supply is to 
be kept up against the wonderfully-increasing de- 
mand. 




Saturday, January 6, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



HOW DID MOTHER-LOVE BEGIN? 

ARE ANIMALS' MINDS LIKE MEN'S? 

— — SCIICNTLSTS TAKK 11' Ol KSTluNS AFTEI; (lTI.\(i MI CH STl DY — 



PLENTY OF QUAIL ARE LEFT. 



Season Is Now Over and Conditions Are Favorable 
For Breeding. 

Although the quail have been hunted long and per- 
sistently this season, close observers are rather sur- 
prised at the number that have survived, and the 
present snowfall will prove to those who go forth 
in it that there is at least as big a breeding stock left 
over now as a year ago, ready to take advantage of 
the favorable breeding season which a continuance of 
the present rains assures. 

Upon the big preserved ranches of the Simi Valley, 
more quail are to be seen today than a year ago. 
The bunches range from thirty to fifty individuals, 
and every spring has its following, sometimes a band 
in every little draw. This breaking up of the big 
droves is considered one of the best developments 
possible as inducing a heavy general breeding, the 
birds separating in pairs with the coming of warm 
weather, and repopulating every canyon. 

The Koajntenance of quail shooting in limit possi- 
bility toi I dolose who not only know where to go, but 
how to hunt and can hit when they get there, this 
in face of over 30.000 registered hunting licensees in 
the southern end of the State is one of the most 
encouraging tributes to scientific game law enact- 
ment and administration, quite at variance with the 
usual good sport, drastic prohibition and no-increase 
program exemplified in the East. 

Califomians who study fish and game problems 
feel much encouraged at the uniformly good sport 
of 1915 and 1916, and the idea is growing that the 
Fish and Game Commission should be given power 
to shorten seasons if in its judgment the need should 
develop between two Legislatures, through very bad 
weather, dry winters or other features likely to 
curtail breeding. 

Harn- Sutherland of San Luis Obispo states that 
the quail are more plentiful thereabouts than in 
years: rabbits so pestiferous that farmers are com- 
plaining. Duck shooting near San Luis and west of 
Santa Maria has been very good. The wild pigeons 
are so numerous that upland stock-raisers complain 
because of the acorns they eat, which make such 
choice pork. Traveling sportsmen who have not 
made the acquaintance of this section have over- 
looked good shooting country that is not generally 
appreciated at its true worth. 

ae 

Places For State Shoots. — Thirty-seven State trap- 
shooting associations have selected the cities where 
they will stage the 1917 State championship tourna- 
ments. Here is the list of States and the fortunate 
cities : 

Alabama — Brmingham. Arkansas — Texarkana. Ari- 
zona (not selected). California (not selected, prob- 
ably Del Monte). Connecticut (not selected). Dela- 
ware (not selected). District of Columbia (affiliated 
with Maryland). Florida (not selected). Georgia 
(not selected). Idaho — Twin Falls. Illinois — Strea- 
tor. Indiana — Indianapolis. Iowa — Waterloo. Kan- 
sas — Lamed. Kentucky — Louisville. Louisiana — 
Alexandria. Maine — Rockland. Maryland — Balti- 
more. Massachusetts (not selected). Michigan — 
Birmingham. Minnesota — Brainerd. Mississippi — 
Natchez. Missouri — Springfield. Montana — Anacon- 
da. Nebraska (not selected). Nevada (affiliated 
with California). New Hampshire — Manchester. New 
Jersey (not selected). New Mexico (affiliated with 
Colorado). New York — Syracuse. North Carolina — 
Wilmington. North Dakota — Minot. Ohio — Cedar 
Point. Oklahoma — Tulsa. Oregon — Salem. Penn- 
sylvania — Bradford. Rhode Island (not selected). 
South Carolina — Greenwood. South Dakota — Alexan- 
dria. Tennessee (not selected). Texas — Houston. 
Utah — Oregon. Vermont — Randolph. Virginia — Roa- 
noke. Washington — Seattle. West Virginia — Rich- 
w^ood. Wisconsin — Wausau. Wyoming — Casper. 

ac 

Are You a Sportsman? — Can it be said of you that 
you arc satisfied with a reasonable bag? Does the 
man that comes after you get any of the sport? In 
many localities such sportsmen exist. They are 
interested in the protection and perpetuation of the 
country's game resources. They get what they want, 
but they have conservative wants. They never fire 
a gun at any kind of game if they thought by so 
doing they would injure the prospects for the in- 
crease of that game supply. In some sections wild 
water fowl are exceptionally good this year, the 
increase being attributed to the migratory bird law 
and to gunners who on previous gunning trips only 
shot enough for their actual needs and never more 
than the law limit. 

This could be true of all other game. Don't shoot 
more than you need. Don't shoot just for the sake 
of hitting something. If you feel that way about it, 
go to the nearest gun club and break targets. It's 
a fine sport and you are not killing off or reducing 
chances for future supply, no matter how many clay 
birds you kill. 

Be a considerate sportsman. 

QB 

Swift Killed Near Arbuckle. — A large, almost full- 
grown swift, a cross breed between a coyote and fox, 
was killed by Ernest Sachreiter about eight miles 
east of Arbuckle. The animal had been seen several 
times lately but no one had been able to get near it. 
Sachreiter, on a horse, chased the swift for eight 
or nine miles before it finally became exhausted and 
stopped. 



How did mother-love, self-sacrifice, and intelligence 
come into the world? To help solve such puzzles, 
the scientists are turning to man's cousins, the ani- 
mals. Some of the curious and illuminating results 
are set forth by Dr. S. J. Holmes, Associate Profes- 
sor of Zoology in the I'niversity of California, in his 
book just published, "Studies in Animal Behavior." 

Why do mother-birds go to the trouble of brooding 
over their eggs, and if eggs won't hatch unless they 
are kept warm, where did the first bird come from? — 
this is an old-time puzzle. I'rofossor Holmes's answer 
is that the first bird was not a bird but a reptile. This 
ancestral reptile come up out of the sea to live on 
the land. Thos(> which acquired the habit of guarding 
their eggs had mon- descendants than those which 
did not. As the cold-blooded reptiles in time changed 
into warm-blooded creatures, the habit of lying near 
or ever the eggs while guarding them helped along 
the process of hatching, until finally warm-blooded 
birds developed which must brood over their e.;gs if 
their own kind was to continue. 

The development of parental care was a long, slow 
process. The lowest creatures multiply by just split- 
ting iu two — but even in that there is a beginning of 
altruism and egoism. Among the lower invertebrates 
the young are left to shift for themselves from the 
first. There is an interesting crustacean, Amphithoe, 
which carries her eggs and her young for a few days 
after they hatch out, in a brood-pouch under her body. 
When agile enough, the young creep out and swim 
away, and this mother manifests her fondness for 
her children only by devouring them if she has a 
chance. 

But family life is impossible on a basis of purely 
egoistic behavior, and all autruism grows out from 
the beginnings of parental care. The first manifes- 
tation of parental care is the instincts for finding 
proper surroundings for the eggs — instinct found in 
creatures which will never see their young and could 
not recognize their own offspring. The botfly lays 
its eggs on the hair of the living horse or cow. 
Among certain solitary wasps, the mother digs a 
hole, catches a particular species of insect or spider, 
and deposits an egg in the body of the victim, there- 
by paralyzing it so that it cannot crawl away but 
must remain entombed alive where the wasp has 
buried it. So, when the wasp's egg hatches, her off- 
spring will have living, undecayed fresh meat on 
which to feed. 

The female scorpion displays interest in her young, 
for she tears away the egg membranes to help the 
young escape, and then the tiny scorpions mount on 
their mather's back . She then remains for several 
days in her nest. 

The male Obstetrical Toad of Europe carries the 
eggs of his mate coiled in strings about his hind 
legs imtil the young are ready to hatch. The Run- 
ning Spider, Lycosa, carries her cocoon about with 
her, and when the spiderlings hatch out they cling 
in a squirming mass to her body. 

The alligators guard the spot in the sand where 
they have buried their eggs . The pythons coil about 
their eggs and help them to incubate. It is seldom, 
however that snakes show any such solicitude for 
their eggs, and active care for their young is prac- 
tically absent among reptiles. 

The father is the defender of the family among 
the dogfish and the sticklebacks. The male fish 
builds the nest, remains in it or near it to drive in- 
truders away, and for several weeks after the eggs 
hatch out, swims about with the young fish valiantly 
defending these shrall fry. 

Most insects are indifferent to their young, but 
certain of the solitary ants and solitary bees leave 
an ample provision of food with their eggs so that 
the young may be fed. It is a natural development 
from this beginning to the habit of continuing to 
bring food and of caring for the young larvae. Soci- 
tie^ grow out from the family. The typical insect 



Mayor of Alvarado. — Bill Robinson is the Mayor of 
Alvarado, so the boys say. He lives in a cabin on 
the drawbridge and conducts his tuleborough with 
much more efficiency than a hunter for political 
favor. 

Bill Robinson loaves San Francisco each year with 
th(? opening of the season, and from then until ducks 
are no longer to be shot he ke(>ps his abode on the 
bridge . The Mayor, though he always must walk 
with a crutch, never fails to have game — limits 
mostly. The Mayor doesn't sell his game. It goes 
to his fiiends or is roasted and served to hungry 
parties right in the Mayor's hall. 

Robinson's father was a great hunter, too. He was 
Richard Robinson ,who won distinction as the cham- 
pion wing shot of C^anada. 

9B 

Biggest Hatchery in World. — The Sisson hatchery 
is the largest in the world, according to the report of 
the State l'"ish and Game Commission. 

The hatchery has an annual capacity of .')0,000,000 
trout and salmon fry, and during the last season dis- 
tributed 18,400,000 quinnat salmon and 9,.')97,000 trout 
fry. The hatchery turned out 11,372,000 trout fry 
rnore than could be shipped, this resulting in plans 
for a better distribution system. 

The hatchery has on hand at the present time 



community is an enormous family with but a single 
mother. 

The higher the scale of life, the fewer (he off- 
spring and the greater and longer the care the young 
receive. So develop sympathy, affection, and the 
emotions ot family life. 

The lower birds build only crude nests and hatch 
many young, which are active early in life, but a 
large proportion of the young die. Among the higher 
songbirds, however, few eggs are laid, but those are 
in a well-prepared nest. The young are helpless, 
and so are fed, kept clean, carefully guarded, and 
educated. 

Our monkey cousins show a tenderness little short 
of human, driving away the flies from the monkey 
baby, washing a young one's face in a stream, 
monkey mothers dying of grief over the loss ot their 
young, and other monkeys promptly adopting or- 
phans. 

V\'ith the doctrine of evolution universally accepted 
by scientific men, a particularly active endeavor 
nowadays is to trace the process of evolution of par- 
ticular instincts and of particular mental faculties. 

Explanation of the tropisms of the low<>r creatures 
is made more difficult by the fact that behavior may 
be extremely varied even without the slightest evi- 
dence of intelligence. 

Many lower creatures, however, show the begin- 
nings of intelligence in that they can learn by experi- 
ence. Out of purely instinctive behavior has grown 
a power of associative memory — though there is lit- 
tle ground for believing, thinks Professor Holmes, 
that animals have general ideas or the power of 
deliberate reasoning. They do have, however, ideas 
of a simple sort and a certain power of inference. 
A crayfish can be taught. One crayfish was put in 
a box divided by a partition. If it went to the right, 
it was stopped eventually by a plate glass. If it 
went to the left, it found an open passage to a tank 
of water. In the first ten trials the crayfish took 
the wrong road as often as the correct one. In the 
next ten trials the percentage of correct choice in- 
creased. Finally, the crayfish came to know the 
correct path to the open tank, so that it rarely made 
a mistake. Similar experiments have shown that 
crabs, fishes, and frogs can slowly learn. 

The curious ways in which certain creatures feign 
death has aroused much interest. There is a cater- 
pillar of one of the geometrid moths which clings 
by one end to a twig in such a way that it looks 
exactly like a fork of the twig. Many insects on 
being touched will feign death. Certain crayfishes, 
frogs, lizards, snakes, birds, and mammals by manip- 
ulation may be put into a sort of hypnotic state. In 
large part these feignings of death are not an intelli- 
gent intention, but automatic, and the result of a 
contact-shock. The yoimg terns have a strong in- 
stinct for feigning death. 

"Playin' possum" is proverbial, and foxes will pre- 
tend to be dead and open their eyes surreptitiously 
to see if it is safe to scamper off. In the birds and 
the mammals such feigning of death involves a more 
or less deliberate intention to profit by deception, 
though it is probably not a result of conscious reflec- 
tion, but based on instinct. 

The profoundly important role of sex in evolution 
is pointed out by Professor Holmes. Were it not 
for the necessities of sex, there would be neither 
color nor scent in flowers. 

The processes of wooing and mating have been 
responsible for the sharpening of the senses, the de- 
velopment of strength and acuteness, and the evolu- 
tion of the higher qualities of mind. The vocal appa- 
ratus, for instance, has as its primal purpose the sex 
call . Later came the development of the voice as a 
means of protecting and fostering the young, and 
then the development of speech for social communi- 
cation — and from that the whole development of 
intelligent human society. 



313,204 trout, including 9000 mature rainbow trout, 
«600 Eastern brook trout and 12,650 Loch Leven 
trout. 

Got a Hungry Goat? — Two hundred hungry goats 
are wanted by llie forest service. They must be 
hungry, says W. L. Whiteman of the local office. 

Most ordinary citizens will think that the specifi- 
cations concerning the appetite is superfluous. A 
goat without an appetite is as unthinkable as a burro 
with a pleasant disposition. 

But the Forest Service is quite iu earnest when it 
declares that the goats must be free from stomach 
trouble, have good teeth, and, above all, husky appe- 
tites. 

Eating is to be the ir^ain business of these angorrjs, 
which labor undoubtedly brings a mere goat as close 
to his seventh heaven as he will ever reach. These 
two hundred dyspepsia-free beasties are to be ban- 
queted on the fire breaks of the Angelus forest. They 
are to take the place of brush cutters, who each year 
cleat the growth which springs up on these pro- 
tective trails. 

Th(> service expects to be able to herd the goats 
up and down these clearings and allow them to mow 
the brush before them. It all rests, however, with 
the goats, say the officials. There must be no dieters 
among the two hundred. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6 ,1917 



1^ J-*"*"*,**-*"*"*"*-*-*-*-*"*"***, ••*••»•»••••>••»•«•••••••-••••,< •^••■•••••••>*^ 

♦ t 

; Sportsmen's Row 1 

jj^..,__,_,.^..,_,..,_._,_,..,..,..._,„,..,... ._,.....,_,..,...-,_.„,....,..,_,.2 

President F. M. Newbert of the State Fish and 
Game Commission states that he does not know of 
any bill to be introduced by the committee forbidding 
the use of salmon eggs as bait for trout. "I do not 
wish to go on record in favor or against such a meas- 
ure until I see the bill." says Newbert. "There are 
things in favor of the bait and there are things 
against it. As far as I know the Commission has 
taken no action either way." 

* * * 

Members of the San Francisco Fly Casting Club 
recently elected officers for the new year as follow«r 
President, Frank J. Cooper; first vice-president, F. 
W. Webster; secretary, Paul Shattuck; directors, 
Dr. B. W. Westphal, W. F. Bokart, W. J. Davis Jr., 
Stanley Forbes, Walter Mansfield and J. S. Siebe. 

* * ♦ 

Cards have been received here carrying the an- 
nouncement that the Wilmington, Del., Gun Club, of 
which T. E. Doremus is president, held a shoot on 
December 30 in honor of "Ted," as he is known to 
his many friends. The occasion is the celebration of 
his 29th birthday. Mr. Doremus was recently re- 
elected president of the Interstate Trapshooters' As- 
sociation, which controls organized trapshooting in 
the United States. He is well and favorably known 
here, having been in attendance at the Pacific Coast 
handicap shoot staged at Portland in September. 

* * * 

Canvasback shooting on the mountain lakes 
showed improvement over last year, the feed beds 
at last having caught up with the sudden raise in 
the water levelsin the spring of 1915 further swelled 
last January. The chief food supply of the canvas- 
backs in Crane and Castais lakes is sago pond weed 
(Potaniogeton Pectinatus), but those frequenting 
Bear Lake are drawn by a water smartweed and 
another plant very closely resembling the famed 
"wild celery" or "eel grass" (Vallisneria Spiralis) of 
Chesapeake Bay. 

* * * 

Rabbits appear to be more affected by parasitic 
and other disease than by law, which is the explana- 
tion of conflicting reports, some sections noting a 
decrease even under shorter seasons and the fifteen- 
per-day bag limit, but in general both sage and cot- 
tontail species seem to have held their own or better. 

Awakening to the real value of fishing and hunting 
as assets to the community at large through the in- 
terests built up about these sports has been more 
noticeable during the year just closed than ever 
before and is considered by conservationists as an 
earnest of continuance in the program of wise laws 
well enforced; that there may be more fish to catch 
and more birds to hunt. Even the deer bag showed 
an increase, although admittedly the hardest problem 
with which game lawmakers or their administrators 
have to deal. 

fif * * 

Angling licensees who exercise the privilege in the 
surf attribute the scarcity of their favorite species to 
current changes rather than over-fishing, either sport- 
ing or commercial, as the surf fishes have been given 
protection fo a number of years, and more arrests 
were made .than usual through closer surveillance 
rather than- rreater violation. 

* * * 

Dove hunters enjoyed as good a season as the 
necessarily-delayed opening permits, the famous 
"flights" that used to be so marked a feature of 
Southern California sport being so essentially a fea- 
ture of the breeding period that they must be fore- 
gone if the dove is to be maintained as a game bird 
at all. 

* * * 

The International trapshooting tournament at St. 
Thomas, ;Ont., in December was the biggest ever 
held In Canada. Bob Emslie, the baseball umpire, 
is president of the St. Thomas Association. 

Joe- Bush, a member of the present day Athletics, 
and Chief Bender, a pitcher of the once champion 
Athletics, engaged in a 100 clay target match in 
Camden, N. J., a short time ago and Bush broke 94 
targets to 92 for Bender. 

* * * 

The Minneapolis Athletic Club, the largest and 
strongest social organization of business men in that 
city, has gone in for rifle shooting and trapshooting. 

* * * 

Thirty girls of the State College of Washington are 
given instruction weekly in the use of fire-arms. 

* * * 

Employees of the Twin City Telephone Company 
in Minneapolis and St. Paul. Minn., have formed a 
rifle club. 

* * * 

Trapshooting trade representatives of Missouri, 
Iowa, Wisconsin. Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana and 
Michigan have formed an organization known as the 
Miwikims and an annual tournament on the same 
order as the Westy Hogans will be conducted. 

* !C * 

Thirty-five States allow the killing of deer. 

* * * 

Wyoming is the only State in the Union where the 
big horn sheep may be killed. 



The States — Nevada and Texas — and the Province 
of Manitoba are the only places where antelope may 
be hunted. 

* * * 

Moose may be killed in nearly all of the Canadian 
provinces, and in Wyoming under a special license 
fee of noo. 

* * * 

The United States Government has appropriated 
$300,000 for the destruction of noxious animals in 
the mountains. 

* * 

The Connecticut Fish and Game Association has 
increased its membership more than 500 souls during 
1916. 

* * * 

New Mexico has such a progressive State Associ- 
ation for the protection of game that there are few 
violations there 

* * * 

Elk may be killed in three States — Montana, Wyo- 
ming and Idaho — and in four Canadian provinces — 
Yukon, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Northwest Ter- 
ritory. 

* * * 

Some hunters do not look before they shoot — and 
that is the reason five men were killed in New York 
and fuor in Michigan during the few days of the deer 
season. 

* * * 

Pennsylvania gunners assert that the deer season 
in that State, the first 15 days in December, is too 
late for the comfort and pleasure of the hunters, 
and saj also that the venison is not fit to eat so 
late in the year. 

Hi Iti ^ 

Colusa (Colusa Co.) — The shooting preserves in 
the vicinity of this city have yielded nearly forty 
tons of ducks for visiting hunters. More than 1,000 
hunters, averaging a kill of 25 each, have been in 
Colusa since the opening of the season. This would 
indicate the slaughter of 25.000 ducks, totaling at the 
very least 5.000 pounds or nearly forty tons. These 
figures do not include the number of ducks killed by 
local gunners. 

• • • 

News have been received of the deaths of two of 
the most famous bulldogs in England. Ch. Felton 
Comet, whose winnings ran into four figures and 
who was victor in practically every competition 
worth while, is gone. So is Aquitania. The latter 
had trouble in whelping, and not only succumbed 
herself, but so did a litter of seven puppies. 

* * * 

J. F. W. Moore —"Just wait for me" — has returned 
from a pleasant vacation in the South. The local 
trap shot took in all the sights in Southern Califor- 
nia and crossed over to Tijuana to see the races. 
J. F. W. M. found the hunters busy in getting game, 
and prospects bright for the trapshooting sport. 

* * * 

Hugh Poston has happily recovered from his re- 
cent illness and is up and about again greeting 
friends. 

* * * 

J. A. Chanslor thinks a deal of his little setter. 
Sonoma Girl. The bitch is only eight months old and 
looks like the best bet for the Derby at the next 
trials. Last month Sonoma Girl was just beaten by 
Maggie G. by a margin. 

oe 

Vernon Club. — Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Groat tied for 
the gold bar emblem put up for competition in a 50- 
bird handicap trap shoot Sunday morning by the 
Vernon Gun Club. Both shot from 18 yards and 
broke 48 birds. They shot off at their allotted han- 
dicaps. Groat won. breaking 24x25 and Mrs. Groat 
23x25. The race was closely contested as the scores 
indicate. 

The four beautiful oil paintings, painted by Fred 
Kimble and donated to the club as season prizes, 
were awarded as follows: Stanton A. Bruner, first 
choice of pictures; C. E. Groat, second choice. Sirs. 
C. B. Groat, third choice, and J. W. Meek, fourth 
choice ot pictures. 

The loving cup donated to the club by Mrs. Groat 
was won by William Pugh, the most faithful and 
enthusiastic follower of the trapshooting game in 
Southern California. 

Secretary Stan Bruner announces that another set 
of season trophies will be placed up for competition 
as soon as the game season closes. The clay bird 
season never closes and the followers of this sport 
have that advantage over the field stalkers, being 
able to shoot the year around. Sunday's scores 
follow : Prac- 





Hdcp. 


Total 


tice. 


C. E. Groat 


18 


48 


45 


Mrs. C. E. Groat 


18 


48 


45 


J. D. Dierdoff 


18 


46 


45 




16 


47 


37 




16 


43 


42 




18 


45 


43 


Bob Bole 


18 


39 


41 




16 


47 


42 


Chas. White 


16 




49 




16 




39 




16 




50 




16 




25 




16 




25 



COAST HANDICAP LATE IN MAY. 



Interstate Association Announces Dates and $1300 
Added Money for San Jose. 



Editor "Breeder and Sportsman": 

Please announce to the readers of "Breeder and 
Sportsman" that the Eighteenth Grand American 
Trapshooting Tournament will be held at Chicago, 
Ills., on August 20, 21, 22, 23 and 24, 1917, under the 
auspices ot the South Shore Country Club. There 
will be $4,000 or more added money. The winner of 
first place in the Grand American Handicap will be 
guaranteed $500 and a trophy; the winner of second 
place will be guaranteed $400 and a trophy; the 
winner of third place will be guaranteed $300 and a 
trophy; the winner of fourth place will be guaran- 
teed $200 and a trophy and the winner of fifth place 
will be guaranteed $100 and a trophy. Numerous 
other trophies will also be awarded. 

Also announce that the Twelfth Southern Trap- 
shooting Tournament will be held at Roanoke, Va., 
on May 8, 9. 10. 1917. under the auspices of the Roa- 
noke Gun Club. There will be $1,00 added money. 
The winner of first place in the Southern Handicap 
will be guaranteed $100 and a trophy; the winner of 
second place will be guaranteed $75 and a trophy 
and the winner of third place will be guaranteed $50 
and a trophy. Several other trophies will also be 
awarded. 

The Twelfth Pacific Coast Trapshooting Tourna- 
ment will be held at Sau Jose, Cal., on May 28, 29 
and 30, 1917, under the auspices of the San Jose 
Gun Club. There will be $1,300 added money. The 
winner of first place in the Pacific Coast Handicap 
will be guaranteed $100 and a trophy; the winner of 
second place will be guaranteed $75 and a trophy and 
the winner of third place will be guaranteed $50 and 
a trophy. Several other trophies will also be 
awarded. 

The Eleventh Eastern Trapshooting Tournament 
will be held at Hartford, Conn., on June 20, 21 and 
22, 1917, under the auspices of the Hartford Gun 
Club. There v;ill be $1000 added money. The win- 
ner of first place in the Eastern Handicap will be 
guaranteed $100 and a trophy; the winner of second 
place will be guaranteed $75 and a trophy and the 
winner of third place will be guaranteed $50 and a 
trophy. Several other trophies will also be awarded. 

The Twelfth Western Trapshooting Tournament 
will be held at St. Joseph, Missouri, on July 17, 18 
and 19, 1917. under the auspices of the St. Joseph 
Gun Club. There will be $1000 added money. The 
winner of first place in the Western Handicap will 
be guaranteed $100 and a trophy; the winner of sec- 
ond place will be guaranteed $75 and a trophy and 
the winner of third place will be guaranteed $50 and 
a trophy. Several other trophies will also be 
awarded Yours very truly, 

THE INTERSTATE ASSOCIATION, 

ELMER E. SHANER, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Treasurer and Manager. 

ac 

Oregon Duck Season Over. — The duck hunting sea- 
son, which by the state law closed the last day of 
the year in Multnomah, Columbia. Clatsop and Tilla- 
mook counties of Oregon, has been above the aver- 
age, both in the number of limit bags secured and 
in the quality of the birds- 

This has been due to exceptional weather condi- 
tions, which favored the sportsmen until the cold 
weather of this week arrived. 

Last year was an unusually poor season, especially 
the latter part, when the unusually heavy snow and 
low temperature drove all of the ducks south. Earlier 
in the open season it was very dry along the Colum- 
bia river and on many small lakes in the vicinity of 
which are the favorite haunts of the mallards, teal, 
sprig-tails and widgeons. 

State Game Warden Carl D. Shoemaker said re- 
cently that local sportsmen, as a rule, haven't done 
much protesting on closing the season December 31, 
as demanded by the state law. Heretofore it has 
been the custom to follow the federal statute in this 
respect, which requires the duck season to close on 
January 15th. 

The season opens two weeks earlier in the coun- 
ties mentioned, according to the state law. than It 
does in the rest of the state, and it seems unfair to 
give the sportsmen of these districts a longer shoot- 
ing period than is enjoyed in other sections. 

Mr. Shoemaker is not figuring on putting on any 
additional force of deputy wardens to handle the 
situation in these counties at present, he asserts, 
but will do so later. There are some sportsmen who 
don't believe the ruling is legal, but any person 
caught hunting ducks will be arrested and tried. Mr. 
Shoemaker is confident the statute will be upheld. 

Traps For Yacht Clubs. — William H. Johns, Com- 
modoie of the Bayside Yacht Club, Bayside, Long 
Island, in his annual December report has the follow- 
ing to say about trapshooting: 

"In our trapshooting work 26,326 shots were fired 
during the season, and the interest in this splendid 
winter sport is growing with every year." 

The above seems to express in very few words 
the attitude and feeling of many clubs, not alone gun 
clubs. The sport has made wonderful progress in 
the last few years and is now an important feature 
of many country, golf and yacht clubs. 



Saturday, January 6. 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



HOW TO ORGANIZE A RIFLE CLUB. 



Government Is Anxious to Encourage Men to Become 
Crack Shots and Offers Inducements. 



[By E. C. Grossman.] 

The old gentleman with the striped trousers and 
the white goatee is anxious to see as many Ameri- 
cans shooting the military rifle as possible and to 
that end our I'ncle Samuel has made available the 
purchase of the army New Springfield and the obso- 
lete, but still serviceable, Krag, with ammunition at 
reasonable prices to fit both arms. Reputable civil- 
ians who sincerely desire to perfect themselves in 
rifle shooting, who have good reputations, who have 
organized a rifle club under the rules of the National 
Rifle Association, and who have equipped a military 
rifle shooting range, find their shooting quite reason- 
able in cost through the low prices of the govern- 
ment arms and ammunition sold to such clubs. 

But what the old gentleman does to the grafter 
going into such a club only to get possession of a 
government rifle, and who does not intend to qualify 
as a sharpshooter or expert, is a sin. The sale or 
loan of government rifles to civilian rifle clubs affil- 
iated with the National Rifle Association is just as 
strictly regulated as is the issue of a rifle to a mem- 
ber of the State Militia. Rifles turned over to civilian 
rifle clubs are the property of the clubs, and must 
be ready for inspection at all times by government 
officers who may recall them it they choose. 

They are not the property of individual members 
until such members have qualified as sharpshooters 
over the difficult government course up to 600 yards, 
then after considerable red tape, the rifle is finally 
transferred to the lucky man. Under no circum- 
stances is the rifle the personal property of the civil- 
ian shot until he has complied with the government 
regulations, which require about four months' time 
and some skill, not to mention a completely-equipped 
rifle range, which is also essential before the rifles 
can be purchased. 

The regulations of the War Department say: 

"The sale of arms and equipment is made on the 
condition that they shall remain the property of the 
club, and be retained under its control and subject 
to inspection by officers or agents of the United 
States any time. Rifle clubs are authorized to trans- 
fer title to one arm of a model, purchased by the 
club from the ordnance department, to any member 
of the club who qualifies during the calendar year as 
sharpshooter or expert rifleman, N. R. A. course, 
provided the member has affiliated with the club as 
a member or with the N. R. A. as a member for the 
jiext following year. , 

"Provided, further, that the transfer of title shall 
not be made without the approval of the recorder, 
national board for the promotion of rifle practice in 
the United States. The secretary of the club shall 
make certified report of the qualification and request 
for authority to transfer the property on special form 
for that purpose in triplicate. Two copies of the ap- 
proved request will be returned to the club secre- 
tary, who shall deliver one copy to the member, 
which will be his authority for having the arm and 
stores in his possession." 

In other words the man butting into a rifle club 
with the idea that he can thereby obtain a cheap 
rifle and ammunition finds that he must first qualify 
as sharpshooter over the course, which means mak- 
ing 190x250, at 200 and 300 yards, timed fire, and 
300, 500 and 600 yards slow fire, ten shots per range. 
It may be noted that making these scores with the 
Krag is difficult even for the skilled shot. Then if 
he does qualify, he must pay his dues to the club 
for the next year or send $2 to the N. R. A. for the 
next year, after which his scores and request are 
sent in triplicate to the War Department for author- 
ity to transfer the gun to him. Until that time the 
rifle may be seized at any time by United States offi- 
cers or agents. 

Uncle Sam is generous to those honestly intending 
to make shots of themselves; he is merciless to the 
"rifle and ammunition moochers," who try to take 
advanta.^e of his generosity. Nobody on earth has 
the slightest right to promise government arms and 
ammunition at any price to anybody, the man getting 
them must first demonstrate that he is fit to own 
the rifle, and this means with the arm loaned to 
him, even though he's paid for it, he must qualify 
as stated. 

To organize a government rifle club ten or more 
citizens of the United States foregather and form 
a club, applying for the proper papers to the secre- 
tary. National Rifle Association, D. C. On the papers 
being properly filled out, they are sent to the State 
official for his O. K. and if he is in the least doubt 
as to the honesty of those back of the movement, or 
doubts that the arms are desired for bona-fide rifle 
practice under government restrictions, they are not 
passed. Government arms are too low-priced to take 
chances with the sponger element. 

If the papers pass, then the club is given its char- 
ter, and it must then proceed to build and equip a 
riflo range up to 600 yards, before it can purchase 
the rifles or ammunition, because the requisition 
blank must show the equipment of the club for 
carrying on rifle firing, and it must be so the govern- 
ment course can be fired over it. With this finished, 
then the papers necessary for the purchase of gov- 
ernment rifles are filled out and sent in— not before. 
About six weeks' time then intervenes. 

The government sells to clubs its regular service 



rifle, the Springfield, for $17.37, plus freight, and 
ammunition at 126 per Uiousand. New Krag rifles 
cost $5.56, plus freight, used and very doubtful 
Krags, half worn out, cost about $4, but no rifleman 
intending to qualify buys such an arm. Ammunition 
for the Krag costs $15 per thousand in thousand- 
round lots, plus freight. Being old, it is doubtful in 
accuracy, and the riflemen of the Los Angeles Rifle 
and Revolver Club never use either Krag — old or 
new — because they are s omuch outclassed by the 
new Sprinj-'field. 

If the rifleman has to qualify as sharpshooter, any- 
how, to get legal possession of the rifle, and if he 
really intends to go in to make a shot of himself, it 
pays him to get the present service rifle, the Spring- 
field, as the red tape is no more for this than it is 
for the Krag. The government also loans its Krag 
rifles — second-hand and half worn out — on the put- 
ting up of a bond of $10 for each rifle and paying 
the freight and boxing and making a report of the 
rifles on hand each quarter. Such rifles are loaned 
to civilian clubs- In the proportion of one to every 
ten bona-fide members, and 120 rounds of ammuni- 
tion per man is also issued, which must be expended 
under strict supervision and each shot accounted 
for every three months. 

Riflemen intending to follow the game and make 
real shots of themselves rarely waste much time with 
the Krag, because the man with the Springfield is 
bound to win and nobody likes a licking. The ammu- 
nition tor the Springfield is, after all, not costly, 
25 .vents for ten shots, and it is the best in the world. 

No demon or,:<anizers are necessary to get up rifle 
clubs, merely ten or more honest and reputable citi- 
zens who will guarantee to shoot and who have one 
or two men who are willing to tackle the hard work 
of keeping up the club without compensation. There 
is no way in which anybody can make any money 
handling a government, rifle club, nor would the gov- 
ernment permit it. 

In a city the size of Los Angeles or San Francisco 
there should be a score of civilian rifle clubs and a 
club league, both on the outdoor range and indoors, 
during the rainy season, as in the East. Several 
clubs may band together to fit up a range and use 
it in peace and harmony. There is plenty of room 
for twenty clubs in the city without conflicting with 
one another, and plenty of members to fill them up. 

The officers of the Los Angeles Rifle and Revolver 
Club as the official representatives of the N. R. A. 
in the south, or Col. T. F. Cooke, 631 South Spring 
street, the N. R. A. director for California, are glad 
to aid in the organization of civilian rifle clubs. All 
that is asked is that the men organizing them have 
no financial "graft" in view, which is impossible if 
the club is honestly handled, and that those joining 
them have in mind perfecting themselves in the art 
of rifle shooting, not merely the "grafting" of a gov- 
ernment rifle at the government's generous prices. 
LTncle Sam has put the kibosh on the graft game. 

oe 

Against Net Fishing. — About a week ago a delega- 
tion of 75 business men visited the Bonneville hatch- 
ery, and while there saw millions of chinook salmon 
eggs in the process of incubation. All of these eggs 
were taken from the finest spring run variety of 
Chinook salmon and a good portion of them came 
from the Upper Willamette and McKenzie rivers. 
Fully one-third of the eggs, however, were taken from 
the Umpqua as the amount of eggs received from 
the Willamette river run was not sufficient to fill 
the hatchery troughs. 

The fact that it is necessary to draw on the Ump- 
qua for an additional siTpply of eggs is one of the 
principal reasons why the State Fish and Game Com- 
mission is anxioiis to close the Willimette river to 
all net fishing for salmon, as they realize that if a 
larger portion of the spring run of fish was allowed 
to get over the falls they could depend on a sufficient 
supply of eggs from the Willamette river run each 
year. As matters now stand the number of fish which 
reach the spawning ground depends a great deal on 
water conditions in the Willamette during the month 
of April. 

The main run of spring salmon reaches Oregon 
City about the middle of April, and if water condi- 
tions are normal they ascend the fish ladder and go 
on up stream without any delay. It frequently hap- 
pens, however, that an April freshet will cause a 
three or four-foot rise in the river. This puts such 
an immense volume of water over the falls that the 
salmon are unable to reach the fish ladder, much less 
ascend it. When this happens the fish are forced 
down stream into the wider portion of the river, 
where they can rest in the eddies until the flood 
waters subside. 

The netting season opens May 1st, and if the river 
happ< ns to be at a high stage at that time the net 
fishermen make a huge haul, as they take out most 
of the fish which are gathered in the low reaches of 
the stream and get nearly all of those which come 
up after that date. In 1914 conditions were favor- 
able to the fishermen. They made an immense haul 
the first week in May, and the egg take on the upper 
McKenzie was correspondingly low. In 1915 the 
salmon had a little the b<-st of it, as the water was 
low at the time the net season oi)ened and a good 
take of eggs above the falls resulted. 

Some people are inclined to blame the flah ladder 
when but few salmon get over, but this is not the 
place t oput the blame . A dozen fish ladders would 
not help matters when the river is on one of its 



periodical April freshets. It is simply a physical 
impossibility for any salmon to breast the fearful 
torrent of water which comes over the falls and 
sluices through the fish ladder at that time. When 
the water conditions are at the normal stage salmon 
are frequently seen going over the ladder' at the rate 
of 30 or 40 a minute. 

3e 

Trapshooting Develops Boys. — A new, though log- 
ical, developiiKMU of the sport of trapshooting is the 
forming of "junior" clubs as auxiliaries of trapshoot- 
ing clubs. 

Naturally ,the ranks of the boys' organizations are 
largely recruited from the families of members of 
the senior clubs 

The pioneer in the movement was the Columbus 
(Oliio) Gun Club, and tlie plan worked so s\U'cess- 
fully that many other trapshooting clubs throughout 
the country have adopted the idea. 

Aside from the perfectly naturad desire of the 
average American boy to shoot, there is no sport 
better adapted to the development of manly qualilie? 
than trapshooting. 

Perhaps no other game requires so much or such 
rapid head-work as the breaking of the clay skim- 
ni(;rs. 

An analysis of the apparently simple act of hitting 
the flying target shows that it includes a certain de- 
gree of courage to fire the shot; quick judgment in 
deciding the angle of flight and elevation, the effect 
of wind in deflecting the target from its normal 
course, and equally rapid action in following, lead- 
ing, etc., and firing the charge. 

Steadiness, cool-headedness, nerve, judgment and 
physical control result from regular work at the 
traps. 

8e 

Favor $1.50 Angling License. — At a meeting of the 
Multnomah Anglers' ("lub held December 26th in 
conjunction with a luncheon, the board decided in 
favor of increasing the cost of fishing and hunting 
licenses from $1 to $1.50, which would make the 
combination cost $3. 

The board also expressed the opinion that not more 
than 25 per cent of the cost of the work on steelheads 
at the Bonneville fiish hatchery should be charged 
to the fish and game fund. The bill for the closing 
of the Willimette river to net fishermen was drawn 
and will be presented at the Legislature by Senator 
John Gill. A switch was made in the regular bill 
establishing the deadline at the Hawthorne bridge. 

The following members of the executive committee 
were present: Walter F. Backus, Dr. Earl C. McFar- 
land, John Gill, H. B. Van Duzer, Lester W. Hum- 
phreys, A. E. Burgduff, William M. Umbdenstock, 
Ray C. Winter, W. E. Carlon and Will C. Block. 
William F. Finley, State Biologist, was the only one 
who is not a member of the committee present. 
% 

Trapshooting School. — The Atlantic City (N. J.) 
school of trapshooting — the first of its kind in the 
United States— attracted 5122 persons during the 
period from March 27 to November 18, which, we 
might say, speaking by and large, is quite a crowd. 

'There was some doubt when the trapshooting 
school opened as to whether or not it would be suc- 
cessful. All doubt has been removed. It was clearly 
demonstrated that a school for the instruction of 
trapsliooting was something that was needed. 

Of the 5122 persons who placed tht 12-gauge guns 
to their shoulders and gred at the flying clays over 
the blue waters of the Atlantic Ocean '-om the Mil- 
lion Dollar Pier, 2806 never before hud handled a 
gun. That means there are 2806 more trapshooters 
now than there were when the school opened — for 
there are no backsliders in the "sport alluring." 

Of these novice shooters 2483 were men and 323 
women. This means that of the regular shooters 
there were 2312. Of this number 2264 were men and 
52 were women. 

The number of targets thrown was 249,125. An 
equal number of shells were fired. From every point 
of view the trapshooting school was a success;' So 
much so that the better class of hotels at all the 
winter and summer resorts have added trapshooting 
schools to their establishments. Indications at this 
time are that a public trapshooting school will be 
opened at one of the bathing resorts in Florida either 
this winter or next. The Atlantic City school will 
reopen next March. 

The best score at 100 targets during the season 
was 99 out of 100 by Barton Pardee of Atlantic City. 
The best score by a woman was 90 out of 100, by 
Mrs. B. G. Earle, of New York city. 

Portland Shot Goes East.— Members of the Port- 
land Gun Club had planned a complimentary shoot, 
which was to have been held at the Portland Kun 
(;iub range at Everding Park December 27lh. The 
occasion was in the nature of a farewell to John G. 
CIcmson, newly elected president of the organization. 

Mr Clemson has left for an extended trip East. 
Most of his time will be spent in New York, where 
he will attend the automobile show. It is also pos- 
sible that h(- may be induced to go to Pinehurst, 
North Carolina, to participate in the Mid-Winter 
handicap which will be held there during the eariy 
part of January. 

When the trap shots who were planning to unlim- 
ber their artillery arose and saw the ground covered 
with its mantle of white .they decided that they had 
better let wel lenough alone and not tempt fate by 
taking a chance on shooting. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6 ,1917 



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St 


ock Breeders' Page 


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Bridgford Farm Adds to Herd. 

The Bridgford Company of Knightsen, eastern Con- 
tra Cos! a county, breeders of fine Holstein-Friesian 
cattle and gaited saddle horses, have received from 
New York a car of registered Holsteins containing 
thirty head of h'gh class females, which will be added 
to their present splendid herd. 

The Bridgford Stoclt P'ami is one of the big show 
places of Contra Costa . It is located about five miles 
from Knightsen, on the Bethel Tract. Among the 
lot of new animals are: 

Two heifers sired by King Segis Pontiac Alcartra, 
the 150,000 bull, one out of a 31 pound dam, one out 
of a 19 pound two-year-old who has a 37 pound dam. 
The first six dams of this heifer average over 31 
pounds of butter in seven days, including her owa. 
dam of 19 pounds. 

Three daughters of Spring Farm Pontiac Cornu- 
copia, the $15,000 bull, who is a son of the 44 pound 
cow King Pontiac Pontiac Lass. One of these heifers 
is from a 30 pound dam, one that gave 29 pounds 
and one 27 pounds of butter in seven days. 

Three daughters of Spring Farm King Pontiac, 
who is a 37 pound son of King of the Pontiacs — one 
from a 21 pound dam, one from a 28 pound dam and 
one from a 27 pound. 

Two heifers by King Pontiac Konigen, who is from 
a 37 pound cow and by King of the Pontiacs. 

Six daughters of King Walker 5th, who is a son 
of King Walker and out of Paula of Chagrin Falls 
3rd, who has a record of 30.82 pounds of butter in 
seven days from 751 pounds of milk, milking 10,112 
pounds of milk in 100 days. She was winner in the 
Aged Cow Class at the last National Dairj' Show. 
All of these heifers are out of good A. R. O. dams — 
one with a record above 30 pounds and two above 
29 pounds of butter in seven days. 

One heifer by a 33 pound .son of Pontiac Komdyke. 
This heifer just dropped a nice bull calf by a 34 
pound son of King Segis Pontiac Alcartra. 

Also several good record cows bred to the 44 pound 
bull Spring Farm Pontiac Cornucopia. — [Byron 
Times. 

Ox Warbles Damage Cattle. 

The characteriftic lumps or swellings which may 
be found under the skin on the backs of many cattle 
from January until April contain grubs. If these 
grubs are allowed to remain, they will complete their 
growth, drop to the ground and transform to heel 
tlies which may reinfest the cattle during the spring 
and summer, according to T. J. Talbert of the Uni- 
versity of Missouri College of Agriculture. The grubs 
weaken the cattle, cause them to fall off in flesh and 
milk, and decrease the value of the hide. The beef 
in the immediate vicinity of a grub becomes slimy 
and of a greenish color, and is known to the butcher 
as "licked beef." On an average, the damage to the 
hides is placed at one-third their value and the loss 
of beef to each infested animal ranges from three 
to five dollars. 

The grub= may be pressed out through the opening 
at the top of the swelling . A sharp knife and a pair 
of tweezers will often facilitate the work of remov- 
ing the grubs. Care should be taken to crush all the 
grubs removed, to prevent their further development 
and transformation into flies. It is advisable to ex- 
amine the cattle for lumps or swellings over the 
back every two or three weeks during late winter 
and early spring to detect the pest. Various oils 
are often used. The lotion is either smeared over the 
infested region, or applied to the mouth of the breath- 
ing hole of the grub. One or two applications will 
usually be s-'ufficient. The objection to this method 
is that the wounds do not heal readily unless the 
grubs are removed. 

Some have claimed that the arsenical and coal tar 
dips can be used in the case of large herds which 
cannot readily be treated by direct removal of the 
grubs. It still remains to be determined, however, 
whether practical means of eradication can be made 
by the use of dips. Dips applied during spring and 
summer will no doubt kill many maggots, and eggs 
which are attached to hairs on the animals' bodies. 

The adult of the ox warble is a fly about half an 
inch long, very hairj', and resembling a small black 
honey bee. The females in depositing their eggs on 
cattle worry and torment the animals and frequently 
cause them to stampede for shelter or water. The fly 
does not sting or bite, but the animals seem to have 
an instinctive dread of its approach just as the horse 
has for the bot-fly. 

Fish oil, train oil, and other substances are often 
recommended as spray to keep off warble flies. To 
be effective, their use would have to be continued 
during spring and early summer, and such a practice 
would be difficult and expensive and impracticable 
except in the case of small herds of valuable cattle. 

The fllPs do not appear to attack cattle which stand 
in water or in dense shades. 

o 

H. G. Humphrey, a Nevada stockman, says the 
lamb crop of Nevada for 1916 added about three mil- 
lion dollars to the revenue of that State as 600,000 
lambs were sold at $5 each, the highest price ever 
known. 



EX-FIRE HORSE IS SAVING LIVES. 

He Supplies Tetanus Antitoxin Used in the War 
Hospitals. 



When the army surgeon at the field hospital on 
the French front stands over a soldier maimed and 
torn by shrapnel and lifts a shining needle-tipped 
instrument and fills its lube with tetanus antitoxin, 
he may pour it into a liquid that came from the 
veins of Dan, an old retired New York City fire 
horse, who lives on the Health Department sanita- 
rium farm at Otisville, N. Y. 

In the last five years, since he was discarded by 
the Fire Department, Dan has supplied diphtlieria 
antitoxin and tetanus serum which would have cost 
its users ?200,000 in the open market. At least 
100,000 European soldiers, it is estimated, have been 
treated with antitoxin taken from the veins of this 
old horse. He has been so inoculated with tetanus 
germs that he iiow produces the serum periodically 
and will so long as he lives. 

The rescue of the police mount Laughlin from the 
auctioneer's block recently because of resentment at 
the city's throwing to their fate the horses that have 
grown old in its service, makes of peculiar interest 
the role played by Dan after he outlived his active 
usefulness. 

Since th^- war started the New York City Health 
Department has been selling tetarus antitoxin to the 
fighting nations at the rate of $30,000 worth a year. 
In the first months of the war a shipment of the 
antitoxin was sent to Austria, but it is not known 
whether it ever reached its destination; the rest of 
the antitoxin .sold has gone to the allied nations. 
Dan and four other horses have produced this serum, 
from which was made antitoxin which has brought 
to the Health Department about $70,000. 

There are now on the Otisville farm about twenty 
horses, t'nder the New York City laws the Health 
Department produces the antitoxins for distribution 
in the city, free of charge to hospitals and those who 
cannot afford to pay for them. The law also provides 
that if the Health Department produces more anti- 
toxins than is needed in the city, it may sell the sur- 
plus, the revenue to be used for Health Department 
purposes. ITp to the beginning of the war, most of 
the serum produced at Otisville was for diphtheria 
antitoxin, there being ver>' little demand for tetanus 
antitoxin in New York. 

When the war started the department had a sur- 
plus of tetanus j'.ntitoxiin, which it sold in Europe 
and, inasmuch as the expense of producing more was 
not large, five horses instead of one were set to man- 
ufacturing the life-guarding fluid. The department 
has been supplying its European market and now 
has about 800 quarts in reserve. Dan, who used to 
make diphtheria antitoxin for use in the city, now 
makes tetanus serum. 

Dr. W. H. Parks, head of the Health Department 
laboratory, said last week that probably as many as 
400,000 v.ounded soldiers had been treated witli the 
tetanus antitoxin the department has sent abroad, 
with the result, he was sure, of the saving of many 
thousands of lives. Dr. Parks explained that the 
horses suffered almost nothing. He said the diph- 
theria inoculation made the animals a bit groggy, and 
perhaps might shorten their lives, but that the horses 
treated with the tetanus germs wore all in the best 
of health. Animals in very poor shape, when taken 
to the farm, have soon become sleek and handsome, 
despite the germs they carried around. The animals 
do no work and are fed on clover and all the other 
things that a horse likes to eat. 

When the horses are first received at the farm, 
they are gotten into good condition. Then it is de- 
cided which of the serums the horse is to be used 
to produce. Dr. Parks said that it was practicable 
to have a horse produce two serums at once, that 
there would be no quarrel among the germs. But he 
said that in practice, inasmuch as old horses were 
easy to get, only one serum was made by one horse. 

The animals are inoculated with the germs of 
either diphtheria or tetanus, and the dose is grad- 
ually increased, the animal's system all the time 
manufacturing antitoxin — a sort of super-vaccination. 
When a certain stage has been reached, the blood 
vessels in the animal's neck are tapped and an 
amount of blood taken from which the antitoxin is 
made in the Health Department laboratories. Diph- 
theria inoculation nmst be made more often than 
th.Tt for tetanus serum. 

It was after Dan had turned out many quarts of 
diphtheria serum that the war turned him into a 
lockjaw serum plant. He was "fed up" before the 
treatment was started. It took about three weeks of 
inoculation treatment before his blood was in the 
proper state to produce the best serum. The tetanus 
germs caused the making of antitoxin to counteract 
them, and gradually Dan's blood came to the point 
where he could make a ery large amount of anti- 
toxin need'^d to combat the germs shot into his veins. 
He is now regularly led up to the stables, and the 
blood taken from his neck. The doctors who do the 
work say that he suffers no pain except the slight 
prick of the needle, which doesn't cause him to move 
in his tracks. After the blood is taken, Dan goes on 
about his business of doing nothing in particular. 
Another horse that has pioduced perhaps almost as 
much antitoxin as Dan is Old Faithful, who was re- 
tired from the Street Cleaning Department several 
years ago. 

Dr. Parks said that all of the horses on the Otis- 
ville Sanitarium farm had been obtained from the 



Street Cleaning and Fire Departments after they had 
outlived their term of service. He said that while 
there was no use on the farm for all the horses the 
city retired, and while he said it was not his prov- 
ince to say what could be done with them, the exam- 
ple of the horses at Otisville was a consummate 
example of service which no human ever excelled. 

"These horses have saved many lives," he said. 
"Twenty-six thousand persons annually in New Y'ork 
City arc treated with the diphtheria antitoxin made 
at Otisville, and himdreds of thousands of soldiers 
who have received wounds on Europe's battlefields 
have been helped in their fight for life by the serum 
which flowed from the veins of Old Dan and his 
partners." 

Wormy Horses Do Not Thrive. 

Many horses lose condition, or fail to make gains 
during winter months, because they arc infected with 
worms. This is especially true of colts. Horses 
suffering from worms generally have a good appe- 
tite, hut apparently benefit little from the food eaten. 

There may be no symptoms which point conclu- 
sively to worms, but this trouble is so common that 
if the colts and horses are not doing as well as they 
should for the food given, a worm remedy may prove 
of decided value. In treating horses for worms. Dr. 
L. S. Backus ,of the University of Missouri College 
of Agriculture, suggests it is well to keep in mind 
that the drug is meant for the worm rather than the 
horse and should therefore be given in as concen- 
trated form as possible. To insure this, little or no 
bulky food should be fed during the course of treat- 
ment, and as the parasites are stupified by worm 
remedies rather than killed, the animal's bowels 
should be kept in an active condition so that the 
stupefied worms may be passed out before they re- 
gain their vitality. A well salted bran mash once 
a day will generally insure such an action. 

The following formula is a woim remedy which is 
also of value as a tonic: Powdered Nux Vomica 2 
ounces; Powdered Gentian Root 4 ounces; Powdered 
Areca Nut 6 ounces; Sodium Chloride 4 ounces; Ar- 
senious Acid 2 drams. Mix. 

Give one heaping teaspoouful to every 250 pounds 
weight, every morning and evening for about ten 
days. The medicine may be mixed with ground feed 
or sprinkled over oats or corn which has been damp- 
ened. 

Harness Prices Going Skyward. 

As one of the results of the great war in Europe 
there is a shortage of harness in the wholesale mar- 
kets of the United States, which threatens soon to 
be sharply felt by the consumer. Prices for all grades 
of harness leather have advanced again and again in 
the last few months, and now conies word from some 
of the largest producers that business is at a stand- 
still because the supply of hides has given out. 

Retail dealers in harness in New York say they 
have not yet put their prices up, but those who renew 
tlieii stock hereafter will have to do so, according 
to all experts in the manufacturing industry, some of 
whom predict an advance of 60 per cent before 
spring. 

There has been a noticeable increase lately in the 
demand for second hand harness, and though much 
of it has come into the market this winter the sellers 
are getting better returns than at any other time in 
years. 

.Some of the men in the harness trade predict an 
unprecedented shortage even after the war ends. 
One of them said the other day that soaring prices 
are going to teach American horse owners in the 
near future to take better care of their harness. This 
expert estimates that dirt and neglect now shorten 
the life of the average set at least fifty per cent. 

To keep harness in proper condition it should be 
taken to pieces every now and then, and washed 
with warm water and castile soap. Then it should 
be oiled before it is put together again, and when 
hung up for any length of time should be covered to 
keep the dust from settling on the leather. Harness 
that is hung up for the winter without washing and 
oiling will go to pieces twice as fast as if it were 
used daily, and the man who neglects it this winter 
will probably find next spring, when in need of a 
new one. that the set for which he has been paying 
$100 will cost him $200 or more. 



Mrs. Eliza Shepard, superintendent of the Jack 
London ranch at Glen Ellen, Sonoma county, reports 
the sale of twenty-five Duroc Jersey hogs to the 
Western Meat Company. The shipment, which aver- 
aged 205 pounds, killed out 81 per cent, and brought 
the fancy price of 10 cents per pound on foot. The 
London ranch culls out closely and keeps only the 
finest for breeding. A. E. Gaige, the Glen Ellen 
butcher, had a bet with Mrs. Shepard that 9hi cents 
would be the top price. The clever woman rancher 
wins and Mr. Gaige must buy the bonnet. Mrs. 
Shepard and Mrs. Jack London contemplate a trip 
to the East next month, to buy short homed heifers, 
which will be added to the prize stock at the ranch 
above Glen Ellen. 

<S> ❖ ♦ 

J. C. Bruss, of Tulare county, has received twelve 
head of Tam worth hogs from Bear Creek Farm, 
Palmer, Illinois, and plans to raise this breed of 
hogs on a ranch near Tulare. These hogs are from 
registered stock and premium winning sires. English 
bacon is made from this kind of hog. Mr. Bruss has 
raised Tamworth hogs in the past, and feels that 
the business can be profitably conducted in Tulare 
county. 



Saturday, January 6, 1917] 



THE BR EEDER AND SPORTSMAN 




a n 

I THE FARM ! 



DRAINING WET LANDS WITH 
DYNAMITE. 



The success of a crop depends large- 
ly upon being able to get it planted in 
time. Nature sometimes hinders us 
with too much rain, and many times, 
on days after heavy rains, we find the 
farmers waiting for the land to dry 
off sufficiently so they can do their 
plowing. 

This was the case with my land. 
Thinking that the condition could be 
remedied by doing the plowing in fall, 
I did most of it at that time. The 
next thing was to devise an econom- 
ical way to drain it. Not being blessed 
with an abundance of money, I re- 
sorted to blasting as the most immed- 
iately practical expedient. 

I decided to blast the subsoil to 
make top-soil porous. After the wheat 
had been cut a man was put to work 
making holes two inches in diameter 
and three feet deep, every 15 feet. The 
land was in good condition to blast, 
being perfectly dry. After the holes 
were made, with the assistance of the 
man I loaded each hole with half a 
stick of 20 per cent dynamite. These 
charges were lightly tamped with a 
wooden tamper. When a row of holes 
had been loaded they were discharged 
and in due time the entire field was 
gone over. The land was fall-plowed 
and left until spring. 

We were eager to see the results 
obtained, if any. In the spring, to our 
surprise, we were able to work the 
blasted field exactly nine days sooner 
than we could the adjoining piece that 
was not blasted. 

The blasted piece of land was ma- 
nured and worked and corn planted. 
The corn grew and grew and at last 
we obtained something like a crop for 
our trouble. The ne.xt fall the other 
portion of the land received a good 
shaking up with the same results. The 
breaking up of this tough subsoil 
caused the water, that usually lay in 
the top soil, to be filtered down into 



the subsoil. 

This blasting was done four years 
ago and ever since then we have been 
able to get on the land when we wen> 
ready. — F. A. Kuhn. 



Shortage of Wheat. — For the first 
time in fifty years our wheat crop is 
not big enougii for our own require- 
ments. The government's estimate on 
September 8. 1916, was 611,000,000 
bushels. The (Tnited States requires 
625,000,000 bushels for bread and for 
seed. 

Fortunately a surplus of 163,000,000 
bushels was carried over from last 
>ear, but this will not serve to keep 
prices down if the war continues. The 
price of Hour has been rising all fall, 
and bakers in the cities are cutting 
out the 5-cent loaf of bread and mak- 
ing the 10-cent loaf smaller. The crop 
was sliort all over the world. The for- 
eign buyers, of course, came after the 
Canada crop and actively bid for our 
own small surplus. 

Should the war end soon, and the 
three-year surplus of Russia's crops be 
moved to market, the situation would 
brighten for those who must buy flour 
or bread. As it is, all the joy gleams 
in the situation are for the farmers 
who have wheat to sell, and for the 
speculators. 

We can feel happy that a few farm- 
ers are making some money, but we 
are decidedly lacking in enthusiasm 
regarding the speculator's profits. We 
would like to see him accumulate a 
little more experience in the tedious 
details of raising wheat and much less 
in the pocketing of gains from crops 
that others toil to produce. 



TELEPHONE KENNELS 

530 FULTON ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Market 2074. 

Dogs and pups of all breeds for sale. 
Dogs boarded under sanitary condi- 
tions. Special care of bitches in whelp 
and puppies. Dogs clipped and baths 
carefully given. Positively no sick 
dogs accepted. 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

Proprietor. 



! 

Four 

Routes 

East! 

Sunset Route: 

Along the Mission Trail, 
and through the Dixieland 
of song and story. To New 
Orleans via Los Angeles, 
El Paso, Houston, and San 
Antonio. Southern Pacific 
Atlantic Steamship Line, 
sailings \\'ednesdays and 
Saturdays, New Orleans 
to New York. 

Ogden Route: 

Across the Sierras and 
over the Great Salt Lake 
Cut-off. To Chicago via 
Ogden and Omaha; also 
to St. Louis via Ogden, 
Denver and Kansas City. 

Sh&sta Route: 

Skirting majestic Mount 
Shasta and crossing tlie 
Siskiyous. To Portland, 
Tacoma and Seattle. 

£1 Paso Route : 

The "Golden State Route" 
through the Southwest. 
To Chicago and St. Louis 
via Los Angeles, Tucson, 
El Paso, and Kansas City. 

Oil Burning Locomotives 

No Cinders, No Smudge, No Annoying 
Smoke. 

Unexcelled Dining Car Service 

FOR FARES AND TRAIN SERVICE 
ASK ANY AGENT 

Southern Pacific 

Write for folder on the 
Apache Trail of Arizona 



..Modern Horse Management.. 

By 

CAPTAIN R. S. TIMMIS 

Nearly 500 photographs and drawings. 
144 Plates 11x8. Royal quarto, 316 
pages. Cassell & Co.: London, To- 
ronto, Melbourne, etc. Stokes & Co.: 
New York. $5 postpaid. 
"A mo.st valuable authority." — Sporting 

and Dramatic News, London. 
"Very sound and well thought out." — The 
Field. 

"A book that should be widely known." — 
Hor.se and Hound. 

"The frult.s of a tree whose roots are 
KTOiinded In practical experience." — 
Ulood.stock Breeders' Review. 

"Worthy to take Its place as a standard 
work." — Sporting Life. 

"A valuable addition to the horse library" 
—Irish Field. 

"Should be In the possession of every 
horse owner." — The Broad Arrow. 

".Should .strike a popular note." — New 
York Spur. 

"The fruit of practical experience." — Chi- 
cago Horse Review. 

"On a scale not heretofore attempted by 
a writer. — Horse World, Buffalo. 

"Deserves the widest possible apprecia- 
tion." — Farm Life, London. 

For sale by 

BREEDER A SPORTSMAN, 
P. O. Drawer 447, San Franclaca 



Wm .F. EGAN. V.M.R.C.S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 
1155 Golden Cat* Av«nu* 

Branch Hoapltal, corner Wabstcr and 

Chestnut Streets. 

S&n Francisco, California^ 




Will rediuc Inflamed, Strained, 
Swollen Tendons, Ligaments, 
or Muscles. Stops t lie lamcness.-uid 
pain from a Splint, Side Bone or 
Bone Spavin. No blister, no liair 
gone and horse can be used. $Z a 
bottle at druggists or delivered. De- 
scribe your rase for special instruc- 



tion* anj interesting horse Book 2 M Free. 
ABSQRBINE, JR., the antiseptic liniment for 
mankind, reduces Strained, Torn Liga- 
ments, Swollen Glands. Veins or Muscles; 
Heals Cuts, Sores, Ulcers. Allays pain. Ptic« 
SI.UO > bnltlr II H-ilrri or (tflurred. Book "Endrncc" fret. 

W. F. YOUNG, P.D.F., 54 Temple St., Springfield, Mass. 

Tot ulthj Luiglay « Mlchuli, 8u Frinclici., Calif.: 
Woodward, Clark A Co , Portland. Ore ; Cal. Diur A Cham. 
Co., Bruniwlg PrUff Co , Wcitorn Wholeial« Drag Co , Lo« 
Angtlaa, Calh Kirk, Claary <t Co.. Sacramento, Calif ; 
Paclac Drtig. Co., Seattle, Waah.; Spokane Drug Co., 8pc 
kane, Waah.; OofOn, Radlngton Co., San FrancUco, OaL ^ 



lassified Advertising 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION FOR SAL! 

Hrowii, si.\ years old. sired l)y Orsiiii. dam 
Leta Trl.\ by lirutus. sound, lircd by J. .1. 
Moore. Address J.\MKS L.VY.NE. 

211 S. Kiver .Street. .<an Jose. Cal. 



Black gelding:, .six years, 15.2 hands, 
1,0.50 Ib.s., perfect beauty and a show 
hor.se. Kind, gentle and fearle.s.s. Ab- 
.solutely .sound. Natural smooth pacer. 
Wear.s neither boot.s or .straps. Sired by 
Vas.ser 2:07. Fir.st dam Zenobie 2:19 by 
Zonibro. 2d dam by Truman 2:12, son of 
Electioneer. This lior.se paced a mile a.s a 
3-year-old at 2:14. If given a chance, he 
is rugged and strong, and with his racing 
Qualities I think he will make a 2:05 
pacer. For sale reasonable. 

H. OLSEN, 1450— 46th Ave., Oakland. 



FOR SALE— THE ICICLE by The Ice- 
man 2:10, dam California by a son of 
Sable Wilkes, next dam thoroughbred. 
Handsome ( dark bay horse with black 
mane and tail, star, and both hind pas- 
terns white. A remarkably showy horse, 
weighs 1000 pounds, stands 15% hands 
high and can show five gaits under sad- 
dle. Has trotted a mile in 2:16%, last 
quarter in 321/2 seconds; trotted a half in 
1:04'/^. Kind disposition and intelligent. 
One of the most desirable horses to ride, 
drive, or show, in California. Will be 
sold cheap. Address 

A. T. JACKSON, 

R. 4, Box 11, Stockton, Cal, 



I WANT TO BUY.— I have sold eleven 
horses in the last few months ranging 
from $2,000 to $200. If you have a horse 
for sale and will write me, I will tell you 
what my system is. It Is a winner. I find 
there is a buyer for every horse for sal* 
at the right price. It is just a question of 
getting the buyer and seller together. If 
you have one for sale let me hear from 
you. MAGNUS FLAWS, 

542 S. Dearborn St.. Chicago, III. 



Choice Land In Idaho 
FARMS FOR SALE 

Lewlston, Idaho, Is situated at the 
forks of Clearwater and Snake rivers and 
has transpjrtatlon to the coast. 

960 acres 1% miles from Lewlston, Ida- 
ho, 4V4 from Lapwal, Idaho, on main 
traveled road, all In cultivation except 
al.out 15 acres, all level land. Just a little 
rolling, 320 acres of fall wheat In. 225 
acres fall plowed for spring crop, about 
30 acres In alfalfa. All fenced and cross 
fenced. Two good springs with big cem- 
ent water troughs, well, windmill and 
cement reservoir, water piped to house. 
7 room house, hot and cold water and 
electric lights. Large horse barn with 
hay mow In the center, electric lights In 
barn; cow barn with two box stalls; hog 
pens, shade trees, chicken houses, black- 
smith shop, wagon shed, granary, outdoor 
cellar with bunk house overhead. $85 per 
acre; will take one-third down, time on 
balance to suit purchaser, at 7 per cent 
interest. One-third of crop goes with 
place if sold any time up clo.se to harvest. 
Mild climate, can raise all kinds of fruit, 
grain and vegetables. Wheat In thl» 
country goes from 35 to 65 busJiels per 
acre, barley 40 to 80 bushels per «cre. 

320 acres 4V4 miles south of Vollmer, 
Idaho. 275 acres In cultivation, balance In 
pasture and timber, farm land lays prac- 
tically level, one-third of crop goes with 
place If sold before harvest. Some fall 
wheat already sown. All fenced and cross 
fenced. Quarter section of It fenced hot 
tight; good four-room houso, wood shed, 
and out of door cellar, nice grove around 
house, well at house, fair stabling and 
out buildings, spring and spring creek 
"lose to barn, three springs on place. 
Price $70 per acre, one-third cash, bal- 
ance at 7 per cent. Time to suit pur- 
chaser. 

238 acres i% miles from Lewlston. Ida- 
ho, 175 acres in cultivation, 25 more can 
be cultivated, balance good bunch gins* 
pasture, fenced and cross- fenced, good 
spring creek runs across place, .iniall 
house, station on place for John.:on It. R., 
two ^aln warehouses at slntlon. Prlc« 
$70 per acre, one-third cash, balanre at 
7 per cent. Time to suit purchaser. 

F. W. KELr-BY, 
Drawer 447, San Francisco, Ca!, 



A"365" Day Liniment 



OU ARE SAYING TO YOURSELF— 
"If I only knew of something to stop 

that Backache — help my Rheumatism — cure my 
Neuralgia, I would send and get it at once." 
Gombault's Caustic Balsam will give you immediate 
A Marvelous Human Flesh Healer arid a never failing 
remedy for every known pain that can be relieved or cured by 
external applications. Thousands testify to the wonderful healing and 
curing powers of this great French Remedy. A Liniment that will 
soothe, heal and cure your every day pains, wounds and bruises. 




Gei It. 
Relief. 



Gombault's Caustic Balsam 

The Great French Remiedy 

Will Do It 



/* //e/pa Nature to Heal and Care. Penetrates, acts quickly, yet Is^^Jj 
perfectly harmless. Kills all Germs and prevents Blood Poison. Nothing 
so good known as an application for Sores, Wounds, Felons, Exterior 
Cancers, Burns, Carbuncles and Swellings. 

"I had a bad hand with four running sores on It. The more I doctored the 
worselterot. I used Caustic Balsam and never needed a doctor after that." 
—Ed. Rosenborg, St. Ansgat, la. 

Mrm. Jamet MeKenzie, EJina. Mo., lay: "Just ten applications of 
Caustic Balsam relieved me of goitre. My husband also cured eczema with It. 
and we use it for corns, bunions, colds, sore throat and pain in the cliest." 

A Safe. Reliable Remedy for Sore Throat. Chest Cold, Backache. 
Neuralgia, Sprains, Rheumatism and Stiff Joints. Whenever and 
wherever a Liniment is needed Caustic Balsam has no Equal. 

Dr. HIgley, Whitewater. Wi:. write*: "I have been using Caustic Balsam 
for ten years for different ailments. It has never failed me yet." 

A liniment that not only heals and cures Human Flesh, but for years 
the accepted Standard veterinary remedy of the world. 

Price, $1.50 per bottle at all Druggists or sent by us express prepaid. 
Write for Free Booklet and read what others say. 

THE LAWRENCE WILUAMS CO^ Oeveland. Ohio 



mi 




14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 6 ,1917 



/ 



BEAUTIFUL BELVEDERE 



mS FOR SALE 



/ 



CORINTHIAN ISLAND Subdivision to Belvedere is the 
most beautiful spot on the shores of San Francisco Bay 
for a suburban home. It commands an extensive view of 
the City of San Francisco, Alcatraz and Angel Islands, 
Raccoon Straits, San Francisco Bay, Richardson's Bay, 
the Berkeley shore, beautiful Belvedere and Mt. Tamal- 
pais. It is in Marin County, directly opposite San Fran- 
cisco, and forms the eastern shore of Belvedere cove. 
It has a naturally terraced, sunny, western slope that is 
well adapted for many choice residence sites, every one 
affording most picturesque views of the bay and moun- 
tain. It is protected from the prevailing western trade winds in 
summer by Belvedere Island, and from the southerly storms in 
winter by Angel Island. The soil is fertile and part of the island 
is well wooded. 

It is less subject to fog than any other place near San 
Francisco. The summer fog, as it rolls in from the ocean, splits 
on the western slope of Sausalito, part of it flowing in a line with 
Angel Island towards the Berkeley shore, and part of it along 
the southern slope of Mt. Tamalpais, leaving Belvedere, Corin- 
thian Island artd Raccoon Straits in the bright sunlight, while 
the fog banks can be seen as a white wall both to the north and 
the south. 

There is very little available land about the shores of San 
Francisco Bay that is desirable for homes, especially for those 
who love boating and kindred sports. The Alameda and Contra 
Costa shores of the bay are the lee shores and receive the full 
brunt of the boisterous trade winds which lash the shoal waters 
near the land into muddy waves, making boating both unpleas- 
ant and dangerous. To the north of the city and in Marin 
County the land from Sausalito to the entrance of the bay is a 
Government reservation and will never be placed on the market. 
The shores of Richardson's Bay are not at present convenient 
to boat service and, aside from Belvedere and Corinthian Island, 
there is little or no land near any ferry landing that possesses 
the natural advantages, improvements and possibilities that are 
offered on Corinthian Island. Concrete roads, pure water, tele- 
phone service and electric light wires are already installed. It is 
only ten minutes' walk from any point on the property to 
Tiburon boats, and but forty-three minutes' ride to the foot of 
Market Street. 

On the point of Corinthian Island the Corinthian Yacht 
Club has had its home for many years, and on any summer day 
the white sails of its numerous fleet add to the charming scene, 
as the trim yachts glide about the cove. Excellent fishing of all 
kinds for bay fish, including salmon, the gamey striped bass, 
rock fish and the toothsome silver smelt, is to be had in the cove. 
There is probably no spot so accessible and in such close prox- 
imity to any large city in the world that offers the attractions 
of climate, magnificent scenery, fishing and boating as wiH here 
be found. 




FOR MAPS, PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPt-V TO 



S. L. PLANT. 

PLANT RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO., 

32 BEALE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



6fl 



F. W. KELLEY. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN OFFICE, 

366 PACIFIC BUILDING 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday, January 6, 1917] 



THE BREEDER A 



ND SPORTSMAN 



15 



Buy A McNurray! 




The Real Lady (2) t. 2:04%, 
world's champion two-year-old, 
established two new world's rec- 
ords the first time hitched to the 
New McMurray Sulky. 

Every race record of two minutes 
or better in 1916 was made to 
the new McMurray Sulky. 

The Golden Anniversary Catalogue 
shows the complete line of Mc- 
Murray "E a s y Riding" Jog 
Carts In which horse action is 
absorbed Into the springs — The 
Model 80 "Flyer," the last word 
in a training cart — The New 
Model 44 "Featherweight" Racer 
for racing, training or Matinee 
driving, and is gladly mailed 
free. 

Remember, McMurrays build Sul- 
kies and Carts exclusively. Their 
mechanics are specially trained, 
and by devoting their entire time 
to one line, are better able to 
furnish a first quality article at 
lowest cost. 

Let McMurrays tell you what they 
can do for you. 

The McMurray Sulky Company 
288 N. Main St., Marion. Oliio 



GOOSE SHOOTING!! 



-ON- 



CHURCH-HANSON 

Famous Goose Preserve 

Near Rio Vista 



THE BEST GOOSE CALLERS IN THE 
STATE 
and a large number of 
LIVE GEESE DECOYS ALWAYS 
On Hand, Assure 
THE SPORTSMAN A GOOD SHOOT. 

FOR PARTICULARS and RESERVATION PHONE OR WRITE: 



W. Gordon Wagner 

PROPRIETOR 

HOTEL RIO VISTA 
Rio Vista — California 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to give the bo«t of pio- 
feaslonal services to all cases of veterlu- 
ary dentistry. Complicated cases treated 
successfully. Calls from out of town 
promptly responded to 

The Best Work at Reasonable Prices 
IRA BABKERDALZIEL, 

530 Fulton Street, 
San Francisco, Gal. 



FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 

— — — San Francisco =^ 

t AFFILIATED WITH THE FIRST N A T I O N A L BANK OF SAN FHANCISCO) 

You may start an account in the 

FIRST FEDERAL TRUST COMPANY 

with a small or large deposit 
which will draw interest compounded semi-annually. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG., 



POST AND MONTGOMERY STS.. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



s 



TALUON CARDS 



Send for Onr 
SAMPLES and 
CATALOG «f 
Horse Cuts 
Horse Books 
Impre|£nators, Supports, 
Serving Hobbles 
Remedies 

ETerything a Stallion 
Owner Needs 




Onr Stallion Folders. 
Posters, Sale and 
Farm Catalogs 
Compiled and Printied 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ cheaper than yon can get 

the printing alone. 

Send (or samples and prices. Our Stallion Service 
Books are the cheapest and best. 

We make ative-teoera- 
liOD pedigree (blood 
lines only) for $1. A 
four-iteDeralioa tabula, 
tion with ancestor's record progeny for $2; five-(enerations for 
$3 — all on a blank 14x17. A haadsome five.tfeneratioa labnla* 
tion, 16x20, printed in two-colors for framini, for $6, two copies 
for $6.50 or five for $7. Address 

Magnus Flaws & Co., 542 S. Dearborn SL, Chicago, DL 



Tabulated Pedigrees 



Pedigrees Tabulated 

Typewritten, Suitable For Framing = 

Stallion Service Books, $1.00 

Registration Standard-Bred Horses Attended to 

Stallion Folders 

with picture of the horae and terms on first page; complete tabulated pedigree 
on the tffo inside pages and description on back page 



-ADDRESS- 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 



366 PACIFIC BLDG. 
•AN FRANCISCO. 



To Be Sure You're Shooting a 

HIE 

vSMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDER 

DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
OR SCHULTZE 

Should Be on Case, Carton 
and the Top Shot Wad 

There is pr(>valent among shooters some con- 
fusion concerning Du Pont brands of smokeless 
shotgun powders; DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
and SCHULTZE are the Smokeless Shotgun 
Powders manufactured by the Du Pont Company 

Look at the Top Shot Wad 

—if it reads DUPONT, BALLISTPrE or SCHULTZE 
you have the Du Pont Company's powder in your 
shot shells. 

Ask for DUPONT, BALLISTPrE or SCHULTZE at 
your dealer's or club when buying loaded shells. 

For booklets giving loads for trap and game shooting, 
or any information about sporting powders, write to 

E. I. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 

WILMINGTON. DELAWARE 

BRANCHES: SAN FRANCISCO. SEATTLE and DENVER 



LIVESTOCK INSURANCE- 

Is just' as important as Fire Insurance, or automobile 
insurance or any other form of business protection. 
And, here is a company that provides that protection 
to stock owners with assurance of prompt payments 
when losses occur. 

Montana Livestock S Casualty Insurance Co. 

DOUGLAS KEITH, General Agent Northern Califor- 
nia, 701 Royal Insurance BIdg., San Francisco. 

W. H. MILLER, General Agent Southern California, 
505 Lankershim BIdg., Los Angeles. 



BLOODSTOCK 

STALLIONS. 

MARES. 

RACERS. 



MANY ANIMALS BEST STRAINS 
FOR DISPOSAL. 



Details Supplied on Application 
Stating Full Requirements 

IRISH BLOODSTOCK AGENCY 

COYLE & CO. (BROKERS), LTD., 

7 Anglesea St. 
DUBLIN, IRELAND 



IIANKKIW: 
BANK OF IRELAND 

Agents Required ThrouKlioiit tlie World. 



TKLKORAFIC A DDKK.S.S : 
"INSURANCE, DUBUN" 




Convenience- 
Train Schedule!; 
Fast Service | 
Clean comfortable ud'mg 
Observation car service 
Courteous employes 
Electrically heated cars 
Modern steel coaches. 

Between San Francisco 

AM) POINTS IN Tin: 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY 

On the "San Francisco-Sacramento Scenic Line" 
and Northern Electric Ry. 

Oaklatid, Antioch & Eastern Ry. 

SAN KKANCISCO DKTOT KKKRY IUJIL|)|N(i 
PHONK SUTTER 2339. 

HEALD'8 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

trains for business 
and places its graduates 
in position 

1215 VAN NESS AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



OCTOBER TRAP-SHOOTING TOURNAMENTS FURNISHED, AS USUAL, 



A BIG QUOTA OF 

VICTORIES WON WITH 



CULLISON, KANS., October 26. 

High Amateur Average, 142 ex 150, J. J. Randall. 
Second Amateur Average, 140 ex 150, Messrs. Toews, R. 
Foulke. 

Third Amateur Average, 139 ex 150, C. L. Howell. 

High General Average, 148 ex 150, D. D. Gross. 
WEBSTER LAKE, IND., October 23-25. 

High General Average, 288 ex 300, H. Kennlcott. 
LOGANSPORT, IND., October 17. 

High General Average, 148 ex 150, H. Kennlcott. 
HOBOKEN, N. J., October 13. 

High Amateur Average, 184 ex 200, H. Sindle. 
MT. PULASKI, ILL., October 11-12. 

High General Average, 286 ex 300, A. C. Connor. 

The (g) Brand Quality Is always "on the job." O 
wrcng if you buy shells or cartridges with the famili 

THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO.. 



S. Randall and 



SHELLS 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND., October 10-11. 

High Amateur Average (tie), 389 ex 400, Otis C. Funderburk. 
CINCINNATI, OHIO, October 5-6. 

High Amateur Average, 290 ex 300, W. R. Randall. 
TOLEDO, ILL., October 3. 

High Amateur Average, 147 ex 150, F. M. 
MEDFORD. OKLA., October 10. 

High Amateur Average, 141 ex 150. Wm. 
LINCOLNVILLE, KANS., October 6. 

High Amateur Average, 144 ex 150, P. J. 
OMAHA, NEB., October 16-17. 

High General Average, 229 ex 300, Phil R. Miller. 

(U. S. Professional Champion.) 
nly one standard is used in the Peters factory, and that is the very highest. You cannot go 
ar red on the labels. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Buckingham. 

Lambert. 
Cairns. 



^SAfT^S^^^^^: 585-587 Howard Street. 





The Subject of Friendly Comment 





"Vl i ^ \KJ HEREVER the "Sport Alluring" grips the minds of men and women who love the great out-of- 
^..*:'^ doors — and that means in nearly every city, village and hamlet in this wide country — you'll find 

Remington UMC shotguns and "Speed Shells ' holding their leading place in the confidence of 
sportsmen who KNOW. 

The Remington UMC pump gun and the autoloading shotgun are chosen by shooters whose judgment is 
authoritative because their shooting records prove their ability to select the guns they use. 



At the traps, in the duck blind, afield — wherever sportsmen gather to show their skill and swap their yarns — Reming- 
ton UMC, the Red Ball Brand, is the subject of friendly comment. 



The Remington Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Company, 



Woolworth Building 



New York City, N. Y. 





Championship of California!!! 

PACIFIC COAST HANDICAP 1915 

HIGHEST QENERAI. AVERAGE, VERNON GUN CLUB, 
Loa Ang«l«s, July 2, 3 and 4, 1116 

493 ex 500 TARGETS 

All of tlie above winnin-- were inaile by Mr. Henry Ifirrniann Jr., with his :'.4 inch 
double barrel 

PARKER GUN 

Hixlieat Official General AveruK'<- for 1!»14 and iDlo was made with the 

PARKER GUN 

If Intereated In amall bore guaa write for Inatructiya booklet which will be lent free 
ea requait. For further partlculara regardlnK auna from t to It aauae, addreu 
PARKkM BROt., Marlden, Conn. New York ••■•■room, U Warren ttr^^ti 

•r A. W. duBr^y, Raaldlng Ag^nt, tan Fran^l*««, P. O. ■•x 1M 



-EL DORADO- 



COCOANUT oil MEAL 

FOR HORSES, MItK COWS. CHICKENS, 
T0UN6 PIOS AND H06S 

If Your Dealer Doesn't ( arry It, Address 

EL DORADO OIL WORKS 

433 California Street, San Fraacisco 

BLAKE MOFFIT 6 TOWNE 

DEAL«S p/VPCR 

ar-lat St., San Franolaeo, C^l. 
Blak«, UcFall * Co., Portland. Or*. 
Ulaka. MoOlt and Town*. Lot Ammtlat 



ALL CUTS 
IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PHOTO -ENGRAVING CO. 

215 LEIDESDORFP ST., 
San Pranclaeo, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 1810 

CLINDAUER iiiioiso ciiri SI 
• tinWMUCH Sin FrincLco, Ctl. 

General Livery and Sale Business 

COUNTRY HORSES POR SALE 

WEIGHING 1200 Lbs. TO 1700 Lbs. 

Mulas in Carload Lota 

Horiii ind Rill ol All OHcrlplloni ttr HIti (t All TIau 



X3 




VOLUME LXX. No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 13, 1917. 



Subscription— $3.00 Per Year 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1917 



Pleasanton Driving Park 

=—= PLEAS ANTON. CALIFORNIA 

offers for service for the season of 1917 the following stallions: 

THE ANVIL 2.02 3-4 

Fastest trotting stallion ever offered for service in California 
and fifth fastest entire trotter in the world 

Son of Si. Valiant Vincent 2:ll?i (by St. Vinoont 2:13V2 out ot the triple 
producer Grace L.ee 2:29'4 by Rlectloneer 125); dam Amy Smith by Kmperor 
Wilkes 2:20?i. sire of Prinoes.s Kulalia (4) 2:09U, etc.; grandam by Hamble- 
lonian 539. 

The Anvil is regarded by Edward F. Geers as one of the very greatest trot- 
ters that he has ever raced. For five years the pair of Tennesseeans went to 
the races together and in that time were but twice unplaced, while winining a 
total of fifteen races, Includine: the historic M. and M. 

As an individual he is most pleasing, not too large or coarse in any way but 
smoothly and compactly made and "all horse" in ever^r line. He is a perfect 
headed, pure gaited trotter, with the very best of disposition, and is destined 
to become a very great sire of trotting speed. Hi.s opportunities in the stud 
have been very slight as he has been retired from racing only since the close 
of 1914. He was selected to head the stud at Pleasanton Driving Park not only 
on account of his great qualities as a race trotter, but because one of his first 
foals, Anvilite (2) 2:22Vi. with a trial of ten seconds or more faster, was In 
every way the greatest colt trotter ever handled by C. L. DeRyder. The services 
of The Anvil are recoinniended to vou without reserve. 

Fee for THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4, $50 with usual privilege 

Vernon McKinney 2:01 1-2 

Fastest member of the great family of McKinney 2:1114 
Sire of VERNA McKINNEY (2) 2:13 (his first foal raced), fastest two- 
year-old pacing filly of 1915, three-year-old record, 1916, 2:0914; 
VERNON DIABLO, mat, rec. half mile track 2:1414, a"d DR. DYER 
(3) trial 2:1214. 

Son of Guy McKinney :'7625 (by McKinney 2:lHi out of Flossie Drais by Guy 
Wilkes 2:loVi); dam Maud Vernon by Mount Vernon 2:15%. sire of the dams of 
Leata J. 2:03, etc.; grandam Mag by General McClellan, sire of the dams of 
Mack Mack 2:08. etc. 

Vernon McKinney's racing career was not an extensive one but will long be 
remembered for the excellence of his performances, as his winnings include a 
Chamber of Commerce stske in time very near the record for that event at the 
time, and he is the fastest of all the McKinneys. 

He is a horse of rare qualities in the way of individual excellence, almost 
ideal in behavior and temperament in harness or out. Since his retirement he 
has been a popular hor.se in the stud and our claim that lie would prove a very 
great sire of pacing speed has been fully substant-ated. his first foal to be raced 
being the soa.'ion champion for the age and gait in 1915. a most excellent testi- 
monial to his potency. He is a very sure breeder, his get are uniformly endowed 
with natural speed Mnd tiie physical and mental re(|Uirements of modern race 
hor.ves and find re.Tdy .^ale .it mi-st gratifying prices. 

Fee for VERNON McKINNEY 2:01 l ^. $50 with usual privilege. 

The bct^t of earj taken of 'nares in uny manner owners may desire, but no 
respon.-ihility assumed for accidents or escapes. Address for particulars 

GEORGE F. RYAN, Superintendent, PLEASANTON. CAL. 



Thoroughbred sire M ARSE ABE 

WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1917 AT 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK 

Service Fee $50 



U f Yankee., 
ea 

< I 

u 
w 

< , 

S i Halo. 



, „ ( Hindoo ) 

I Hanover J 'Florence 

( Bourbon Itelle.. * g?,""*? Scotland 
I * Ella D. 

I { Himyar Alarm 

(. Correction .' i Ilira 

(Mannie Oraj . J f-pwner 
( Lizzie (i. 
( Hermit ' Newmlnster 

St. lllaise J ) .Seclusion 



Ida K. 



Address all communications to: 



(Fusee ) Marsyas 

( Vesuvienne 

(Kliitt Alfonso... ^Pl'*?.*"" 
> I Capitola 

( Lerna | Asteroid 

I Laura 



GEO. F. RYAN, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 



DILLCARA 57462 



Son of Sidney Dillon 23157 (sire of 9 in 2:10 list) and Guycara by Guy Wilkes 
2867 (sire of 3 in 2:10 list), \vill make the season of 1917 at 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK, PLEASANTON, GAL. 

SERVICE FEE $50 TO INSURE 

Dillcara is a full brother to Harold Dillon 39610, the leading sire ot New Zealand. 
Last season the get of Harold Dillon won 41 races, totallins over $25,000. 
Address all communications to 

GEO. F. RYAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



MANHATTAN STOCK AND POULTRY 

FOOD AND REMEDIES 

Awarded Gold Medal 
at California State Fair 

ENDORSED BY THE LEADING HORSEMEN 
OF THE UNITED STATES 

Red Ball Stock Food Co., 

OAKLAND CAL. 




IF YOU HAVE A HORSE TO SELL THIS SPRING 

The 50th regular and annual 
early Spring Sale of the 

CHICAGO HORSE SALE CO. 

at the 

UNION STOCK 
CHICAGO, 



YARDS, 
ILL. 



MARCH 26, 27, 28 and 29, 1917 



offers the best and surest wa)^ to secure the 
highest price with the least trouble, risk and 
expense. 

Consignments already secured from Cali- 
fornia enable us to properly care for con- 
signors who have one or more horses to sell 
and wish to save the expense and time of 
making the trip in person. 

JjCt us hear from you with particulars 
at once and we will give you all details by 
return mail. 

Address : 

Chicago Horse Sale Co., 

UNION STOCK YARDS, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Better Be Safe Than Sorry! 

INSURE YOUR LIVE STOCK IN THE 

"TWO HARTFORDS" 

RESOURCES EXCEEDING $30,000,000 

SPECIAL SHIPPING POLICIES, FOALING AND CASTRATION POLICIES 

INSURE TODAY,— TOMORROW MAY BE TOO LATE 



Address all inquiries to 



ROLAND G. DRAKE, Asst. 6en. Apt, 

PACIFIC LIVESTOCK DEPARTMENT, HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

^35 CaUfornia Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Mention The Breeder end S|>ortenian 



s 



TAim CARDS 



Send for Our 
SAMPLES and 
CATALOG of 
Horse Cuts 
Horse Books 
Impre^nators, Supports, 
Serving Hobbles 
Remedies 

CTerythin£ a Stallion 
Owner Needs 




Oor Stallion Folders, 
Posters, Sale and 
Farm Catalogs 
Compiled and Printed 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m cheaper than yon can get 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ the printing alone. 
Send for samples and prices. Our Stallion Service 
Books are the cheapest and best. 

We nake afiTe-tenera- 

lion pedigree (blooJ 
lioes only) lor $1. A 
four-teoeratioB tabnta* 
tioQ with ancestor's record progeny for $2; Eive-lenerations for 
$3~all on a blank 14x17. A handsome five'teneration tabula* 
tton, 16x20, printed in two-colors for Eramioft, for $6, two copiea 
for $6.50 or live lor $7. Address 

Magnos Flaws & Co., 542 S. Dearborn St, Chicago, IlL 



Tabulated Pedigrees 



NKW EDITION OF JOHN SPLAN'S BOOK 

"LIFE WITH THE TROTTER" 

PRICE $3.00 POSTPAID 

"Ufa With the Trotter" give* ua a clear Inalcht Into the ways and meana to be 
adopted to increase pace, and preserve It when obtained. Thia work ts replete with 
Interest, and should be read by ail aectlona of soolatr, aa It Inculcatea the doetrtnea tt 
kindness to the horae from atart to flnlah." 

A MfM^ 8IUD1IDBB and BPORTBICAM, P. O. Dimwar 441, «M F i — il— OM. 



Saturday, January 13, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 East 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered aa Second Clasa Matter at San Franclaco P. O. 



Terms — One year. %3; six months, $1.75; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
BOc per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



A CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT will probably be organ- 
ized and dateR for the different members agreed upon 
at a meeting of county fair and track representa- 
tives to be held in the Pacific Building, S. F., on 
Tuesday afternoon next, Jan. 16th. This meeting has , 
been called by Secretary F. W. Kelley of the Pacific 
Coast Trot'.ing Horse Breeders' Association, who has 
aimed to get as many associations represented as 
possible by their secretaries or other persons who 
will be clothed with the authority to report that their 
associations will give harness races in 1917, and who 
also have the authority to name the dates on which 
those races will be given. If on Tuesday next this 
conference can agree on dates for enough meetings 
to form a circuit and will announce the same, the 
California harness racing season of 1917 will have 
made a start that will lead to a successful conclu- 
sion. Fair and other associations that make harness 
racing a part of their programs all desire large entry 
lists to assure good fields and successful racing, and 
if they will only realize that an early announcement 
of dates and racing programs is the very first step 
to take to insure such results, they will see that their 
organizations are represented at the meeting next 
Tuesday. It is certain that nine or ten fairs are to 
be given in California this year and it is probable 
that twice that number will be held . If these fairs 
will organize into a regular circuit, with dates ar- 
ranged so that exhibitors can ship from one to 
another by the shortest route and at the least ex- 
pense, and make an early announcement of the same, 
one-half of their battle will be won. The live stock 
men, the manufacturers, the fruit growers and the 
horsemen are only waiting for such an announce- 
ment to begin work preparing for these fairs. Horse 
owners especially must prepare their horses for the 
races and this takes time and costs money. A very 
large number of them will keep their horses running 
at pasture unless a good circuit is advertised early. 
Consequently the result of the conference which is 
to be held next Tuesday will be awaited with anxiety 
by every harness horse owner in California. We 
hope to be able to announce in the next issue of the 
Breeder and Sportsman that complete success has 
crowned the effort to organize a California circuit. 
o 

ANOTHER CHICAGO SALE is announced by the 
Chicago Horse Sales Company, whose December sale 
was such a success. Aliready there have been con- 
signments of California horses to the March sale and 
horse owners who desire to sell should read the pre- 
liminary advertisement in this week's Breeder and 
Sportsman and then write to the company for further 
particulars. 

o 

George Ryan, superintendent of the Pleasanton 
Stock Farm, has purchased from Lawrence & Com- 
stock, owners of the Oakwood Stock Farm, Lincoln, 
California, all the thoroughbreds remaining on that 
farm. There were 28 head in all, including twelve 
two-year-olds by Rey Hindoo, eleven two-year-olds 
by Salvation, five two-year-olds by Tim Payne and 
two three-year-olds, one by Salvation and the other 
by Tim Payne. A number of these are out of pro- 
ducing mares, among them being full sisters or 
brothers to Rhymer, Elizabeth McNauton, Premo 
Vera, So Eze, She Will, Little Ford, Rey Ennis and 
other two-year-old winners in 1916. Mr. Ryan is 
now having the two-year-olds broken, and they are 
about evenly divided as to sex, there being 13 colts 
among them. He expects to start several of them 
this year. 



Stake Races Would Build Up Harness Racing. 

John E. Madden, whose Kentucky t lioroughbred 
breeding stud is the most noted of its kind in the 
United States, made his start in the horse business 
with the trotters and he makes no secret of the fact 
that personally he likes the trotter much better than 
the thoroughbred and he owns and conducts a very 
select trotting stud, but on a much smaller scale 
than his thoroughbred stud. Mr. Madden declares 
that it is only the greater financial returns which 
thoroughbred breeding results in that keeps him in 
that branch of breeding; that if harness racing was 
marked by the same degree of slake racing that is 
in vogue on the running tracks his trotting stud 
would far overshadow his thoroughbred breeding 
operations. He declares that if the system of stake 
racing now in vogue on the running turf were to be 
dispensed with, the standard of racing would be so 
reduced and the earning capacity of the horses would 
be so impaired that the good performers would be 
buried and the breeding studs devoted to the produc- 
tion of race horses would go out of existence. With 
the stake system, Mr. Madden says, dozens of possi- 
ble winners of each big fixed event are picked 
months before the date of the race and every horse's 
chances are discussed for weeks before the event. 
Few persons go to the races nowadays, the Kentucky 
turfman asserts, simply to gamble, and to do away 
with these stake events would destroy public interest 
in racing to the extent that would mean the end of 
high-class racing. How much the stake system 
would do for harness racing is pointed out by Mr. 
Madden, in connection with the lessons taught by 
last month's big sale of trotters in New York. Two- 
year-olds, yearlings, and weanlings brought prices 
way up in the thousands when engaged in futurities, 
but those equally well bred and of equal promise 
were almost unsalable when not eligible to those 
events. There are indications that Mr. Madden's 
views are getting the indorsement of many of the 
prominent men in harness racing circles and it is 
within the range of probability that some concerted 
effort to make stake racing more of a factor on the 
harness racing tracks than it is now is, may be made. 
o 

Word comes from Ireland that H. R. A. West, who 
has just returned from the war, and who is a well- 
known trainer (Eastern Circuit) is leaving for Can- 
ada on the S. S. Pretorian, with a shipment of thor- 
oughbred horses . All these horses except the year- 
lings have shown good form in Ireland and they will 
be disposed of on arrival in Canada. Mr. West will 
act as the agent of the Irish Bloodstock Agency of 
Dublin, and will be located at Hamilton, Ont. This 
firm, whose advertisement will be found in the col- 
umns of the Breeder and Sportsman, has sent many 
good horses to this country, among them Fair Mac, 
property of Grant Hugh Browne. They are also 
sending to Canada Opera Glass, chestnut colt (3), by 
William Rufus — Spyglass, by Royal Hampton, win- 
ner of many races. The horses Mr. West is bringing 
over are as follows: 

Never Fear, b g, 9, by Clonmell — Lady Glenwood, 
by Hackler. 

Iron Cross, b c, 2, by Galloping Simon — Madame 
Gull, by The Gull. 

Annie Edgar, b f, 2, by Sir Edgar — Lady Castle, 
by Gallinule. 

Bachelor's Bliss, blk c, 2, by Tredennis — Lady 
Black, by Le Noir. 

Bachelor's Blend, ch f, 4, by Tredennis — Lady 
Dern, by Derncleugh. 

Kilcroney, br f, 1, by Tredennis — Inocency, by 
Derncleugh. 

Royal Spinner, br m, 6, by Royal Hackle — Queen's 
Weather, by Royal Hampton. 

Royal Spinner won three steeplechases running 
this year and Never Fear won many 'chases includ- 
ing the Galway Plate, which is probably the best 
steeple-chase in Ireland. 

o 

"The past season has demonstrated that the Amer- 
ican thoroughbred is the equal of any in the world 
at any distance," remarked John E. Madden the 
other day. "The Lexington blood in the horse Star 
Hawk, that came from England, and other winners 
in America, shows that American blood will assert 
itself," continued Mr. Madden. "While in England 
Richard Croker's stallion Orby, whose dam is by our 
Hanover, may be mentioned. Orby, you know, is 
sixth on the leading sires' list this year, among his 
winners being Diadem (two-year-old winner of 
$12,91.5, the largest two-year-old winner in England 
only having $16,87.5 to his credit), Eos (three-year- 
old winner of $10,345), etc. The marked improve- 
ment of the race horse of today, and the demand for 
the service of the thoroughbred sire by the farmers, 
show its increasing popularity. Another pleasing 
feature of the situation at present is the large in- 
crease of patrons from the leisure class, both as 
breeders and attendants at the race track. It is to 
be regretted tha< the western associations, Kentucky 
among the number, have abolished steeple-chasing, 
a sport admired by all and especially by the ladies. 
The war in Europe has awakened the authorities to 
the great necessity of having good thoroughbred 
stallions for our native mares, and those who for- 
merly abused the running horse now stand in the 
ranks of those who see much virtue in them." — 
LThoroughbred Record. 

<?>€>«> 

Sad Sam holds a record at the Juarez track. He 
won the second race December 28th and a $2 ticket 
on him paid $445.80. 



North Pacific Fair Association. 

Seattle, Wash., January 4, 1917. 
Breeder and Sportsman, San Francisco, Cal. — 

Gentlemen: At its recent annual meeting in Port- 
land the North Pacific Fair Association revised its 
By-Laws to lake in affiliated members, — those that 
cannot give the requisite number of purses. County 
fairs and exhibitions may be included and receive the 
benefits of protection in concessions, amusements, 
etc. 

In addition to others the following classes were 
agreed upon for the seven active members: 
Trotting— 2:15, 2:20, 2:25, F.F.A. 
Pacing— 2:15, 2:20, 2:25, F.F.A. 

All events will close August 1st, with 5 per cent 
entry fee. In all the classes except the Free-for-All, 
the every-heat-a-race plan will be followed. 

The effort to make racing more attractive culmin- 
ated in a resolution compelling members to enforce 
the rule regarding colors, caps, and jackets for driv- 
ers and riders, and coats for grooms appearing on 
the tracks during the racing period. 

The racing season will begin at Vancouver, B. C, 
on August 20th, including Southwest Washington 
Fair, Chehalis; Spokane Interstate Fair, Grays Har- 
bor County Fair, Washington State Fair, New West- 
minster, B. C, and ending with the Oregon State 
Fair, Salem, the first week in October. 

The Stake Book will be issued early in 1917 and is 
to be had for a postal card to Jno. W. Pace, Sec'y. 
Seattle, Wash., or to any of the individual secre- 
taries. 

Very truly yours, 

NORTH PACIFIC FAIR ASS'N, 

By JNO. W. PACE, Secretary. 

o 

Grand Circuit Stewards Will Meet January 22d. 

Homer J. Cline, secretary of the Grand Circuit 
stewards, who for years has been the originator of 
ards, who for many years has been the originator of 
novelties in connection with matters pertaining to 
the harness turf, is now the author of another, 
namely, an official itinerary of the stewards' annual 
meeting. In years past all interested horsemen could 
know of these important sessions was the dale and 
the place where they were to be held, without any 
further information as to where the track managers 
could be found, when and where they held their pre- 
liminary meetings or what time and when the execu- 
tive sessions were in progress. 

According to Mr. Kline's official notice, the Grand 
Circuit stewards will be at the Georgian Terrace 
Hotel, Atlanta, Ga., on Monday, January 22, and 
Tuesday, January 23. At 10:30 a. m. Monday, the 
schedule committee, Ed. A. Tipton chairman, E. W. 
Swisher and A. A. Shantz, will be in executive ses- 
sion at Parlor A, to go over the applications, arrange 
the date schedule after a careful consideration of 
all matters pertaining to that important feature of 
the annual meeting. 

At the same hour the committee on rules and reg- 
ulations, composed of Edward Schoeneck, president 
of the New York State Fair Commission and Stale 
Fairs' Racing Commissioner, H. N. Bain, secretary 
of Hudson River Park track, Poughkeepsie. and H. 
K. Devereux, president of the stewards, will meet 
at Parlor E, and receive all suggestions from mem- 
bers and outsiders, as to changes or additions to the 
already existing regulations in force on the Grand 
Circuit. 

In case applications for racing dates and sugges- 
tions for changes of rules and regulations now in 
force hiive not been previously filed with Secretary 
Kline, 1853 East Eighty-first street, Cleveland, Ohio, 
they can be addressed direct to the hotel in Atlanta 
for consideration by the proper committee. 

The sessions of both committees will reopen at 
2:30 the same day, after a luncheon for stewards, 
their secretaries and friends, the afternoon sessions 
being followed by a dinner at which the stewards, 
secretaries and friends will be present. 

At 11 a. m. Tue.sday there will be an open meet- 
ing of the stewards to which all interested in the 
breeding and racing of trotters and pacers are invited 
to attend and make any suggestions they may have, 
looking toward the improvement of both, either per- 
sonally or by letters. The luncheon, after this open 
session, will be a family affair, as only stewards and 
their secretaries will be present. The executive ses- 
sion in which reports from committees will be pre- 
sented and everything pertaining to the season's date 
schedule, rules and regulations arranged, will be held 
at 1:30, and the closing session will be celebrated by 
a banquet starling at 7:30. Mr. Kline will gladly 
furnish any further information wanted by stewards 
or horsemen who intend to be present at the meeting, 
o 

An interesting item of news from Holland is that 
the law which was passed five years ago forbidding 
bookmaking and the use of the totalizator on Dutch 
race courses is to be rescinded . The reason for the 
removal of the prohibition is that it caused great 
injury to horse breeding in Holland. That racing 
cannot flourish unless accompanied by some form of 
speculation every one possessing practical acquaint- 
ance with the subject is well aware. Similarly it has 
been made plain since the beginning of the war, how 
grievously the horse breeding industry has been 
affected by the closing of many of our race courses, 
and in the circumstances the lesson from Holland is 
one that should not lightly be passed by. — [London 
Sportsman. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1917 



Harness Horses and Horsemen 



SANTA MARIA, CAL., AND ITS HORSEMEN. 



Something About a Young Trainer Who Put His 
First Four Horses Raced in the 2:10 List. 



[By C. C. Crippen.] 
It was during the spring and early summer of 1914 
while at the half mile track at Santa Maria, that 1 
made the acquaintance of a young amateur horseman 
(and a lot of other good fellows, too) who impressed 
me with his natural horsemanship and ability to 
drive a horse well in a race, and in a letter I wrote 
in June of that year for the Breeder and Sportsman, 
1 said of him; 

"VVni. Finli-y owns Pope Hartford, a fonr-year-old son 
of Wild Nutliiis that is a inatineo winner and recently 
worked a mile in 2. '20. IJy the way, the young owner 
and trainer of I'ope Harllord is a natural born reinsnian, 
and, while he trains and races his colt for pleasure only, 
.should he choose to become a professional driver of 
harness race horses he would undoubtedly win success; 
he is rapidly learning the tricks of the trade. With 
other horses than his own he has been equally successful 
aiul he has won more matinee races than any other mem- 
ber of the club this season." 

And the boy has made good; fulfilled my predic- 
tion that he would make a winner if he ever took to 
professional racing, and as far as I know he is the 
only driver that in his first two seasons of profes- 
sional races has taken but four horses lo the 
races and each horse returned with a winning race 
record better than 2; 10, and it is probably true that 
in this respect "Billy" Finley of Santa Maria, Cal., 
holds a world's record, and I congratulate him. He 
is deserving of success as he is well bred, well raised 
and as gentlemanly a young native son of the Golden 
West as ever entered into the harness horse racing 
game. 

In 1915 young Finley set forth for the first time 
on the professional track and invaded Colorado, Wy- 
oming and New Me.xico, with a quartet of side- 
wheelers consisting of the three green ones, Ben 
Corbett Jr., Pope Hartford and Mono Ansel, and the 
record mare Pointer's Daughter 2:11%. He started 
Pope Hartford 12 times, winning three first, five sec- 
ond, three third and one fourth moneys. The horse 
took a mile track lecord of 2: 09*4 in a winning race 
at • Denver, Colo., and a half mile track record of 
2:llVi at Casper, W yoming, which is the record for 
that State. The free-for-all pacers, which included 
Leata J. 2:03 and Way net ta 2:04%, raced over the 
same track the following day, but did not equal the 
time made by the automobile horse. I will here men- 
tion that his young owner did not drive Pope Hart- 
ford in the Denver race, where he made a record 
of 2:09%. "Joe" McGuire was behind him that day. 
But Finley gave him his entire training, and his de- 
velopment is the result of his young owner's maiden 
efforts as a trainer of race horses. He paced the 
Denver track in 2:08 and the Pueblo half mile track 
in 2:10. In 1916 he was turned out and not raced, 
as he was eligible to the same class as Ben Corbett 
Jr. and Pointer's Daughter, but his owner hopes to 
race him in 1917 and will soon start getting him 
ready for the coming year. 

Ben Corbett Jr. started twelve times and eight 
times headed the summaries, was second once, third 
once, fourth once and once behind the money. He 
took a winning race mile track record of 2:09Vi and 
a half mile track record of 2: 14 14. 

Mono Ansel answered the call of the bell eight 
times, was first twice, third once, fourth twice and 
three times out of the money. He took a wiurace 
record of 2; 19^4 over a half mile track and was timed 
in 2:08 over the mile ring at Denver. 

Pointer's Daughter raced eleven times a.gainst 
fields composed of such fast ones as Leata J. 2:03, 
Red Rock 2:10, Waynetta 2:04%, College Gent 
2:06»4. and Hal Boy 2:01»^, and finished second to 
the last named horse at the Exposition meeting in 
San Francisco. She was first once, second four 
times, third five times and once behind the banner at 
the Exposition when, on a muddy track, she was sent 
away on the run. She finished ahead of Leata J. 
2:03 in two races and in two races beat Waynetta 
to the wire. She went several miles better than 2:10 
over half mile tracks that were far from being fast. 

Altogether, "Billy" Finley started in his first year 
of professional racing four horses 43 times, was 14 
times first, 10 times second, 10 times third, 4 times 
fourth and 5 times where they didn't pay off. This 
includes the one race that McGuire drove for him at 
Denver. Reader, can you call to mind any other 
young driver that in his first season of professional 
racing over made as good a showing as the young 
man from "Windy Maria"? I don't think you can. 

During the season just past Finley has raced suc- 
cessfully Ben Corbett Jr. 2:06%, Mono Ansel 2:09i^ 
and Pointer's Daughter 2:09%. Their performances 
are too fresh in the minds of the readers of this 
paper to call for any summarizing. I will only state 
that for the number of starts he made and number 
of horses in his stable he was more limes first and 
second than any other driver whose campaign was 
confined to California and Phoenix, Ariz., and will 
add that in his first two seasons of professional race- 



driving he has campaigned four horses and each of 
the four has acquired winning race records better 
than 2:10. Who can beat it? At Phoenix Ben Cor- 
bett Jr. won a third heat in 2:06% after being second 
twice in 2:07%, and Mono Ansel was timed a mile 
in a race in 2:06 and stepped a half in better than 
a minute. Both these horses are perfectly at home 
on half mile tracks and were consistent winners at 
Hanford, Bakersfield and Riverside. Pointer's Daugh- 
ter was expected to be able to bring home all the 
2:10 class money in California but went lame at 
Santa Rosa and was unsound all through the season. 
She won a good race at Fresno in straight heats, 
pacing the third in 2:09V^, but hopelessly broke down 
at Riverside. 

V'oung Finley has fortunately had for a partner 
and counsellor in the racing business a capable and 
experienced horseman in Garrett Blosser, and to him 
in no small degree is due the success of the stable 
during the two seasons they have raced. The firm 
will prepare their stable for another campaign in 
1917 and if all goes well will have some additional 
members. In Garrett B., by Wild Nutling, they have 
a promising trotter, and a fast green pacer in R. W., 
a half brother to Ben Corbett Jr. that has been a 
mile in 2:08, also a brother to R. W. that is a prom- 
ising young pacer. 

Santa Maria will send other horses to the races 
next year besides those of Blosser & Finley. C. W. 
Short, who raced the good little pacer Silver Tips 
2:12% (half mile track record), will be out again 
with the brother to Chorro Prince 2:08 and a green 
trotter that is thought very highly of in Santa Maria. 
He is called Trigione, by Skidoo Wilkes, and has 
been a mile in 2:16 over the half mile track there. 
Mr. Short also has some promising colts that are 
entered in the California futurities; also a good 
gaited and fast trotting mare by Morris A., owned 
by Mr. Spooner of San Luis Obispo, that may also 
be .good enough to try for the money. 

"Con" McCormack has the pacing stallion. Show 
Willy by Wild Nutling, owned by F. Buzzini, that 
with little work has been in 2:24, and several young- 
sters of his own by the same sire, one in particular, 
a filly that shows all the earmarks of a fast pacer. 

James Hall has a handsome and fast three-year-old 
filly by The Proof 2:09%, that can beat a 2:20 clip. 

I'rank Treanor has two fillies by the same sire and 
Harry Steinhart has a Proof colt. All are trotters 
of promise and only require a little more work to 
demonstrate that the colts by the good son of The 
Exponent have all got speed at the trot. 

J. E. Moshier is working a four-year-old trotter by 
Rapallo (trial 2:08), the half brother to San Fran- 
cisco 2:07% that bears a very strong resemblance 
to his famous "Uncle" and will make a fast trotter. 

Wm. Mead, the popular clothing merchant of Santa 
Maria, has a four-year-old filly by El Zombro out ot 
My Trueheart 2; 19 '4, dam of True Kinney 2:12, that 
is a beautifully gaited trotter and one that cannot 
possibly help going fast with development. She can 
brush close to a two-minute clip now. She was bred 
by Keefer & Spencer, from whom she was purchased 
in 1914 by her present owner. And that reminds me 
that probably one of the best prospects that will be 
in the stable of Blosser & Finley is a black pacer 
called Melvin K., that Garrett Blosser purchased 
from Mell Keefer as a two-year-old in 1914. He is 
a full brother to Adansel (3) 2:14V4 by Prince Ansel, 
dam Advosta by Advertiser 2: 15^4, next dam by Nut- 
wood 600. He is said to be a very oily going side- 
wheeler with a lot of buzz. 

A few good race horses have gone forth from Santa 
Maria and won money and helped to advertise their 
home town, and more will follow and continue the 
good work. Many people will come to know that 
there is such a place as Santa Maria, Cal., that might 
never hear of that prosperous little out-of-the-way 
city were is not for the horses that come from there. 
Santa Maria has a present population of 4.000 and 
is /'.rowing. It is centrally located in the rich and 
productive valley of the same name whose tillers of 
the soil are rich and getting richer. This was an 
unusually prosperous year for the farmers ot Santa 
Maria. They raised thousands of acres of barley and 
sold it for $1.50 per hundred. They raised thousands 
of acres of beans which they sold for $10 per sack. 
One farmer sold 100 sacks for $1100, another re- 
ceived a check for $90,000 for his entire crop. A big 
beet sugar factory at Betteravia, nine miles from 
Santa Maria, has used the products of 10,000 acres 
of beets this year, and the beet growers have had 
a rich harvest. The oil fields near Santa Maria are 
booming. One man has just bought a tract of land 
for which he paid $1,800,000, besides several smaller 
tracts. The Santa Maria Valley, in the northern part 
of Santa Barbara county, California, is about the 
most prosperous valley in this great state today. We 
are interested in all the products of the valley that 
bring prosperity to its population — barley, beets, 
beans and oil — but the horses are our hobby, and 
here's hoping they will bring home more bacon in 
1917 than ever before! 

o 

Andrew Albright, proprietor of Prospect Farm, 
Hilton, N. J., the home of Nathan Axworthy 2:09i/4. 
has rented the palatial Stony Ford Farm Stable locat- 
ed at the Historic Track, Goshen, N. Y. 

<S> ^ <S> 

The Chicago Horse Review has advanced its sub- 
scription price from .?2.50 to $4 per year and the 
American Horse Breeder has advanced its price 
from $2 to $3. 



PACIFIC BREEDERS' FUTURITY STAKE NO. 16. 



The following fifty-one payments were made on 
the first of January in Futurity Stake No. 16, for 
foals of 1916. now yearlings. This stake had but 71 
original nominations, and of these 62 were kept 
eligible on the second payment and now 51 have had 
third payments made on them. This is a large per- 
centage and presages as many colts to be trained 
and kept eligible to start as have been kept in stakes 
with a much larger original entry list: 

J. N. Anderson's b g Derby Dillon by McDillon, dam 

Delia Derby by Chas. Derby. 
1. L. Borden's f Cleo Barnato by Barney Barnato, 

dam Cleopatra by Zolock; br c Robert Barnato 

by Barney Barnato, dam Roberta by Robert I.; 

b f Miss Stone by Ed. McKinney, dam Miss Volo 

by Antevolo. 

J. L. Bulloch's ch c Lindon Hall by Black Hall, dam 
Gadsky by Athablo; br c Chester W. by Black 
Hall, dam Cora Wickersham by Junio. 

T. L. Carey's ch f Quinie Star by Hallie's Star, dam 
Quinic Direct by Quintell. 

J. M. Clark's b c by Jim I^ogan, dam Ruby C. by 
Palo King. 

I. J. Cornett's bl f by Vernon McKinney, dam Mal- 
vina by Oh So. 

Hazen Cowan's br c by Guy Dillon, dam Maud Wilkes 
by Lynwood W. 

S. H. Cowell's foal by Peter McKlyo, dam Dione II 
by Cupid; foal by Panama, dam Ilulda C. by 
Dexter Prince; foal by Peter McKlyo, dam El- 
eanor Sears by Searchlight. 
• Wm E. Detels' br e by Mahomet Watts, dam Daphne 
McKinney by McKinney. 

J. F. Dunne's bl f by Mahomet Watts, dam Letter 
B. Jr. by Benton Boy. 

W. G. Durfee's b c by Carlokin, dam My Irene S. 
by Petigru; b f by Carlokin, dam Alherine by 
Patron; b f by Carlokin, dam La Gitana by Del 
Coronado; b c by Carlokin, dam Ezelda by Del 
Coronado; ch f by Copa de Oro, dam Pavlowa B. 
by Petigru; ch c by Copa de Oro, dam Subito 
by Stein way; b f by ('opa de Oro, dam Leonor 
McKay by McKinney; foal by Copa de Oro, dam 
Rosebud by Direcho. 

Wm. M. Ferguson's rn f Miss Helmont by Alton, 
dam by Jay Bird. 

Sam Flynn's f Healani Maid by Healani. dam Dic- 
tatus Maid. 

L. I^. Gilpin's b c Freddie C. by Palo King, dam Beau- 
tiful Mom by Iran Alto. 

W. S. Harkey's b c by Robert Bingen, dam Doviletta 
by Diablo. 

H. H. Helman's b g Dick Dillon by Warren Dillon, 

dam ;\Iollie McNeita by McKinney. 
Hemet Stock Farm's b f Zeta Lucile by Wilbur Lou, 

dam Zeta \v'. by Nutwood Wilkes. 
H. A. Hershey's b t Mable Bell by Jim Logan, dam 

Palo Maid by Palo King. 
A. W. Longley's bl or br f by Bond Wilk, dam Sidbar 

by Sidney. 

R. J. MacKenzie's b f by Mahomet Watts, dam Mar- 
tha Spy by The Spy; bl f by Quintell, dam Bar- 
oness Psyche by Baron Review; b f by Mahomet 
Watts, dam Mildred Togo by Togo; b c by Ma- 
homet Watts, dam Zombro Belle by Zombro. 

Roy D. Mayes' br c Master Derby by Jim Logan, dam 
Ramona by Demouio; b f Miss Logan P. by Jim 
Logan, dam Bally Pointer by Star Pointer. 

J. E. Montgomery's b c by Jim Logan, dam Edna R. 
Diablo by Diablo. 

Theo. Mueller's b c Alto Thorn by Richard Alto, dam 
Madge by Mechanic. 

Geo. P. Ryan's b f by Vernon McKinney, dam Miss 
Harris by Sidney Dillon. 

W. L. Selman's ch c Bill by Otis Jr., dam Miss Delta 
by J. J. M. Jr. 

J. E. Short's b c Valador by Skidoo Wilkes, dam 
Honda Girl by Rubino; b f Lady Earl by R. W., 
dam Keno by Prisiuo. 

Chas. F. Silva's b f by Teddy Bear, dam Normono 
by Demon !0. 

Jas. H. Spaftord's b c Stockton Lad by Royal McKin- 
ney, dam Libby H. by Bronzo McKinney. 

A. B. Spooner's b c Pecho Morris by Morris A., dam 
San Luis Belie by McGinnis. 

L. H .Todhunter's bl f Jean McKlyo by Peter Mc- 
Klyo, dam Leavinettie by Zombro. 

D. W. Wallis' b c Easter Angelus by Bondholder, dam 
Mary W. by Dictatus. 

M. L. Woy's br f McKinney B. by Stanford McKin- 
ney, dam Loma B. by Stam B.; b c Woy's Express 
by Expressive Mac, dam Florence B. by Bon Voy- 
age; br f Alice W. by Expressive Mac, dam 
Strathaiie by Strathway. 



Several eastern papers gave out that Havis James 
made the trip to California with Dick McMahon. All 
the California horsemen would have been glad to 
greet Mr. Jame«, who formerly resided at Pleasanton 
and managed the Pleasanton Stock Farm as well as 
trained the string of Mr. R. J. MacKenzle, but Mr. 
James did not make the trip. 

❖ ♦ ♦ 

The dead sire Zombro 2:11 now leads his sire, 
McKinney 2: 11 '4, as a sire of 2:10 trotters. He has 
18 to his credit and McKinney 17. Peter the Great 
2:0714 is the only stallion that has sired more and 
he has 39 trotters in the 2:10 list, four more than 
McKinney and Zombro combined. 



Saturday, January 13, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



I SADDLE and SHOW HORSES I 

li i 

i_ _ H 

(g,|ggs;®:KgMi!M'a'«gLK K'k il.!! K K « !! !: !: X K agJj'SX H 

Horseback riding has been at such a comparatively 
low ebb for the last few years that more than pass- 
ins; interest is bcius: taken by San Franciscans, in 
the number of prominent citiztMis who have swarmed 
in a general '"back to the horse" movement. At the 
San Francisco Riding Academy on Seventh avenue 
there are more than 100 line saddle horses quartered. 
Of this num.ber fifty are the property of the academy 
and the remainder are owned by San Francisco's 
horse lovers. 

While the majority of the horses being used are 
of the average Riding Academy class, there are an 
exceptionally large number of splendid horses. Many 
of them are noted for tlieir achievements in the 
show rings, and for their blood lines. Probably of 
these the mare. Mavis, which was the sensational 
debutant of Kentucky two years ago, is the best 
known and most important. Mavis, it will be remem- 
bered by horsemen, was brought out by Kentucky's 
premier exhibitor, "Exquisite" Billy Shropshire, who 
also brought out Hazel Dawn, Hazel Dazzle, Jack 
Barrymore and Blanche Ring. She was sold by Mr. 
Shiopshire to Henry Ahlers, of San Francisco, who 
is her present owner. She shows that she has had 
good treatment since coming west and with a little 
preparation could go to the select show rings and 
win. 

E. Courtney Ford is another local sportsman who 
has one of the attractive saddle horses in the Acad- 
emy, his good gelding Golden being one of the most 
admired horses on the eciuitation paths. This gelding 
is a big fellow, built for endurance and speed as well 
as attractiveness and represents one of the rarely 
successful crosses between the Thoroughbred and 
Hackney; he being sired by the imported stallion 
Manchester and having the much talked-of Avail for 
his dam . Mr. Ford is one of the most enthusiastic 
horse lovers in the city and few professionals can 
ride a horse to better advantage and at the same 
time look so well themselves while riding. 

Sanford L. Goldstein, treasurer of the California 
Fruit Packers Association and one of the leading 
sportsmen of the Pacific Coast, has three good saddle 
horses in the academy. Mr. Goldstein and his tal- 
ented daughter. Miss Edyth, are among the most 
regular patrons and the best part of their riding is 
their evident knowledge of what they are about, 
which is a rare thing at riding academies. Mr. Gold- 
stein has three horses in the academy — the bay geld- 
ing Mexico, which he uses personally; Melba, an at- 
tractive pony used by his daughter, and the splendid 
young stallion Chief Eagle 6073, which is in training. 
This is one of the best bred horses in the records, 
despite the fact that he was foaled in Oklahoma. He 
is sired by Regal Rex 5010, by Rex McDonald Jr. 
1418, by King Eagle 750. He was brought to Cali- 
fornia by J. M. Townsend of Yosemite, who later 
sold him to D. J. Desmond of San Francisco. Mr. 
Desmond sold him to Samuel Kramer, manager of 
the academy, who sold him to Mr. Goldstein. 

However encouraging it may be, by the number of 
sportsmen who are taking an interest in saddle 
horses in San Francisco, the steadily increasing 
number of children who are taking lessons at the 
academy means more to the game in California than 
any other thing. There are from 40 to 50 children 
in many classes ,and the way they are riding "rings" 
around some of the older devotees is not only amaz- 
ing, but amusing. 

It brings to mind the assertion of the late J. A. 
Potts, who was the father of the saddle horse indus- 
try in Missouri, when watching a crowd of kids (both 
white and black, riding some colts, and of which the 
writer was a member), that a person was not and 
could not be a real horseman unless brought up in 
the saddle. 

On December 29 Mr. Kramer conducted the first 
annual Children's Horse Show, and the nine classes 
had an average of eight entries. The pavilion was 
filled and as it was confined exclusively to children's 
events, ft has created a desire among them to know 
how to handle their mounts as well as to own the 
best horse. The judges in this event were Mrs. Phil 
Wand, Mis? Jean Wheeler and Miss Ysobel Chase. 
o 

The next important event on the horse show calen- 
dar will be the Dcmver show, which is conducted in 
connection with the National VV'estern Stock Show. 
In addition to the attractive heavy leather and light 
harness horse classes, a stake of $1,000 for five-gaitcd 
saddle horses and a $500 junior saddle stake will be 
given. The best horses in the East will come to- 
gether for the opening show of 1917. The show will 
be conducted under the same liberal lines as in 1916, 
which was supposed to be the best horse show ever 
conducted west of the Mississippi. Fred P. Johnson, 
the secretary, is one of the best known officials in 
the country and offers exhibitors every possible op- 
portunity for a profitable week. Denver is one of 
the best horse show towns in the West, and the show 
always attracts good crowds. The feature of the 
show, however, is in the number of sales made dur- 
ing the week. The show will be held from Jan. 22d 
to 27th. 



An Inquiry From Portland, Maine. 

In a letter to "Jump" Cauthorn, of the Breeder and 
Sportsman, Fred A. Thomas, of Portland. Maine, who 
is an old and valued subscriber of the Missouri 
Stockman, seeks information in regard to saddle 
horses and mules. His letter follows: 

"The gaited horse is a rare thing in this vicinity. 
There are no mules at all. Being an old subscriber 
of your paper I have naturally become interested in 
the)n. At the present time I have 18 saddle horses, 
that is, horses used for saddle purposes . What kind 
of horses should I buy? There are a lot of people 
here who would ride regularly if they could have an 
easy-going horse . If they try to ride a horse that 
trots it is hard for them and they soon become dis- 
couraged and give up. If they had a horse with a 
good easy gait they would ride regularly and many 
would buy horses. \\'hat kind should I buy, — a good 
nodding walker or one that is educated for the five 
gaits? Are such horses used in harness? 

"I use a number of work horses weighing from 
1.200 to 1.500 pounds and would like to know how 
mules compare with them. Are they lazier than 
liorses?" 

ANSWER. 

Saddle horses are used at the present time more 
for exercise than anything else. The majority of 
buyers want a walk, trot and canter horse. Just the 
kind Mr. Thomas wants to avoid. In his case, I 
should say a well educated, flve-gaited horse, would 
come nearer filling the bill. A real nodding walker 
usually referred to as a plantation horse is seldom 
a good driving horse, while the properly schooled 
five-gaited horse is an ideal harness horse. The 
best explanation is that a nodding walker is a natural 
gaited horse and a five-gaited horse is trained. If 
he is a real five-gaited horse, he will have an excel- 
lent trot, permitting of his use in harness to good 
advantage. However, for the ease and comfort in 
the saddle, 'Uiggested by Mr. Thomas, more attention 
shotild be paid to the slow gait, and if it is the right 
kind the horse will give an easier ride than the nod- 
ding walker. 

It is conceded that a 1400 pound mule will do the 
work of a 1600 pound horse. They are not lazy and 
working by the side of a good horse the mule will 
always hold his own. However, he is noted for taking 
'care of himself. No one ever heard of a mule being 
over driven. As drivers, they do not compare with 
good road horses, but are far better on the road than 
the average farm horse. They are easy keepers, can 
stand work, hardships and abuse, but appreciate good 
treatment as much as a horse. 

Dr. Gadsby Buys Two Kentucky Stars. 

Dr. W. C. Gadsby, of Kirkwood, Mo., invaded Ken- 
tucky during the holidays and purchased two of the 
most noted show horses in the Blue Grass, getting 
the stallion. Crimson Chief and the mare, Blanche 
Ring (Regina Loyd). The stallion was bought from 
Mode Nichol of Lexington and the mare from "Bil- 
lie" Shropshire, of Winchester. There has been 
some speculation in regard for whom Dr. Gadsby 
was acting. It has been reported that he bought 
them for Adolphus Busch III, of St. Louis, who has 
been keen to get in the saddle horse game for some 
time, while other rumors suggest they were pur- 
chased for G. S. Parsons, a St. Louis sportsman, who 
recently established a country place at Benson, Vt. 
More familiar friends of Dr. Gadsby, however, be- 
lieve he bought, them on his own account. The price 
paid for the two was $7,000. Out.side of the consign- 
ment Dr. Gadsby bought in Kentucky last February, 
this is one of the best sales made in that state this 
year. 

■ Crimson Chief is by Red McDonald and out of a 
daughter of Bourbon Chief. Blanche Ring is by the 
noted sire. Rex Peavine, and has for a dam that most 
noted of Kentucky matrons, Mary Dick, by Chester 
Dare 10. She was brought out by Brock Bros., of 
Georgetown, who sold her to Shropshire last spring. 
Well informed horsemen who have seen these young 
stars perform declare they are the most brilliant 
horses sold in Kentucky this year. 

Champion Hackney Pony. 

Tissington Amity, an English hackney harness 
pony, owned by Charles E. Coxe, of Philadelphia, 
was the busiest and most successful show horse of 
1916. Competing in forty-five classes she won forty- 
three first prizes, ten of which were championships. 
At the National Horse Show in N(>w York, s\w won 
first in every class in which she was sliown, winning 
the open class for harness ponies, the American 
Hackney Horse Society's special and the champion- 
ship of the show, to wind up her remarkable cam- 
paign. Her earnings for the year were $1,795 in 
money and $300 in plate. Tissington Amity is a bay 
mare, 13.3 hands high. She was bred by Sir Gilbert 
Greenall, of Warrington, England, and imported by 
Mr. Coxe in 1914. Her sire, Sir Horaci;, was one of 
the greatest hackney pony sires of his day. Her dam, 
Ailsa, was by Goldfinder VI, another noted bantam 
hackney sire in England ,and through sire and dam 
she is closely inbred to both Denmark and Lord 
Derby II. Frank E. Palmer has trained her and 
driven her in all her winning performances. 
o 

We are in receipt of our annual New Year remem- 
brance from our good friend, Jack O'Brien, the popu- 
lar Chicago horseman, which, as in fomier years, is 
a splendid lithograph calendar. 



NOTES. 



The horse show to be held in connection witli the 
National Western Stock Show, at Denver, January 
22-27, gives every indication of eclipsing the success- 
ful shows held under the same management in previ- 
ous years . Advices from Chicago are to the effect 
that Mr. Frank Peabody will show his stable of 
hunters, as well as the favorite heavy harness mare. 
Lady Tuck, and a pair of walk trot saddle horses. 
Mr. and Mrs. Peabody will leave Chicago in their 
private car, stopping at the Denver Show en route 
to the Pacific Coast. Mrs. Peabody is a channing 
young Chicago matron, a favorite in society circles, 
and the presence of herself and Mr. Peabody will 
lend prestige to the social functions already being 
arranged for by the Denver folk. In addition to the 
Peabody stable, the Denver entry list will include 
the stables of J R. Thompson, Chicago; Miss Long, 
Kansas City; J. R Peak. Winchester, III.; O. J. 
Mooers, Columbia, Mo.; Tom Bass, of Mexico, Mo.; 
Blades & Holeman, Holliday, Mo.; Joe T. Harris, 
Columbia, Mo., and other exhibitors of note. 

❖ ❖ 

D. Schilling, chairman of the Hor.se Show com- 
mittee, has announced that the classes will be passed 
upon by Judges Walter Palmer, of Ottawa, III.; Billy 
Roberts, Lexington, Ky. ; and James Lockridge, of 
Fayette, Mo. 

<$> ❖ ❖ 

One of the most important sales of saddle horses 
in Missouri since the new year, has been the sale of 
the handsome young stallion. Jack Kerrigan, by 
Judge J W. Dempsey of Shelbina, Mo., and J. J. 
O'Brien, of Chicago, who owned him jointly, to A. R. 
Lewis, a prominent banker of Marsailles, III., for 
$900. Jack Kerrigan was one of the good junior 
horses in Missouri in 1916. Exhibited by John Wood, 
he was in the money at the St. Louis fair and at 
The International. The sale was made by Mr. 
O'Brien, who is one of the leading dealers of high 
class horses in Chicago. 

^ <$> ^ 

D. Schilling, proprietor of the J.O.D. Ranch, Aroya, 
Colo., has recently purchased the black saddle stal- 
lion, Grassland King 3530 by Forest King 1462; dam 
Rozella 2877 by Rex McDonald 833; 2nd dam, Ro- 
mola C 2437 by Harry Montrose 3rd by Black Squir- 
rel 58. With Mr. Schilling's other recent purchase, 
the stallion, Noble Rex, by Rex Hardwick, Grassland 
King will be shown at the Denver Show. 

^ «> «> 

At the Chester ALterbury sale, near Madison, last 
week, a good Rex McDonald mare sold for the very 
low price of $75, while her colt by Rex Cloud Chief 
only brought $33. Their purchasers got two excep- 
tionally low bargains. 



THOROUGHBRED NOTES 



To bring about larger fields, handicapper W. S. 
Vosburgh suggests divided handicaps. "What I call 
a divided handicap," says the New Yorker, "is one 
for whicli all the horses nominated are weighted the 
same as in any handicap; then divided into two 
classes — those handicapped above — say 105 pounds 
or 100 pounds to form Race No. 1; those weighted 
below that figure, to form Race No. 2; only that 
the weights in Race No. 2 are raised 10 pounds or 15 
pounds. By these means we are enabled to have a 
race between horses of the first class without their 
being compelled to concede undue weight to inferior 
horses — something approaching a weight-for-age race 
with cliissiflcation. In Race No. 2, raising the weiglits 
renders the liorses probable starters, as it enabl(>s 
them to be ridden by competent jockeys — sometliing 
which under their original allotment is rarely po.s- 
sihle. In addition, it enables horses to win a handi- 
cap whicli they could not othei-wise, being outclassed. 
Such horses at present belong in the selling race 
class, yet their owners rarely care to sell them. To 
this class the divided handicap would open a new 
field of usefulness and thus help simplify the selling 
race que stion which has, is, and threatens always to 
be a vexatious one. 

<S> <$> <«> 

Campfire was far and away the largest money win- 
ning two-year-old in the United States in 1916. He 
won $48,965, and next to him were Hourless $16450, 
Harry Kelly $13,544. Ilwfa $7,350, Manokin $6,885, 
Bondage $6,685, America $6,495, Crank $6,290, Deer 
Trap $6,250, Koh-i-Noor $5,970, Ticket $5,825, Yankee 
Witfh $5,460, Fan G. $5,250, Tom McTaggart $5,200. 
No other two-year-old won as much as $5,000. 
<S> <S> <«> 

The New Orleans meeting opened January 1st. 
The big feature of the afternoon was the New Year's 
Handicap, and while Jefferson Livingston's Syrian 
was an easy winner o\ov Typhoon and Hanberk it 
was a thoroughly good contest and the track condi- 
tion undoubtedly had v(M-y much to do with the ease 
wi'h vvliicli the son of Electioneer scored. Nine 
horses contested for the stake, which was worth 
$1,380 to the winner. 

❖ ❖ ♦ 

The Jockey Club has changed the definition of a 
maiden and now any winner of a race on the flat is 
no longer a maiden. I'nder the old rule no penalty 
was provided for the winner of a sweepstakes or 
match race and a horse that had won a five or ten 
thousand dollar swcepst.-ikes could start in a regular 
stake race later on with a maiden allowance. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1917 



Sixty-Eight Nominations in State Fair Futurity No. 9. 



A slight increase in the number of nominations made in State Fair Futurity 
No. 9, over those made in Stake No. 8, is gratifying. While the increase is not 
large, five more mares have been named over last year's list, which shows that 
the interest in breeding and racing of trotting and pacing colts has not declined. 
Among the stallions to which these 68 mares were bred last year and whose 
prospective sons and daughters will compete for the divisions of the stake as 
three-year-olds, the trotter Peter McKlyo 2:06, owned by L. H. Todhunter of 
Sacramento, and the pacer Jim Logan 2:01%, owned by J. Elmo Montgomery 
of Davi.s, are tied for first place with eight of the mares bred to them in 1916 
nominated in the stake. Wilbur Lou (3) 2:10>4, owned by Hemet Stock Farm, 
is second with seven mares nominated, while Vernon McKinney 2:01i^ is third 
with six. Thirty-five breeders have made the 68 nominations in the stake, 
Hemet Slock Farm leading with six, J. Elmo Montgomery and R. J. MacKenzie 
making five each. R. D. Mayes and W. G. Durfee four each, and I. L. Borden, 
L. H. Todhunter and M. L. Woy naming three each. But one mare that was 
mated to a stallion outside of California has been nominated in the stake and 
that is the mare Helen Stiles 2:06iA that was bred to the great Kentucky sire 
Manrico 2:07'/4 last year and is nominated by W. G. Durfee of Los Angeles. 
The list of uominations in the stake follows: 



Owner. 



Mare Nominated. 



Stallion Bred To. 



F. R. Bain Vauria. cii m by Ceo. VV. McKinney. ... Wilbur Lou 

I. L. Borden Gold L.illy. b ni by Copa de Oro Guy Dillon 

I. L. Borden Cleopatra, ch m by Zolock Guy Dillon 

I. L. Borden Cherry B., b m by Barney Barnato Major's By Guy 

J. L.. Bullock Cora V.'ickersham, b m by Junio Black Hall 

John Clark Little Lucille, by Palo King Jim Logan 

John Clark Ruby C. b m by Palo King Jim Logan 

John N. Colomb Yolanda. b m by McKinney Onward McGregor 

S. H. Cowell Dione II, b m by Cupid Peter McKlyo 

S. H. Cowell Hulda C, ch m by Dexter Prince Panama 

W. E. Detels Daphne McKinney, b m by McKinney. .. George Hammet 

J. F. Dunne Letter B. Jr.. br m by Benton Boy El Voiante S. 

W. Ferguson Leta K., b m by Palite Alton 

L. L. Gilpin Beautiful Morn, b m by Iran Alto Expressive Mac 

Alex. Grant Sona. br m by McKinney Alhambra Prince 

Alex. Grant Coma, b m by Limonero Alhambra Prince 

Hemet Stock Farm. ..Liady Zombro. by Zombro Wilbur Lou 

Hemet Stock Farm.. .Hemet Girl, by Geo. W. McKinney Wilbur Lou 

Hemet Stock Farm. ..Eradiate, by Geo. W. McKinney Wilbur Lou 

Hemet Stock Farm. ..Zeta W.. by Nutwood Wilkes Wilbur Lou 



Hemet Stock Farm.. .Mamie Redmond, by Nutwood Wilkes Wilbur Lou 

Hemet Stock Farm. ..Louise Carter, by Chestnut Tom Kinney de Lopez 

H. A. Hershey Palo Maid, b ni by Palo King Jim Logan 

M. C. Keefer Nada, bl m by Nushagak The Proof 

J. E. Montgomery. .. .Beautiful Bird, b m by N\itwood Wilkes. . Jim Logan 

J E. Montgomery. .. .Maggie Hall, br m by Moko Jim Logan 

J. E. Montgomery. .. .Winnie Bond, h m by The Bondsman Jim Logan 

J. E. Montgomery Margaret M., ch m by Chestnut Tom... Jim Logan 

J. E. Montgomery Trilby Maid, ch m by Black Ralph Jr. . .Dan Logan 

Mrs. Mabel Lipson. . .Policia, s m by Best Policy Wick Hall 

Mrs. Mabel Lip.son. . . Jane C, br m by Zolock Wick Hall 

A. W. Longley Lady Gray, br m by Ben Benton Pedlar Direct 

A. W. Longley Sidbar, bl m by Sidney Pedlar Direct 

Geo. W. Lowery Copper the Ore, bl m by Direct Heir El Voiante S. 

Roy D. Maye.s Leota. b m by Diablo Jim Logan 

Roy D. Mayes Madeline Mar.'ihall, ch m by Demonic. .. Peter McKlyo 

Roy D. Mayes Bally Pointer, b m by Star Pointer Bon Watts 

Roy D. Mayes Ramona. br m by Demonio Vernon McKinney 

R. J. MacKenzie May Mack, b m by Arthur Wilkes Anvil 

R. J. MacKenzie Bertha Carey, b m by Zombro Anvil 

R. J. MacKenzie Astro Harvester, b m by The Harvester Anvil 

R J. MacKenzie Eva G., b m by Zombro Vernon McKinney 

R. J. MacKenzie Zombro Bell, by Zombro Vernon McKinney 

R. I. Orr Benito B.. by Stam B Warren Dillon 

C. G. Owen Sister Mary, b m by Kinney Lou Arlie Demonio 

F. J. RuhstaUer Expedio. b m by Lijero Anvil 

Geo. F. Ryan Miss Harris, b m by Sidney Dillon Vernon McKinney 

W. L. Scott Lady Lou. ch m by Stanton Wilkes Wilbur Lou 

J. E. Short Melmonio. b m by Demonio Mona Ansel 

J. E. Short Honda Girl, b m by Cubino Skidoo Wilkes 

Jas. H. Spafford Libbie H.. ch m by Bronze McKinney. . .Royal McKinney 

A B. Spooner San Luis Bell, b m by McGinis Morris A. 

A. W. Sydnor Zona B.. by Zolock Copa de Oro 

Jas. Thompson Ruby, br m by The Bondsman Peter McKlyo 

Jas. Thompson Tennie Hall, br m by Moko Hall Peter McKlyo 

L. H. Todhunter Janet Bondsman, b m by The Bondsman Peter McKlyo 

L. H. Todhunter Leavinettie. b m by Zombro Peter McKlyo 

L H. Todhunter Osmuda. blk m by Bon Voyage Peter McKlyo 

D. W. Wallis Mary W.. sor m by Dictatus El Angelus 

G. Wempe Belle Alwin. b m by Lord Alwin Vernon McKinney 

G. Wempe Plumada, ch m by Advertiser Vernon McKinney 

M. L. Wov Strathalie. b m by Strathway Stanford McKinney 

M. L. Woy Loma B.. br m by Stam B Peter McKlyo 

M. L. Woy Florence B.. br m by Bon Voyage Stanford McKinney 

W. G. Durfee Atherine. b m by Patron Carlokin 

W. G. Durfee Helen Stiles, b m by Sidney Dillon Manrico 

W. G, Durfee Subito. b m by Steinway Copa de Oro 

W. G. Durfee Miss Carlokin. b ni by Carlokin Copa de Oro 



TRAINING AND TRACK TALK. 



Items Picked Up by a Breeder and Sportsman Repre- 
sentative on Trip Through the State. 



News from Woodland's New Half Mile Track. 

No doubt there are many horsemen in California 
who do not like to race their horses over half mile 
tracks and in many instances they are right, on ac- 
count of the way some of them have been built, with 
their long stretches and short, flat turns, but the new- 
track at Woodland is all that can be asked for in 
tho way of a two-lap ring. It has good saucer turns, 
an ample stretch, good and wide the whole w-ay 
around, and last but not least, the soil to make it 
fast. Charley Silva knew that he was making no 
mistake when he decided to make this change and 
with Lon Daniels in charge there will be work done 
here in the way of cleaning and fixing up that has 
been neglected for some time. At present the track 
is soft and all jogging is done on the road, and that's 
one of Woodland's best points. You can take a 
horse out any time after a rain and give him as many 
miles as you wish over some of the best dirt roads in 
the state. Silva has decided to give a meeting just 
before or after the Dixon May Day races. There will 
be some races for colts and the other classes will 
be made to suit the horses that race at Dixon. 

More than likeiy the Silva stable will be split this 
year, some going north over the northern and Cana- 
dian Circuits and the rest will stay here if there is 
the right kind of a circuit. If not, they will go East. 

Teddy Bear 2:05 is looking fine and is sure to go 
north this year, and Daniels says any horse that will 
beat him will have to step some. Bondeline (3) 
2: 06 '4 by The Bondsman, dam Katalina 2:11V4, is 
running in the paddock but will soon be taken up 
and commenced on. 

Quite a number of Teddy Bears will be raced this 
year. Merril (3), dam by Zombro, showed last year 
an eighth in :11% and a halt in 1:08. Raymond (3), 
dam by Whilestone. a quarter in :30i4. a half in 
l:08Vi. Little Jack (3). trotter, dam by Stam B., 
last year showed a quarter in :32, a mile in 2:24. 
Lon looks for this fellow to be some horse this com- 
ing year. 

Bypass, a five-year-old trotter by Lijero, dam by 
Stam B.. and Columbia T. 2:13>4 trotting, by Bon 
Guy, dam May T., are in good shape and should show- 
good this year. 

The following horses are still in pasture but will 
be taken up February 1st: Dixon Boy (p), time rec- 
ord at Fresno 2:08V4, stepped last year in 2:05% and 
2:05V4. Potrero Boy (p) 2:06V4, and John Malcolm 
(p) 2:111/4, driven a mile by Charley Silva in 2:04i4 
last year; Stanley Quinn (3), pacing 2:19Vi, by Dan 
Lo,?an, last year a quarter in :30V^, half in 1:01 an(l 
mile in 2:13. and San Felipe 2:09^4. trotter, who 
was beaten at Columbus last yearby an eyelash in 
2:0GVi. All will be put in shape and be ready when 
the time comes. 

Charley Johnson has a lot of as fine looking colts 
by his good race horse Airlie Demonio 2:05V4 as you 
will find in your travels any place on the coast, and 
the following broodmares of which Johnson has a 
number of high class ones, are in foal to him : Trixie 
Diablo, by Diablo 2: 09 '4. May Logan by Diablo, Star 
Logan by Star Pointer, Mista Lockheart by Lock- 
heart, Aleema by Nutwood Wilkes and Nutflower by 
Nutwood Wilkes. Airlie Demonio is looking in the 



best of shape and it would not take much to get him 
ready, but John.'r.on has decided to lay off this year 
and get him and some of his get ready for the follow- 
ing year. Trainer Ed Parker has four of the John- 
son horses at the track and he thinks well of all of 
them. The best liked one is Airlie Pointer (3) by 
Airlie Demonio 2:05'/4, dam by Star Pointer, second- 
dam Effio I.K)gan, dam of Jim and Dan Logan. Also 
a nice yearling by Airlie Demonio, dam May Logan, 
and May Demonio by Airlie Demonio, dam by Diablo. 

Hi Hogoboom is jogging several two and three- 
year-olds and he thinks he will find a couple of good 
ones among them. He has a nice tw-o-year-old pacer 
by Jim Logan, Lily of the Valley (3) 2:24%, another 
three-year-old trotter by Palo King and Rose King 
2:19 trotting, by Palo King. 

J. Elmo Montgomery drops over from Davis about 
every ten days. The old stand-by Jim Logan 2:01%, 
along with Lock Logan 2:07V4, will be raced again 
this year, but the best card will be the six-year-old 
pacer Hal Logan 2:09 by Jim Logan. This fellow 
war, three times second to Zombrino at Phoenix last 
fall in 2:07. and the way he was stepping when the 
races closed, it looks like there will be a pretty fast 
addition to the Jim Logan family. 

Sacramento Track News. 

Walt Tryon has returned from his eastern trip 
and expects to close a deal later on for something 
good. The following record horses in his string and 
all the property of Mr. S. H. Cowell are looking good 
and being jogged daily: Rastus 2:04% pacing, and 
the trotters John Mac 2:12V6 and Alhaloma 2:08%. 
Walt looks for the last named to be a real good 
horse this year. The green pacer Mountain Dee by 
Charley D. did a mile in 2:11 last year. The two 
three-year-olds by Peter the Great, filly and colt, and 
a green mare by Bingen all have the appearance of 
having "the goods" with them. Tryon also has Sam 
Gault's three-year-old colt by Peter McKlyo 2:06, and 
a green pacing mare by Demonio 2:11% owned by 
G. W. Davis of Vacaville. This Demonio mare has 
shown a mile in 2:11. 

William Ivey will get his mare Sister Patrice by 
Lijero ready ths year. She showed well as a three- 
year-old, having been a mile that year in 2:18. 

J. B. Stetson, who now has charge of the horses 
owned by the Midway Stock Farm of Kearney, Ne- 
braska, is wintering here and has some very classy 
looking yearlings, four of them being by Robert Bin- 
gen, out of high class broodmares. The others in 
the stable are Hal Royal, a pacer by Hal B. 2:04%, 
that acts like a very fast horse, the trotter Adiola 
Mack by McKinney, Joe Watkins, a trotter by Ken- 
tucky Todd, dam by Moko, and the three-year-old 
pacer Santa Clara by Demonio 2:11%, all in good 
shape and condition. Stetson has the pacer Gray 
Hal, a full brother to Hal Gray 2:08 and Gray Ghost 
2:11% by Hal B., owned by C. A. Harrison of Seattle, 
and the six-year-old pacer Palita by Palite owned by 
Dr. Haile of Sacramento. Mr. Stetson says that 
when Warren Dennis, of Farmington, Utah, bought 
Hal Regent by Hal B. out of a mare by Vice Regent, 
from C. A. Harrison, he got one of the best three- 
year-old Hal B.'s that he has seen in a long time. 

Jim Thompson has but two of Mr. Todhunter's 
horses at the track, Peter McKlyo 2:06 by Peter the 
Great 2:07% and the three-year-old colt by Gen. 
Watts, dam Zom Bell. The rest of the horses are at 
the home farm at present and it has not yet been 



decided how many will be sent to the track. Thomp- 
son has two very fine looking fillies, one by The 
Northern Man 2:06% and the other by Tregantle 
2:09%. The Tregantle filly has been a mile in 2:25 
as a two-year-old. Thompson's Gen. Watts colt Bon 
Watts, now a three-year-old, is a grand looking 
youngster and with his breeding will surely be 
heard from later on. L. 

o 

NEW RULES FOR HARNESS RACING. 



American and National Associations Agree on Rules 
for 1917 and Make Them Mandatory. 



The joint rules committee of the American and 
National Trotting Associations met at Columbus, 
Ohio, January 3d and adopted a set of rules which 
will govern both associations during 1917 and until 
the next meeting of the congress of both associa- 
tions. An official report of the details of the rule 
session shows that a large number of changes have 
been made, but as this report was received on Thurs- 
day of this week a full account of the same cannot be 
published in this week's Breeder and Sportsman. 

Last year many horses raced under a rule of the 
American association which permitted horses requir- 
ing winrace records prior to July 8th to get no bar. 
This rule will not prevail henceforth. The old rule 
which gave a horse making a winrace record on a 
mile track, four seconds allowance in races on halt 
mile tracks still stands, but there are no other allow- 
ances except the following: 

"After a horse has a winrace record he shall be 
allowed, whether raced or not. one second for each 
calendar year until he equals or reduces his record." 

This rule is expected to bring to the front many an 
old horse that was marked for life in his youth and 
has never been able to equal his record since. Thus 
any horse that took a mark of 2:10 five years ago 
and has not equaled that record since will be per- 
mitted to start in the 2:15 class this year. 

In all purse races the number of entries required 
to fill must be stated in the advertised conditions and 
the definition of purses and stakes is clearly defined. 

All races in the future will be to a finish. Instead 
of a varied system of conducting races there will be 
three styles, namely, the two in three, three-heat and 
three-in-five systems. 

In the two in three heat plan a horse to get first 
money must win two heats. Horses not standing 
for money after the third heat are ruled out. 

In the three in five heat plan the winner must win 
three heats. Horses not standing for money after 
four heats go to the bam. After the fifth heat only 
heat winners start, unless two horses have two heats 
apiece, in which event they only shall start. 

The three-heat plan is an event to end with the 
three heats, the horses standing best in the summary 
being declared the winner and the recipient of 10 
per cent of the purse in addition to first money. In 
case of an absolute tie a fourth heat will be required. 
Every horse hereafter must be entered in the name 
of his Owner or owners. A syndicate may have its 
stable name registered and may use that in place of 
names of individuals. 

In all races for two and three-year-olds the dis- 
tance has been made 100 yards on half mile tracks 
and eighty yards on mile tracks. 

All rules aje mandatory and neither association 
shall recognize special allowances by any track asso- 
ciations. 



Saturday, January 13, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



Notes and News 



Give your stallion more of an opportunity by ad- 
vertising him. Keep his name before the public. 

❖ 

The meeting of secretaries and track managers 
for the purpose of forming a California harness rac- 
ing circuit will be held next Tuesday in this city. 

❖ <$> ❖ 

Peter Wilton, the son of Peter the Great that 
Havis James had at Pleasanton during the season of 
1911, won the championship of all breeds at the 
horse show held at Guelph, Ontario, last month. 

❖ ❖ ♦ 

Harry S. Neally, racing secretary of the New York 
State Fair, has already drafted his program of early 
closers for the Grand Circuit meeting, subject to 
such changes as the action of the stewards at the 
Atlanta meeting may require. 

❖ ♦ 

The North Pacific Fair Association has abolished 
the early closing purse . Entries to its races will not 
close until August 1st. This will suit the horse 
owners, and there should be a much larger percent- 
age of starters than under the old plan. 

A payment of SlO will be due Thursday, February 
1st, on all two-year-olds entered in Pacific Breeders' 
Futurity No. 15, which is for foals of 1915. This 
stake has a value of $5,150. Better not let February 
1st go by without making this payment. 

Lucille Spier 2:03Vi has been insured for $30,000 
in The Two Hartfords. If you desire to know all 
about horse insurance in these companies write to 
Mr. Roland C. Drake, Assistant General Agent, 438 
California street, San Francisco. All good horses 
should be insured. 

<S> <$> <S> 

Harry J. S. 2:071/4, the pony trotter that forced 
Richa-rd Delafleld's Al Mack out in 2:08% and 2:09V2 
over the half mile track at Goshen last summer, is 
now credited with thirty-two winning races and earn- 
ings of $17,130. He has started fifty-eight times in 
the last six years and has won a part of the purse 
in all but three of his races. 

Baron Robin Hood 2: 10 14, purchased by J. D. Gal- 
lery of Pittsburg, after trotting a mile in 2:06 in his 
work as a three-year-old last season, is to be a mem- 
ber of Thomas W. Murphy's campaigning stable this 
year. The colt is a son of Baron Review, sire of 
Murphy's first Futurity winner, Baroness Virginia 
2:0814. 

<S> ^ <S> 

That Volga 2:04i^ will yet prove to be the fastest 
trotter of her wonderful family, which includes Peter 
Volo 2:02, her full brother, is the belief of some 
astute Kentucky horsemen. Though trained as a 
two-year-old, she has always been carefully handled, 
and her physical condition is said to be as good as 
if she had never worn a harness. Ben White, who 
drove her to her record, is wintering her at Thomas- 
ville, Ga. 

❖ ♦ ♦ 

Allie Watts 2:07%, by General Watts 2-J)&M, has 
trotted forty-two races of more than one hundred 
and twenty-five heats in her last campaigns, winning 
twenty-two times and finishing behind the money 
only twice. Her three-year-old campaign, in which 
she trotted twenty-one races, winning nine of them, 
is said to be without a parallel for a trotter of this 
age. Fred Edman, of Jonesville, La., developed and 
drove her. 

❖ ♦ ♦ 

Walter R. Cox says that Mabel Trask 2:03^4 is the 
most intelligent animal of the genus equus that he 
has ever seen. "It isn't necessary to urge her when 
another horse comes to her," he said recently, "nor 
is it necessary to take her back when she has the 
race won. She seems to know by instinct just when 
to speed and when to conserve her energy. She 
drives herself with as much judgment as I or any 
other human being could drive her." 

« «> * 

The Stanislaus county board of supervisors will 
probably purchase the land adjoining the city of 
Modesto on which the county fair was held last year, 
and the fair will be made a permanent institution. 
The land consists of 103 city blocks, and is offered 
to the county for $12,250. If the board purchases 
the land, permanent buildings and stock sheds will 
be constructed. The board will al.so appoint a fair 
commission, under whose direction future fairs will 
be held. 

Geo. W Iiowery has received word from "Tommy," 
who hap. been the caretaker of Spriggan 2:08'/i for 
several years past, that the $20,000 stake winner has 
not had a blanket on all winter, although he is pass- 
ing through the season in the stables of Lon McDon- 
ald at Indianapolis, and has a coat of hair on him 
that would make a polar bear envious. The son of 
Baron McKinnoy is now in perfect health and Mc- 
Donald will begin jogging him as soon as the weather 
permits. Spriggan will be an acclimated trotter 
when the Grand Circuit opens and Mr. Lowery hopes 
to see him trotting in his 1915 form again. 



The American Horse Breeder of Boston says Bos- 
ton had a Christmas tree for horses. A huge ever- 
green WIS placed in PostofTice Square, where carrots, 
apples, sugar and a lot of other "goodies" were dis- 
tributed among hundreds of animals, while coffee was 
served to the drivers. 

«> ♦ «> 

J. D. Galley of Pittsburg, who at the Chicago sale 
last month purchased Hermes 2:13Vi, winner of 
three three-year-old stakes in California last year, 
will use the son of Carlokin as a matinee horse. 
And C. A. Durfee, who drove him in all his races 
last year, says Hermes is a good enough trotter to 
race anywhere in his class. ' 

<S> <?> 

C. K. G. Billings, of New York, is .spending a few 
months at Santa Barbara and has had expressed to 
him there eight automobiles and seven head of his 
favorite riding horses, among them the world's cham- 
pion trotting gelding Uhlan 1:58, California B. 
2:14^^, world's champion under saddle on a half 
mile track, and several other fast horses. Mr. Bil- 
lings has taken the beautiful Graham residence at 
Santa Barbara for the winter. 

♦ ♦ ❖ 

Many important sales of high class live stock have 
recently been made through the office of D. O. Lively 
of San Francisco. Mr. Lively has sent Poland-China 
hogs to South American points; two Holstein bulls 
to Nicaragua; two jennets, thirteen Polled Ram- 
bouillet sheep and a Shorthorn bull to the Hawaiian 
Islands. Local sales have included three cars of 
stock hogs to go to the rice fields and 106 head of 
grade Shorthorn cows to W. J. Hammon. 

<8> <«> ^ 

T. D. Sexton, the popular Oakland contractor, 
owner of Future Tramp 2:09%, had a narrow escape 
from death a few days ago when a plank broke on 
which he was walking in the new Breuner building, 
now in course of construction in Oakland. Mr. Sex- 
ton fell about fifteen feet, striking on his head and 
shoulders, tnd when picked up was unconscious. He 
is out again attending to business as usual, but will 
feel the effects of the fall for some time. 

❖ <$> ♦ 

E. D. Dudley, one of the progressive stockmen of 
the Sacramento Valley, whose fertile ranch is near 
Dixon, sold 26 Duroc-Jersey shoats to J. I. Thompson, 
of the State Farm at Davis, this week. Prof. Thomp- 
son bought the pigs for experimental feeding at the 
farm. They were from good sows and by a pure-bred 
boar. Mr. Dudley, who formerly engaged quite ex- 
tensively in the breeding of trotters, has recently 
devoted his time to the breeding and feeding of high 
class live stock. His farm is well stocked with the 
best herds of sheep, cattle and swine. 

* ♦ 

Dick McMahon, when at Pleasanton recently, 
offered $1250 for Dunne & Lowery's mare Peter's 
Queen by Peter the Great, that Millard Sanders is 
training . This daughter of Peter the Great is win- 
tering nicely and gives every prospect of being a 
good mare for the trotting classes this year. While 
her owners feel she is worth more money than Mc- 
Mahon offered for her, they were complimented that 
a trainer of his experience should offer that amount 
for the daughter of Peter the Great. 

^- ^ ^ 

The Yolo County Fair, already advertised as "the 
Biggest Little Fair in California," has selected Aug- 
ust 29th to September 1st, inclusive, as the tentative 
dates of its fair this year. This fair association pro- 
poses to hold the best live stock exhibit ever made 
at any district fair in California. Already applica- 
tions for space have come in from Stanislaus, San 
Joaquin, Sacramento^ Glenn and Yolo county farmers 
and from the Alameda and San Francisco chambers 
of commerce and the California Development Associ- 
ation. The fair will be held at the Woodland Fair 
Grounds, now owned by Charles Silva. and on which 
he is constructing a first-class half mile track. 
<$> <S> <$> 

Mr. H. E. Middleton, of Oakdale, Stanislaus county, 
is the owner of two fine mares, full sisters, ten and 
eleven years old, respectively — Miss Zom B. and 
Antie Oak, by Zombro 2:11, dam I-ady Van Nuys by 
Stam B. 2:11%, second dam Whisper, the dam of 
Zombro, by Almont Lightning. Both mares are reg- 
istered, and he owns a three-year-old colt by Best 
Policy out of Lady Zom B. that trainer Frank is giv- 
ing lessons to at Pleasanton. This colt is a trotter 
and shows a lot of speed. Mr, Middleton will have 
him registered this month and one glance at his 
pedigree shows that he is one of the best bred young- 
sters now in training in California . 

<$> ^ ^ 

A. Edstrom, of Oakland, who bred Vera Hal 2:05, 
Roan Hal 2:18V4. and several others that have fa.st 
records, will probably take his pacer Hallie's Star 
to the Stockton (rack to train him for the California 
circuit this year. Mr. Edstrom is only waiting for 
the announcement of such a circuit to move his 
horse to the Stockton track. Ilallic's Star is a free 
going pacer and has worked a mile in 2:15 with the 
last quarter in 30 >^ seconds. He is by Star Pointer 
1:59% out of Sweet Hallie by American Hal and has 
never been regularly raced, but took a time record of 
2:24% when a three-year-old and has started in a few 
matinee races . He was foaled in 1910. Probably 
he is the most intensely bred pacing stallion on the 
Pacific Coast, as he is from a ipacing ancestry on 
both sides of his pedigree. 



Frank D. MacGregor, who has conducted a success 
ful livery :ind sale stable in Santa Rosa for forty 
years or more, has sold out the business to his son, 
William W. MacGregor. who has been associated 
with him for the past three years. The son has 
add^d an automobile garage to the business, the 
property being ideally located and arranged for this 
addition. Driving and saddle horses will be kept on 
hand as usual for those who like to ride or drive and 
in addition an up-to-date automobile garage will be 
conducted. The many friends of Frank MacGregor 
will wish him long lif(- and good health for the re- 
mainder of his days and will be glad to know that 
he retires with a fine home and a competency thai 
will keep him comfortable during the rest of his life, 
which should be a long time as he is still in good 
health and has a "long expectancy," as the insurance 
men say. Th(^y will also wish the son much success. 
* <$> ❖ 

William Stuart, the Humboldt county trainer who 
has been located at Santa Rosa for the past two 
years, is sp(>nding a few weeks in San Francisco 
while his horses are "just loafing," and is keen to 
have a California circuit this year as he wants to 
race here. He took in the Inter-Mountain circuit last 
year and says it v;as a big success all the way 
through. He also says that Joseph Waddell, who 
was the circuit managing secretary, is the right man 
to manage a circuit, and he hopes California can 
secure his services. Mr. Stuart had three horses in 
his string last year, started in 23 races and was never 
outside the money. He raced Emelino Dillon 2:10%, 
Potreress 2:13i/4 and Bonnie Quinn 2:12, but the 
last named was off and did not win any races. Stu- 
art thiiiks Eineline Dillon (breeder's record 2:07%) 
IS good enough to win in her class anywhere. She 
is eligible to the 2:11 pacing class on mile tracks, 
and is a well bred one, being by Guy Dillon, one of 
the best bred stallions in America, and out of a mare 
by John L., a son of Anteeo. 

<^ ♦ 

C. A. Harrison of Seattle, who seldom lets a month 
go by that he does not buy or sell a trotter or pacer, 
writes that he has shipped to Warren Dennis at 
Farmington, Utah, the bay four-year-old pacing geld- 
ing Hal Regent by Hal B. 2:04%, dam Almota, a pro- 
ducing mare by Vice Regent, brother to Heir at Law, 
second dam Antonia, great brood mare by Election- 
eer, third dam Columbine, the dam of Anteeo, Ante- 
volo, etc., by A. W. Richmond. Mr. Harrison adds: 
"Hal Regent is a most perfectly made horse, besides 
being a very choicely bred one, is a fast, free-legged 
pacer and has never been 'honed.' Mr. Dennis 
bought the horse without coming to look at him, and 
it will be a source of sincere pleasure to me for this 
young horse to make good for Mr. Dennis. If no 
accident happens him Vice Regent will make good 
as Warren Dennis is a successful trainer and race 
driver. He has about fourteen horses in his stable 
at Lagona Park, situated about midway between Og- 
den and Salt Lake. Lou Childs purchased Oregon 
Hal 2:0914 from Mr. Dennis for Tommy Murphy and 
it did not take Dennis long to fill Oregon Hal's stall 
with another Hal B. pacer, which goes to show that 
he thinks well of those money getting Hal B.'s. I 
also sold Joseph Ansel (3) 2:12V^, a pacing gelding 
by Prince Ansel, dam Josie D. by Nutwood Wilkes, 
to R. H. Ball, of Mount Vernon, Washington. Mr. 
Ball's horses ar(> being wintered at the Burlington, 
Washington, track. 

o 

Notable Performances in 1916. 

Two performances of superlative merit made the 
harness racing campaign of 1916 a memorable one. 
The first and greatest of these was the mile in 
1:58% trotted by the five-year-old stallion Lee Ax- 
worthy at Lexington. Ky., on October 7th. This is 
nearly three seconds faster than the record of any 
other stallion, and lacks only a quarter of a second 
of matching the world's record made by Uhlan (1:58) 
on the same track in 1912. Only one stallion in the 
history of the trotting turf has equaled the record 
held by the fastest mare or gelding of his day. Lee 
Axworthy's record is the fastest ever made by a five- 
y<>ar-old. and is likewise the only unstarred record 
of 2:00 or better yet made by any trotting horse ex- 
cept Uhlan. 

On the same day and track on which Lee Axworthy 
lowered the stallion record and the five-year-old rec- 
ord The Real Lady won the final heat of a sweep- 
takes race for two year-old trotters in 2:04%, which 
is the fastest time ever made by a (rotter of her age. 
The previous record was 2:04Vz, made by Peter Volo 
in 1913. 

The fastest three-year-old trotter of 1916 was Volga 
2:0414, full sister to Peter Volo, whose 2:03i^ is the 
best on record at that age. The fastest four-year-old 
was Mary Putney 2:04%, that ranked as the fastest 
three-year-old of 1915. The largest money winning 
trotter was Mabel Trask 2:03%, whose earnings total 
$33,720. The six-year-old daughter of Peter the Great 
2:07''!. in fourteen weeks trotted sixteen races of 
fifty-two heats, the average time of which was 2: 06 14. 
Nine of these heats were faster than 2:05 and five 
were faster llian 2:04. 

The most notable performance of the season by a 
pacer was Poor Man's mile in 2:07% as a two-year- 
old. This equals the best record for pacer.s of this 
age, Hemet Queer. 2:16% was the fastest yearling 
of 1916; I'l-ter Ix)ok 2:03, the fastest three-year-old, 
and Miss Harris M. 2:01 1/1 the fastest four-year-old. 
The fastest record made by a mature pacer was Na- 
poleon Direct's 1:59%. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1917 




ROD. GUN AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTKD BY FISHER HUNT | 



Duck Banded in Utah. — The log-banded teal shot 
recently by Chris Krenipel on the Chico Land and 
Water Club grounds in Orange county was tagged in 
Utah August 20, last, and goes to prove a contention 
that I he Utah and Nevada birds come down this way. 

In a letter to the Fish and Game Commission, E. 
W. Nelson .Chief of the Biological Survey, writes re- 
garding this teal: 

"The bird is one that was captured near the mouth 
of Bear River, Utah, while suffering from the sick- 
ness prevalent among water fowl in that vicinity. 
The bird was brought in to our field laboratory, there 
cured by treatment with Iresh water, and on August 
20. 1916, it was banded and released. Its subsequent 
recovery not far from Los Angeles constitutes an 
interesting record. This duck sickness is similar to 
the trouble found during recent years at Tulare Lake 
in your State. A considerable number of wild ducks 
have been cured and banded before released in Utah. 
It is interesting to note that your record is the sec- 
ond that has come in from Orange county, California. 
Should any other banded birds come to your atten- 
tion, I trust vou will iniform us immediately." 

United States Field Trials.— The United States 
Field Trial.« opened on January 2nd. The Breeder 
and Sportsman will have a report of the big events 
ne.xt week. The winners, according to press reports, 
were as follows: 

Grand Junction, Tenn., Jan. 3. — Mary Montrose, a 
pointer owned by Wm. Ziegler of New York and 
handled by Robert Armstrong of Barber, N. C, today 
won the derby of the United State.s Field Trials Club, 
run over the club'S course here. The pointer Concho 
Dick, entered by C. E. Duffield of Tulsa, Okla., was 
a warded second place and Master Peg, a setter 
owned by Dr. Ward Akester of Marshall, Minn., third. 
Twenty-six dogs competed. 

Grand Junction. Tenn., Jan. 6. — Joe Muncie, setter, 
owned by Benjamin Weil of Alexandria, La., and 
handled by J. M. Avent, Hickory Valley, Tenn., was 
declared the winner of the United States Field Trial 
Club's all-age stake yesterday. 

Lewis C. Morris, pointer, owned by Louis Haggin, 
Lexington, Ky., was second , and Square Edges, 
owned by J. R. McMillan, Lodi, Wis., third. 

QG 

One-Buck Season. — Most deer hunters who really 
want to preserve the species for future sport are 
coming to favor a one-buck seasonal limit, forked- 
horns the minimum size, and argue that, while a 
one-buck limit is easy to enforce, permitting a man 
to shoot two adds great difficulties to the work of 
the game warden in which every deputy fish and 
game commissioner concurs. Owing to their slow 
reproduction and abundant natural enemies, even 
large reserved districts will fail to restore the sport 
except in specially-favorable sections, and the way 
bucks have held out against improved equipment, 
rapid transportaiion and an increase of hunting in- 
terest beyond precedent continues to amaze men 
whose hearts are attuned to the "call of the wild." 
% 

Judges For Westminster Show. — Nine additional 
judges have been selected, which completes the list 
for the Westmint^ter Kennel Club's annual bench 
show at Madison Square Garden, February 20 to 23, 
inclusive. They include William Faversham, who 
will take the bull terriers; Frank Walker of London, 
England, for bulldogs, a bi-eed in which he is pre- 
eminent and which was last judged by him at the 
Richmond, England, championship show, and Mrs. 
F. y. Mathias for the I'ekingese. 

Mrs. William F. Stevens of New York will judge 
the pugs . The other appointments are: Great Danes, 
Paul C. Blass; Greyhounds, Henry D. Whitfield; 
French bulldogs, John E. Haslem; Sporting Span- 
iel.s, William R. Lowe, all well-known New Yorrk ex- 
perts, and Charl'js D. Barney of New Bedford, Mass., 
who will take the American foxhounds. 

% 

At State Game Farm. — Little effort has been made 
to continue the introduction of foreign game birds 
at the State game farm, according to the Biennial 
report made by the Fish and Game Commission. 
Believing that sufficient attempts have been made 
to stock the state with ring-necked pheasants, and 
that the game tarni has not proved its worth, the 
efforts at propagation on the farm have been cur- 
tailed. Consequently, but few ring-necked pheasants 
have been reared, and only a few hundred birds have 
been liberated. In order that breeders might be 
furnished information as to the possibilities in quail 
and duck breeding, the farm has been stocked with 
valley quail and wild ducks and experiments carried 
on to determine the success which can be obtained 
jn artificially rearing them. The main justification 
for a game farm appears to lie in its value as a sta- 
tion for carrying on breeding experiments, the results 
of which will benefit game breeders, rather than in 
its value as a practical means of increasing game. 
Judging from the experience of other states it seems 



best that the greater amount of effort be placed on 
the conservation of native species rather than on the 
introduction of foreign, ones which are apt to sup- 
plant valuable native species, or introduce some 
infectious disease. The breeding stock at the Game 



Farm on July 1, 1916, was as follows: 

Valley quail .including young stock 250 

Mountain quail 15 

Bobwhite quail 20 

Golden pheasants. Including young stock 17 

Silver pheasants .including young stock 14 

Ring-necked pheasants, including young stock 140 

Ducks (13 species, including fulvous tree-ducks) 575 

Geese (4 species) 9 

Coots 10 

Great blue heron l 



Total birds 1,151 

Black-tailed deer 2 

Mexican white-tailed deer 1 



Total manmials 3 



FISHING TRIP TO HAWAIIAN ISLANDS. 



J. W. Jump and Family Will Take Over Motor Boat 
to Enjoy Sport. 



A motor boat trip with a kick to it is what J. W. 
Jump of Los Angeles has mapped out for himself and 
family during the next three or four months. Not 
content with hunting the festive tuna and albicore in 
local waters, Mr. Jump has decided to invade the 
game-abounding coasts of the Hawaiian Islands. And 
he will not tackle the deep sea fish in a hired motor 
boat. He is taking his own boat with him. 

Fishing parties are not unusual objects around 
the Hawaiian Islands. But though most of the ang- 
lers take their own tackle, lines, hooks, etc., with 
them, very few have the nerve to include their favor- 
ite boat in the equipment. Mr. Jump has it on 'em 
all. His outfit will include everything from an 18- 
ton launch to the best two-ply gut leaders on the 
market. Tne whole works is to be shipped across on 
the s'eamship Moana and we'd hate to pay the freight 
bili. 

Mr. Jump's launch, the Sea Scout, is a forty-foot 
boat and would have little trouble in making the 
trip acrosi- the ocean itself. But in oider to save 
time and trouble it is to be placed aboard the Manoa 
and put into use after it reaches the islands. 

"We will motor up to San Francisco and then put 
the Scout on board the Manoa," said Mr. Jump this 
week. "Capt. K. S. Walker will accompany us on 
the trip and will navigate the boat as far as San 
Francisco, ^^'hen we reach Honolulu, we will simply 
travel around and will spend at least a couple of 
months giving the Hawaiian fishing the once over. 

"It's hard to beat the fi.^hing around the Hawaiian 
Islands. There are so many varieties of fish around 
those beaches that you can't keep track of them. All 
our local fish are represented and there are countless 
other specimens. In fact, they've got everything 
from the playful dolphin to pompano weighing 200 
pounds. 

"There are two particular species of fish that we 
hope to catch. These are the ono and ulua. And, 
believe me, they are some fish. The ono looks like 
the local surf fish, except for the fact that it weighs 
about 100 pounds. It is as game as any fish afloat 
and will put up a fight that will make your hair 
stand on end. 

"The ulua is on the order of a pompano. except 
that it also is greatl yenlarged. Many of these weigh 
200 pounds. There are several other kinds of these 
monsters and we expect to have plenty of sport." 

Mr. and Mrs. Jump, their two children and Capt. 
K. S. Walker will start on their unique fishing ex- 
pedition in a couple of weeks. 

Champions of 1916 — State Champions (Profes- 
sional) — E. R. Galvin, Wilmington, Delaware. 

National Amateur— Frank M. Troeh, Vancouver, 
Wash. 

*Grand American Handicap — Captain John F. 
Wulf, Milwaukee, Wis. 

*Southern Handicap — F. C. Koch, Phillipsburg, O. 

*Western Handicap — E. F. Gibbs, Canker City, 
Kans. 

"Eastern Handicap — Clarence B. Piatt, Bridgeton, 
N. J. 

♦Pacific Coast Handicap — Frank B. Templeton, 
Portland, Ore. 

'National Doubles — Allen Heil, Allentown, Pa. 

*Open Doubles — George Nicolai, Kansas City, Mo. 

Open Amateur (200 Targets)— Ralph H. Spotts, 
New Yor kCity. 

*U. S. S. Navy— F. P. Williams, U. S. S. Solace. 

All-Round Open — Homer Clark, Alton, 111. 

Ail-Round Amateur — Fred Plum, Atlantic City, 
N. J. 

*]8 Yards— G. N. Fish, Lindenville, N. Y. 
( *Amateur.) 



REVIEW OF HUNTING AND FISHING. 



Expert Points Out Prosperous Season That Was 
Enjoyed in California. 



[By Harold C. Bryant, Research Expert of the 
State Fish and Game Commission.] 

With enough fish planted from our hatcheries in 
191.? to supply every man, woman and child in the 
State with sixteen fish apiece, it is little wonder that 
all those who have sought the gamey trout this year 
have been rewarded. From all parts of the State 
favorable reports have come, and in many instances 
trout of remarkable size have been taken. Of par- 
ticular interest was the capture of a Loch Leven 
trout in the Owens river that weighed six and three- 
quarter pounds . Since this species was planted in 
the Owens river, but seven or eight years ago, this 
fish must have gained almost a pound in weight each 
year. 

Anglers in the bay region found the streams in 
the immediate vicinity depleted because of over- 
fishing .and consequently they had to go farther away 
from home. Those who did go, however, reported 
excellent sport. Bear Valley lakes in the San Ber- 
nardino mountains furnished excellent sport to 
Southern California anglers. 

The season for big game opened auspiciously and 
the kill for the year was well up to normal. All deer 
hunters who knew where to go succeeded in obtain- 
ing at least one buck, and most of the experienced 
hunters obtained the limit. The killing of several 
very large mule deer in the eastern part of the state 
has been reported. 

All hunters agree that the new spiked buck law, 
passed at the 1915 Legislature, has done a great deal 
for the protection, not only of doer, but of the hunt- 
ers themselves. Judging from reports, fewer hunting 
accidenrs occurred this last year than ever before. 
The protected species of big game, such as mountain 
sheep and elk. have about held their own, but the 
bands of antelope in Lassen and Modoc counties are 
reported to be decreasing rather than increasing. 
Small game, rabbits in particular, have been so abun- 
dant that much complaint of their depredations has 
been heard. 

Due to a number of causes, the season on wild fowl 
was a marked improvement over that of last year. 
Ducks and geese have been abundant everywhere, 
and many hunters attribute the increased numbers 
to the Federal migratory bird law. The occurrence 
of large numbers of whistling swans, of such ducks 
as the bufflehead and golden-eye in the Sacramento 
valley, and of snowy owls throughout the northern 
sections of the State, would argue that weather con- 
ditions and food supply have also been factors in 
the increased numbers of wild fowl appearing during 
this last season. Limits have been the rule, and 
to the good fortune of the hunter these limits have 
been made up largely of the most desirable species. 
More mallards were taken in Southern California 
than tor many years past. 

Newspaper reports on quail hunting have uni- 
formly proclaimed a rather poor season. The rea- 
sons advanced have been various, Lut every one must 
admit that quail are far less numerous than they 
were twenty years ago, and that this diminution in 
numbers has been one of the prominent reasons for 
the poor luck experienced by quail hunters. Moun- 
tain quail also have been scarce and hard to obtain. 

The fact that fish and game is still abundant is 
proved by the large numbers of licenses. Nearly 
158,000 licensed hunters and 89„000 anglers have 
taken the field this last year. These hunters and 
anglers probably sp<>nd for equipment, traveling ex- 
penses, etc., about $20,000,000 annually. This does 
not take into account the value of the game and fish 
as food. The deer kill alone is worth not less than 
$200,000. It can be seen, therefore, that California's 
resources in fish and game form an asset worth many 
millions of dollars. The State can, therefore, be con- 
gr.-itulated that, in spite of the waste of the past, 
sufficient firh and game still remain for sportsmen. 

9B 

risherman Sleeps in Peace. — The dead sleep 
sweetest where they have been happiest. So thought 
August Raht, whom the Great Spirit called on Christ- 
mas day. 

For many years Raht had fished and hunted in 
California, and the happiest days of his closing years 
were those days spent in an open boat off Santa 
Cruz, trolling for salmon. In the launch of Arthur 
Guggins, each morning at 4 a. m. during the salmon 
seri.^on, Raht would start for the fishing banks. There 
the v. hole day would be spent, and night time would 
find the craft loaded deep with fat. pink salmon. 

Those days, out on the opeii sea and filled with 
recollections of flashing sides and whipping winds, 
were Raht's happiest days. 

When his 74 years became heavy on his shoulders 
he would tell his friends that in death he wished to 
rest where he had been happiest — off the heads at 
Santa Cruz. 

On Sunday his daughters, Mrs. Mary Elkins and 
Mrs. Ella Marsh of Denver, will get into Guggin's 
weather-beaten fishing boat and sail beyond the 
heads. Over the channels where the old fisherman 
took his biggest salmon the ashes will be scattered. 

August llaht will sleep where be was happiest — 
off the heads at Santa Cruz, 



Saturday, January 13, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



TRAPSHOOTING HAD ITS GREATEST YEAR. 



More Than 700 New Clubs Were Organized and Over 
50,000 Joined the "Pull," "Bang," "Puff" Army. 



Trapshooting is now enjoying the full flush of pop- 
ularity. Nineteen hundred and sixteen was the great- 
est of all years for the "sport alluring." 

During the year on which Father Time has closed 
his books, birth was given to 737 trapshooting clubs, 
an increase of 40 per cent over 1915 — the best previ- 
ou.s year: in the 501 registered tournaments reported 
10,528 diflerent shooters took part, an increase of 
33 1-3 per cent over 1915; beginners' day events at- 
tracted 11,625 novices to the traps as against the 
1915 high watfr mark of 7506, and registered tourna- 
ments n\inibered 546, an increase of 35 per cent. 

Championships were shot and decided in 46 States, 
against 38 the previous year. Conservative figures 
show that more than 50,000 new members were added 
to the trapshooting fraternity before the ledgers 
were closed for the year. 

Trapshooting has been gaining many friends and 
devotees for the past half dozen years, and during 
that period it has grown faster than any American 
sport. No sport is excepted in this declaration. Some 
half dozen years ago there were a few more than 
100,000 trapshooters in the United States and Can- 
ada. Now there are nearly 600,000. In the same 
period trapshooting clubs have multiplied from 497 
to 4,666, of which 4.108 are active in the promotion 
of the sport. 

Gaining by leaps and bounds doesn't begin to ex- 
press the marvelous growth of trapshooting. It is 
not the National Pastime, but it is a close second. 
More people each year are going in for the sport that 
they cart play themselves, and as every American 
desires to owu a gun and shoot, trapshooting is get- 
ting its quota. And every shooter is a booster for 
the sport that knows no season. It is played all 
the year. 

Any sport that can come along like trapshooting 
must have a good foundation. No sport can suc- 
ceed — no matter how much advertising or publicity 
it receives — if it hasn't the goods. The sport of 
trapshooting is supervised by the Interstate Associa- 
tion for the Encouragement of Trapshooting, ably as- 
sisted by the American Amateur Trapshooters' As- 
sociation. 

The Interstate Association frames the rules, man- 
ages the Grand American handicap tournament — 
and subsidiary tournaments, aids in the formation 
of State associations, and gives about $25,000 each 
year for trophies, which are awarded to the winning 
trapshooters in the registered tournaments. The In- 
terstate Association is even more important to the 
welfare of trapshooting than the National Commis- 
sion is to baseball. 

The American Amateur Trapshooters' Association 
works along lines that do not conflict with the Inter- 
state Association, yet aids greatly in the develop- 
ment ot the sport. Thirty-eight State organizations, 
1272 clubs and 60,000 individuals hold membership 
in the A. A. T. A. The idea is to have every trap- 
shooter in the world on the membership list of the 
A. A. T. A. 

This may be news to you, but it is a fact neverthe- 
less: More money is invested in trapshooting in 
the United States and Canada than in baseball or 
any other outdoor sport — excepting golf. Trapshoot- 
ing clubs do not require the same finely kept lawns 
that the golfers do — nor do they go in for such ex- 
pensive club houses. 

It may be a surprise to you, also, to know that it 
costs nearly as much in coin of the realm to stage 
the Grand American handicap tournament as it does 
to manage the World Series in baseball. And in pass- 
ing it might be mentioned that trapshooters last year 
spent $4,000,000 for clay targets and shells, and 
$2,000,000 more in car fare, hotel bills, etc., so that 
they could participate in the various tournaments — 
and 96 per cent of the trapshooters pay all of their 
own expenses. 

As trapshooting progresses the quality of the shoot- 
ers improves. In the State championships in 1914 
only two shooters broke 100 targets, in 1915 three 
had clean scores, while this past year seven broke 
100 targets, eight broke 99 and eleven broke 98. In 
one State Championship tournament five men tied 
for the honor at 99. This, more than anything else, 
shows the quality now interested in pulverizing the 
clays. 

Trapshooting schools and beginners' days have 
done a world of good for the King of Sports. The 
first trapshooting school was opened on th(! Million 
Dollar Piei, Atlantic City, N. J. This opened on 
March 27th and closed November 18th. During that 
time 5,122 persons fired 249,125 shells at the .same 
number of targets. In the above attendance figures 
there are 248" men and 290 women who never before 
shot over the traps. — [By Peter P. Carney, Phila., Pa. 

ac 

4666 Trapshooting Clubs. — There are 4666 trap- 
shooting clubs in the world: 4331 of them being in 
the good old U. S. A. This is about 4000 more clubs 
than there were a decade ago. The appended table, 
showing the number of clubs in the various States 
and countries, gives sportsmen a lot of food for 
thought and furnishes an idea of how popular a sport 
trapshooting is: 

Alabama 24, Alaska 9, Arizona 14, Arkansas 30, 
California 130, Colorado 44, Connecticut 48, Cuba 7, 
Delaware 22, Denmark 1, District of Columbia 6, Flor- 



ida 28. Georgia 32, Idaho 23, Illinois 306, Indiana 127, 
Iowa 258, Kansas 103, Kentucky 60, Louisiana 23, 
Maine 24, Maryland 64, Massachusetts 100, Mexico 

1, Michigan 147, Minnesota 181, Mississippi 21, Mis- 
souri 138, Montana 55, Nebraska 123, Nevada 10, New 
Hampshire 23, New Jersey 196, New Mexico 8, New 
Zealand 2, New York 384, North Carolina 34, North 
Dakota 59, Ohio 211, Oklahoma 59, Oregon 55, Pana- 
ma 2, Pennsylvania 552, Philippine Islands 2, Rhode 
Island 14, South America 3, South Carolina 19, South 
Dakota 51, Tennessee 25, Texas 80, Utah 14, Vermont 
23, Virginia 65, Washington 69, West Virginia 36, 
Wisconsin 192, Wyoming 20, Australia 3, Bahamas 

2, Canada 307, Hawaii 1, Honolulu 3, China 4. Total, 
4666. 

ae 

TRAPSHOOTING FIXTURES. 



May 8, 9, 10, 1917— Roanoke, Va. — The Interstate As- 
sociation's Twelfth Southern Trapshooting Tour- 
nament, under trie auspices of the Roanoke Gun 
Club; $1,000 added money. Winner of first place 
in the Southern Handicap guaranteed $100 and 
a trophy; winner of second place guaranteed $75 
and a trophy, and the winner of third place guar- 
anteed $50 and a trophy. Several other trophies 
will also be awarded. Elmer B. Shaner, Manager, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

May 28, 29, 30, 1917— San Jose, Cal.— The Interstate 
Association's Twelfth Pacific Coast Trapshooting 
Touruament, under the auspices of the San Jose 
Gun Club; $1300 added money. Winner of first 
place in the Pacific Coast Handicap guaranteed 
$100 and a trophy; winner of second place guar- 
anteed $75 and a trophy, and the winner of third 
place guaranteed $50 and a trophy. Several other 
trophies will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner, 
Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

June 20, 21, 22, 1917— Hartford, Conn.— The Inter- 
state Association's EJleventh Eastern Trapshooting 
Tournament, under the auspices of the Hartford 
Gun Club; $1000 added money. Winner of first 
place in the Eastern Handicap guaranteed $100 
and a trophy; winner of second place guaranteed 
$75 and a trophy, and the winner of third place 
guaranteed $50 and a trophy. Several other tro- 
phies will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner, 
Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

July 17, 18, 19, 1917— St. Joseph, Mo.— The Interstate 
Association's Twelfth Western Trapshooting Tour- 
nament, under the auspices of the St. Joseph 
Gun Club; $1000 added money. Winner of first 
place in the Western Handicap guaranteed $100 
and a trophy; winner of second place guaranteed 
$75 and a trophy, and the winner of third place 
guaranteed $50 and a trophy. Several other tro- 
phies will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner, 
Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

August 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 1917— Chicago, Ills.— The 
Interstate Association's Eighteenth Grand Amer- 
ican Trapshooting Tournament, under the aus- 
pices of the South Shore Country Club Gun Club; 
$4,000 added money. Winner of first place in the 
Grand American Handicap guaranteed $500 and a 
trophy; winner of second place guaranteed $400 
and a trophy; winner of third place guaranteed 
$300 and a trophy; winner of fourth place guaran- 
teed $200 and a trophy, and the winner of fifth 
place guaranteed $100 and a trophy. Numerous 
othei- trophies will also be awarded. Elmer E. 
Shaner, Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

9B 

Gone Are Our Pigeons. — There is a mistaken idea 
that the government has offered a reward for a spec- 
imen of the now extinct passenger pigeon, and every 
once in a while some misguided individual claims 
the reward .although in no instance has the pigeon 
proved to be a passenger. For fear of discouraging 
research, however, let us state that the man who can 
deliver a real passenger pigeon could collect a hand- 
some sum for it. The last one, so far as is known, 
was killed near Detroit in 1908. The last living 
specimen died last year in the Cincinnati zoo. 

Think of it! There are men now living who re- 
nif^mber when they literally darkened the sky and 
when they killed them as they roosted in the trees. 
Alexander Wilson, the ornithologist, reports seeing 
a single flock in Michigan that he estimated to con- 
tain at least 2,230,272,000 pigeons! As late as 1880 
they were plentiful. 

Of course, the market hunters and dealers in game 
have an alibi (they always have), which is a story 
of millions of pigeons being killed in a storm at sea, 
but what is an alibi like this in face of the following: 
In 1869 three carloads of dead pigeons were shipped 
every day for forty da.vs from Hartford, Mich. — a to- 
tal of 12,000,000 birds. There were hundreds of 
Hartfords then where pigeons could be had in car 
lots at 12 cents a dozen! 

No one in tho.se days believed that the passenger 
pigeon would ever be decreased, much less exter- 
minated — they had no example like we have. As we 
will point out in this column from lime to time, other 
birds are going the way of the passenger pigeon — 
slower, but just as certain. Think it over. 

"Ain't it a grand, glorious feeling" to think that 
the almost brainless poUcat, who kills only what he 
can use, has more horse sense than some hunters? 

QG 

A. G. Wilkes, Piesident of Pacific Coast Field 
Trials Club, and Mrs. A. (i. Wilkes are expected 
home after a two weeks' trip in New York. 



ALL READY FOR BIG TRAP SEASON. 



Golden Gate Gun Club Meets and Decides on Mer- 
chandise Shoot; Many Registered Events. 



Get out the gun and start oiling up in preparation 
to cry "P-u-l-l!" The alluring sport of trapshooting 
will soon be on in its full glory again. It is true 
that clubs up and down the Coast have been continu- 
ing their events right on through the winter, but 
with the dawn of a new year it brings forth new 
schedules and new activities. 

Around the bay the Golden Gate Gun Club has 
taken the lead in having a meeting of its officers and 
directors and steps have been taken to bring in the 
season with a loud report on Washington's Birthday. 
A merchandise shoot has been scheduled and it is 
expected that a big gathering will be on hand at the 
Alameda grounds. The officers also decided to apply 
to the Interstate Association for a registered tourna- 
ment on Sunday, May 20th. The Coast boys will be 
allowed to have their registered events on Sundays 
thi.': season and it will act as an inducement for the 
various clubs to get in line and pile up an average 
and at the same time enjoy their favorite pastime 
mere. At the Golden Gate meeting. President T. D. 
Riley presided, with Clarence A. Haight, secretary. 

Other clubs are busy getting in their applications 
to the Interstate Association. The applications must 
be in at February 15 and the secretaries are advised 
not to let the date slip by. 

The selection of a place for the California-Nevada 
State tournament will be settled shortly. The asso- 
ciation directors will have a meeting and act on the 
applications made. Del Monte is going to make a 
concentrated effort to land the big event. Traps 
have been installed on the beautiful grounds and 
the local shooters who were down there last summer 
for a tournament report that conditions are ideal 
with pleasant surroundings. 

The Pacific Coast Handicap at San Jose in the last 
four days of May is attracting a deal of interest. The 
San Jose Club officers are working tooth and nail 
to attract a record number of entries. Certainly 
with so many recruits getting into the game and 
with San Jose so conveniently located there will be 
manv of the boys m-iking tracks for the Garden City. 

8B 

To Shoot For Ail-Around Title. — Ten years ago 
this month Leonard Tufts inaugurated the midwinter 
trapshooting tournament at the Pinehurst Country 
Club, Pinehurst, N. C, and paved the way for the 
greatest trapshooting tournament of the winter 
season. 

The first Pinehurst tournament wasn't a big one. 
No one expected it would be; but it has grown each 
year until now it attracts trapshooters from every 
State in the Union and Canada . There was at least 
one representative from every State and the Cana- 
dian provinces last year, some 130 shooters in all, 
and in the tournament which begins on January 15th, 
and concludes on the 20th, more than 200 trapshoot- 
ers will participate. 

The pinehurst tournament has earned an enviable 
name among trapshooters. Those who attend one 
tournament always return, and they bring others 
with them. During the past three years the tourna- 
ment grew faster than the management anticipated 
and last year the club house wasn't large enough to 
accommodate ihe gathering. This year it will be 
different. A new club house has been erected. It is 
of brown stone and solid logs, 30 by 80 feet, divided 
into three rooms, each with an open fireplace. The 
club house is situated on the edge of an oak grove 
about 100 yards from the former quartres. 

k total of 129,610 targets were thrown at Pine- 
hurst last January, and the daily attendance averaged 
more than 1000 persons. There will be twice as 
many targets thrown this time and there will be 
many more spectators because there will be more 
class to the events. As an added attraction, Frank 
S. Wright, the former New York State Champion, 
and Fred Plum, of Atlantic City, N. J., will shoot for 
the All-round Amateur Championship trophy. Wright 
hails from Buffalo, N. Y., Plum is the present cham- 
pion. He defeated E. L. Bartlett, of Baltimore, for 
the title at the Westy Hogans' shoot. Plum was orig- 
inally challenged by Henry Powers, of Atlantic City, 
but as Powers could not shoot at Pinehurst, Wright 
asked to be allowed to lake his place. This event 
will be shot on January 15lh. 

The events at Pinehurst will be identical with 
those of last year, the main events being the Prelim- 
inary and Mid-winter handicaps, $5000 in cash and 
trophies will be given in the various events. In the 
two handicap events the shooters will be divided into 
classes, based on the scores made in the first 500 
targets. There will be an equal number of shooters 
in each class. The trophies for the classes will be 
the Presidents, Governors, Secretary, and Captains. 
By this system, every shooter has a chance to win 
a trophy. Those who win in the Preliminary handi- 
cap are not eligible for trophies in the Mid-winter 
handicap. The usual number of trophies will be 
given for high averages at 600 targets and for the 
entire week's shooting. Four traps will be used. 
Pinehurst is awaiting the event. It will be a great 
week. 

The hunting season is rapidly drawing to a close. 
Then the boys will turn their attention to the traps. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



CSaturday, January 13, 1917 



• * 

I Sportsmen's Row ! 

Fred Engle's record of a 41>^-pound bass was not 
surpassed by any member of the San Francisco Bass 
Club, and Engle is shortly to be the recipient of the 
Ripley medal, annually given to the "high hook" of 
the club. "Raldy" Cummings was "second hook" 
with a catch of a 37>/^-pound fish. Engle is to be 
pre.sented with his medal at the yearly banquet of 
the club on the evening of February 8th. 

* * * 

With duck shooting closed to the hunters of Mult- 
nomah, Columbia, Clatsop and Tillamook counties, 
the boys are now awaiting April 1, when they can 
fish for trout over .six inches long. Just now they 
are catching salmon trout and other large species. 
But with the coming of April angling in the Clack- 
amas, Rogue, and in streams in Columbia, Tillamook 
and Clatsop counties will be excellent. 

* * * 

An Alaskan white owl, the wings of which meas- 
ured 5 feet from tip to tip, was killed the other day 
by Claire Hicker, age 16, near Tacoma auto speed- 
way. The bird was resting on a telegraph pole and 
the lad brought it to the earth with a swiftly thrown 
rock. The rock struck the bird in the back of the 
neck, breaking it, and Hicker was much .surprised 
with the result of his throw. Stveral Alaska owls 
have been seen in the vicinity of Tacoma this winter. 

* * * 

A report from Livingston, Mont., is to the effect 
that hunting has been splendid near the Yellowstone 
Park this Fall. Grass has been plentiful the past 
season and the elk and other game are in fine flesh. 
The deep snow in the higher mountains has brought 
the elk down to the foothills and some fine specimens 
have been killed. Several herds of elk are soon to 
be rounded up and shipped to eastern parks, accord- 
ing to Deputy State Game Warden P. W. Nelson. 
State Game Warden J. L. DeHart was in Livingston 
recently arranging the details for the work. 

* * * 

It was announced by the officials of the Vernon 
Gun Club that a registered shooting tournament 
would be staged at the club on May 13, 14 and 15. 
The club is planning on making this shoot one of 
the biggest and best ever held in Southern California. 
The practice day for the shoot will be held on the 
12th. Six hundred dollars added money will be added 
to the three days' registered program. This means 
that $20 will be up for each twenty-bird event. 
^ ^ ^ 

H. Lorenson of Newman, one of the younger shoot- 
ers who was the sensation last season, is oiling up 
his 12-gauge to be on hand for the opening festivi- 
ties. 

* * * 

Manager Pete Ashcroft is figuring on putting the 
Alameda grounds into shape shortly. 

QC 

Griffon Popular Dog. — During the past five or six 
years a dog made his appearance in this country 
known to American canine animal lovers as the wire- 
haired pointing Griffon. He is a native of France 
and Belgium and is built very much on the order of 
the old Spanish pointer, with the exception that he 
has a wire-haired coat that is practically impervious 
to any weather conditions or any kind of cover. 

Among a certain class of sportsmen he soon be- 
came popular, for he is an all-round dog with an ex- 
cellent disposition and a shoke-bore nose. As a re- 
triever from land and water he has few equals, and 
on upland game he is equally at home. To the aver- 
age man the Grifton might look like an ordinary dog 
wi*h his great head, his almost yellow eyes, his 
shaggy coat and his stump tail, for fashion decrees 
that the Griffon must have his tail docked, but 'to 
the man who wants a faithful companion in the field 
and does not care particularly for range, speed or 
style, he proves up to the requirements. He can find 
birds if there are any in a given field, and while he 
may be slow in doing so, it is almost a certainty that 
none will l.e passed over. 

To foster the breeding of this new dog — new to 
American sportsmen, at least — a club has been 
formed and the president of it is L. A. Thebaud, the 
man who is primarily responsible for introducing the 
breed to American sportsmen. The secretary is Dr. 
E. B. Ilyus of Lancaster, Pa., who, like Mr. Thebaud, 
also imported a number of Griffons from Belgium 
and France. For a specialty club this new organi- 
zation has a very respectable following in the way 
of numbers and as for the quality of sportsmanship 
among the organizers, it is of the highest. 

Salmon Club of Oregon — "Two years ago a number 
of ardent salmon anglers got together and formed an 
organization which became known as the Salmon 
Club ot Oregon," said Walter F. Backus, secretary 
of the Multnomah Anglers' club. "The members of 
thiu club pledged themselves to use light tackle in 
fishing for Chinook salmon at Oregon City. Previous 
to this time most of the fishermen had been using 
very heavy gear, and the charter members of this 
club felt that th">y were losing a great deal of sport 
by not using lighter tackle. At first most of the 
salmon fishermen hooted at the idea, but the club 
went through its first season and ended up by hav- 



ing over 40 members. At the present time Secretary 
Ray Winters reports that he has almost 200 members 
on the list, and from all indications the membership 
wil Ibe doubled before the 1917 season is finished. 

"Most of the members of the Salmon Club feel that 
this year will see the end of net fishing in the Wil- 
lamette river, and a biulding committee has been ap- 
pointed, which has practically completed plans for a 
club house to be located at Oregon City. This club 
house is to be modeled after the one owned by the 
Tuna club in Southern California, which is well 
known to all big fish anglers. The building will 
probably be a two-story affair, the upper floor to 
consist of a general clubroom, with large windows 
overlooking the trolling ground. 

"Photos of fishing scenes will adorn the walls, and 
a record book will be in readiness to register all cap- 
tures made on light tackle. The lower floor will be 
given over to lockers, each member having sufficient 
space to hold the one piece rods which are so much 
in favor, as well as enough water-proof clothing for 
the rainy days. There will also be plenty of folding 
cots for the anglers who like to get out early in the 
morning. 

"Directly below the club house a large float will 
be anchored, with a fleet of perhaps 50 fishing boats 
— small, easy running skiffs for the trolling, and 
heavier models for the man who likes the rough 
water below the falls. An expert boatman will be 
in attendance during the trolling season, and there 
will be plenty of caddies to do the rowing for those 
who are not used to handling the oars. 

"Something of this sort has long been desired by 
all the lovers of salmon angling, but as the season in 
the past bar, seldom run longer than 20 days, a move 
such as outlined above would hardly have been justi- 
fied . With the nets removed from the Willamette 
river, there will be nearly two months of angling 
each spring, and as soon as the new law is in effect 
the Salmon Club will take up the proposed plan in 
earnest." 

SB 

Du Pont Long Run Trophy Plan. — The Long Run 
Trophy Plan of E. I. duPont de Nemours & Company 
has proved so popular during the past two years that 
Mr. T. E. Doremus, Manager Sporting Powder Divis- 
ion of tha tcompany, advises it will be continued 
during 1917 with but few changes . It is announced 
that during the two years of its operation the follow- 
ing trophies were won with DuPont Powders: 

Long Run Fobs, 1686; Long Run Bars, 4947; Long 
Run Watches, 116. 

It is also of interest to know that 77 shooters each 
won 1 watch, 7 shooters each won 2 watches, 7 each 
won 3 watches, and one shooter won four watches. 
Eighty watches were won by amateur shooters, and 
thirty-six by professionals. Following is a list of 
winners of DuPont Long Run Trophy Watches: 

*A .H. Amann, Pectone, Ills.; Dr. W. A. Anderson, 
Sleepy Eye, Minn.; *Neaf Apgar, Plainfield, N. J.; 
P. Baggerman, St. Louis, Mo.; E. L. Bartlett, Balti- 
more, Md.; W. S. Behm, Esterly, Pa.; J. W. Bell, St. 
Louis, Mo.; *F. G. Bills, Chicago, Ills.; John S. Boa, 
Montreal, Can.; Horace R. Bonser, Cincinnati, O.; 
R. H. Bruns, Brookville, Ind.; A. C. Buckles, Lake 
Fork, Ills.; Paul R. Burger, Catawissa, Pa.; J. Ed. 
Cain, Dayton, O.; J. I. Chipley, Greenwood, S. C. ; 
C. D. Cobum, Mechanicsburg, O.; A. V. Cooke, Wel- 
lington, Tex.; W. E. Corfield, Utica, N. Y.; *J. E. 
Dickey, Minneapolis, Minn.; *J. H. Donnelly. Guth- 
rie, Okla.; C. B. Eaton, Fayette, Mo.; Geo. N. Fish, 
Lyndonville, N. Y.; A. G. Flickinger, Vallejo, Cal.; 
*G H. Ford, Indianapolis, Ind.; O. N. Ford, San Jose, 
Cal.; Sam S. Foster, Mason City, la.; J. S. Fink, 
Worthington, Minn. (2) ; O. C. Funderburk, Detroit, 
Mich.: Ira Galbraith, West Frankfort, Ills; *L. S. 
German, Aberdeen, Md. (3) ; *Fred Gilbert, Spirit 
Lake, In. (3) ; *Mr. J. Mowell Hawkins, Baltimore, 
Md. (3); Allen L. Heil, Allentown, Pa.; Ed. Hellyer 
Jr., Alexandria, Pa.; Woolfolk Henderson, Lexington, 
Ky. (3): H. C. Hirschy, Minneapolis, Minn.; D. J. 
Holland, Springfield, Mo.; 6P. J. Holohan, Portland, 
Ore ; W. S. Hoon, Jewel, Iowa; M. S. Hootman, 
Hicksville .Ohio; * Walter Huff, Macon, Ga.; Charles 
Hummel, LaPorte City, la. (2) ; S. A. Huntley, Chi- 
cago, 111.; K. P. Johnson, Kenton, Ohio; Joe Kautzky 
Sr., Ft. Dodge, la.; * Arthur Killam, St. Louis, Mo. 
(4); A. C. King, Toms River, N. J.; R. A. King, Delta, 
Colo.; Max Kneussl, Ottawa, Ills; F. C. Koch, Phil- 
lipsburg. O.; A. Koyen, Fremont, Neb.; *C. O. Le- 
Compte, Asheville, N .C; *Barton Lewis, Auburn, 
Ills.; F. B. Lofland. Plymouth, Ohio; F. W. McNeir, 
Houston, Tex.; *T. A. Marshall, Evanston, 111.; J. G. 
Martin, Harrisburg, Pa. (2); *Geo. Maxwell, Hast- 
ings, Neb.; Frank H. Melius, Los Angeles, Cal.; 
Chas. H .Newcomb, Philadelphia, Pa. (3); John H. 
Noel, Nashville, Tenn; C. H. Peck, Remington, Ind.; 
H. J. Pendergast, Phoenix, N. Y.; H. Pfirrmann Jr., 
Los Angeles, Cal.: Fred Plum, Atlantic City, N. J. 
(2); R. E. Probert, Claypool, Ind.; A. B. Richard- 
son, Dover. Del (3); *F. C. Riehl, Tacoma, Wash.; 
W. D. Runnels, Staunton, Va. ; H. B. Shoop, Harris- 
burg, Pa.; G. R. Shuck, Kempton, Ind.; F. S. Side- 
botham, Frankford, Phila., Pa.; H. E. Smith, Colum- 
bus, Ohio; *C. G. Spencer, St. louis Mo. (2); R. L. 
Spotts, New Y'ork, N. Y.; *W .D. Stannard, Chicago, 
Ills.; J. R. Tansil, Blytheville, Ark.; *J. R. Taylor, 
Newark, Ohio (2); Brian Teats, Northumberland, 
Pa.; W. H. Tolen, Ft. Dodge, la.; F. S. Tomlin, Glass- 
boro, N. J.; F. M. Troeh, Vancouver, Wash. (3); S. 
G. Vance, Tillonsburg, Ont.; J. P. White, Watertown, 
S. Dak.; F. S. Wright, Buffalo, N. Y. (3); *C. A. 
Young, Springfield, O. ((*Denotes professionals.) 



TRICKS IN SHOOTING ON STAGE. 



Marvelous Feats Are Easily Explained When You 
Know the Facts. 



Most of our readers have seen what appear to be 
marvelous shooting feats on the stage, and have mar- 
veled greatly thereat. Some years ago Capt. Fowler, 
who was a clever stage marksman, as well as a 
really excellent shot, explained .some of the tricks 
to us, and exposed the deception. In Field and 
Stream we note that some of these dodges are de- 
scribed, and, as some of our readers might like to 
astonish their friends with their skill with rifle or 
revolver, we give a few instances. Say you desire 
to show off at targets apparently 1-in. in diameter. 
You require a black background and a few air- 
balloons. These are painted black and inflated to 
about 6-in. diameter. They are affixed to the back- 
ground, and small white spots 1 inch in diameter are 
painted on them. From a short distance the outlines 
of the balloons are invisible, and you have a target 
of some 30 inches at which to fire. A repeating rifle 
is used, and it is an easy matter to make 10 targets 
in as many seconds. A shot anywhere within a con- 
siderable radius would be practically certain to hit 
one of the balloons, and with its instantaneous col- 
lapse the white target would vanish. Where lighted 
candles are extinguished with a rifle, candles are 
placed in compartments or open boxes on a back- 
ground. The whole is painted black, the mask the 
partitions in the boxes, at the back of each box is 
placed a loosely hung plate of steel, suspended only 
by the top and free to swing slightly. Before this 
are placed the lighted candles, and the shooting 
begins. It should be remarked that these plates are 
six inches square ,and consequently give an area of 
large size to shoot at When a bullet strikes a plate, 
the concussion of the air caused by the quick move- 
ment of the plate in response to the impact of the 
bullet blows out the candle, and the trick is accom- 
plished. 

In the feat of disrobing an assistant with rifle bul- 
lets, the garments are made in halves, front and 
back, fastened together with thin glass globes, about 
two and one-half inches in diameter and of dark 
material, and the usual white spots painted on them, 
while the assistant invariably stands against a black 
background . If you can shoot reasonably straight it 
is not at all difficult. The marvelous revolver shoot- 
ing at moving targets is generally done with cart- 
ridges filled with bird shot. The man or woman who 
goes up into the top gallery and snuffs out the light- 
ed candles or breaks a small balloon sometimes does 
it the same way as described above, although many 
use p. steel funnel with a 12-inch opening which nar- 
rows down to about one inch where the object is 
placed. Th's opening, on account of the black back- 
ground, does not show to the audience, and all the 
marksman has to do is to shoot into the opening, 
and the bullet will finally reach the small end. A 
few years ago a Frenchman came over and created 
quite a sensation while playing in theatres through- 
out the country. He made about half a dozen straight 
shots; the rest were clearly fakes, and he had no 
trouble in fooling the general public. But one night, 
while he was playing the piano, supposedly by using 
bullets to strike the keys, his rifle jammed and the 
piano kept on playing for a few seconds, but quite 
long enough to make the audience sit up and take 
notice. 

aB 

Migratory Law Still in Force — Washington, D. C. — 
The Department of Agriculture has received inqui- 
ries from sportsmen in various parts of the United 
States as to the effect of the ratification of the treaty 
between the United States and Great Britain in ref- 
erence to migratory birds upon the Migratory Bird 
Act of 1913 and the Regulations issued thereunder. 
In response the Department has made the following 
public announcement: In the opinion of the Depart- 
ment, the Migratory Bird Act and Regulations are 
still in force; also these will continue in operation, 
and the Department regards it as its duty to enforce 
them, pending the enactment by Congress of new leg- 
islation for the purpose of carrying out the provis- 
ions of the treaty. 

Guard Against Fires. — Sportsmen in Texas are be- 
ing asked to guard against forest fires by the De- 
partment of Forestry, in a folder issued to the peo- 
ple of the State. The folder is also addressed spe- 
cifically to farmers, ranchmen, lumbermen, owners 
of cut-over lands, railroad men, boys and girls and 
citizens in sjeneral. Mr. J. H. Foster, State Forester, 
epitomizes the situation in these words: 

"Mr. Hunter: —Burning destroys the breeding plac- 
es of game, drives the birds fro mtheir nests and 
destroys the eggs and the young of countless thou- 
sands. Every fire that burns helps to rob hunting of 
its pleasure. 

"Mr. Fisherman: — Fires destroy young growth and 
humus which tend to prevent drying up o fsprings 
and small streams during dry seasons, preserve the 
regularity of stream flow and secure clear, running 
water so essential to the best fishing." 

The Alameda Elks Club will get busy and map 
out plans for the season. The members were new to 
the game last season but were very enthusiastic and 
active. 



Saturday, January 13, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1 



ARE STRIPED BASS BEING EXTERMINATED? 



SAN FRANCISCO FLY CASTING CLUB. 



Anglers Meet and Argue Question; Decide On Law 
For a Closed Season. 



When fishermen get together you can bank on 
there being many stories unfolded. Anyone holding 
opinions to the contrary should have been in attend- 
ance at the San Francisco office of the Fish and 
Game Commission when some seventy-flve sports- 
men, anglers and commercial fishermen answered 
the call to consider a bill proposed by Al G. Cum- 
mings. 

The important question of the extermination of 
the gamy and fine food fish, the striped bass, was up 
for debate. Cummings contended, and he was borne 
out by members of the San Francisco Bass Club and 
Pacific Bass Club, that the striped bass is rapidly 
passing out of exi.^tence. The fish, according to 
Cummings, has been afforded practically no protec- 
tion whatsoever, and naturally is suffering from the 
large catches that have been made season after sea- 
son. The commercial fishermen and some anglers, 
among them Al Wilson, set forth that the fish were 
never more plentiful in San Francisco Bay and the 
reason that the anglers are not making the strikes 
up in Wingo ,San Antone Slough and nearby points 
is that the fish have departed for other waters. 

E. L. Bosqur, the new fish and game commissioner, 
and Call Westerfleld ,the executive officer of the 
commission , presided and made efforts to give all 
parties a fair hearing. For about two hours the hear- 
ing held full sway with arguments and counter argu- 
ments. 

In the end a compromise was finally effected with 
both sides agreeing to support the bill to be intro- 
duced in the legislature by Cummings. It calls for 
a closed season to the net fishermen in the months 
of February, March and April, which with the period 
already shv.t out from September 25th to November 
15th, will afford plenty of protection. The anglers 
will submit to having the limit during the closed 
periods cut down from f^^e to two fish. 

The main argument was to keep the net fishermen 
from the mouths of the sloughs and creeks. Angler 
after angler made reports of seeing the present law 
violated and the object is to make it a felony for 
net fishing inside of a line drawn from Mare Island 
Light to S?n Pablo Point, and from the Fii'st Beacon 
in San Pablo Bay to Black Point, taking a line from 
a point on the Marin shore to a point northwest of 
Midshipman Slough. The net fishermen present 
agreed that it would be a good thing for the fishing 
game. 

ae 

Placing the limit of ? bass taken back to three 
pounds was another argument that met with the ap- 
proval of the assembled sportsmen. Commissioner 
Bosqur and secretary Westerfleld pointed out, how- 
ever, that the anglers at Sacramento were instru- 
mental in having the limit taken off and they would 
doubtless oppose any measure tending to put on the 
limit again. It was conceded that the Sacramento 
boys have only the opportunity of catching the 
smaller fish and some way will be tried to redistrict 
the state so that the limit can be put on around San 
Francisco Bay. 

While all these points were brought out, the stories 
just naturally popped out. When Al Cummings was 
questioned about how the fish are being extermin- 
ated, he made the bold statement that striped bass 
were so plentiful a matter of twenty years ago that 
a man could walk across San Francisco Bay on the 
backs of the fish. Furthermore, he declared that a 
man could not row his boat around Angel Island to 
the Racoon straits without having the fish jump 
inlo his boat. 

One of the commercial fishermen up and declared 
that striped bass are at present so numerous in the 
bay that he can go out any old day and catch 5,000 
pounds with his net. There were times when he 
could make it 50,000 pounds. This created a riot and 
pencil and pad wore brought out to figure that the 
market fisherman would need only a week or so of 
work in a season to make thousands of dollars with 
the fish selling at 12 cents a pound. 

The drastic arguments were finally stopped and 
all hand« got together and agreed that the proposed 
new law would work to great advantage in protect- 
ing the striped bass. 

ac 

Money for National Forests. — Washmgton, D. C. — 
Secretary Houston has announced the amount allot- 
ted to each State from the million dollars to be spent 
during the fiscal year 1918 in constructing roads and 
trails within or partly within the National Forests. 
This money is part of the ten million dollars appro- 
priated by the Federal Aid Road Act to assist devel- 
opment of the National Forests, which becomes 
available at the rate of a million dollars a year for 
ten years. 

The allotments as approved are as follows: Alaska 
$46 354, Arizona $58,604, Arkansas $9,803, California 
$140,988, Colorado $62,575, Idaho $108,730, Montana 
$70,042. Nevada $19,296, New Mexico $42,495, Oregon 
$128,111, South Dakota $8,092, Utah $41,167, Wash- 
ington $91,344, Wyoming $40,684. A total of $9,995 
has been allotted to Florida, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Nebraska, North Dakota, and Oklahoma. The group 
of Eastern States— Georgia, Maine, New Hampshire, 
North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and 
West Virginia — in which the government is purchas- 
ing lands for National Forests, receive $21,120. 



The medal contests of the San Francisco Fly-Casting Club this year were a pronounced success. 
W. D. Mansfield made a new record in heavy tackledistance fly with a 150-foot cast, and in delicacy and 
accuracy tly with a score of demerits. 

Following is a summary giving the general aver-age of our members in the different events for the 
season of 1916: 



We-<« 
Feet 

C. G. Young 

E. N. Borg 

Dr. E. W. Brooks 

J. F. Burgin 106.8 

F. J. Cooper 113.6 

Wm. Crawford 95.4 

W. J. Davis, Jr 108.6 

PJ. C. Edwards 103 

S. Forbes 118.6 

C. H. Gardner 96.6 

C. H. Kewell 110 

W. D. Mansfield 136 

F. H. Reed 

E. A. Rogers 119 

P. W. Shattuck 105 

A. Sperry 112.2 

H. B. Sperry 109.8 

J. Springer 

H. A. Thomsen, Jr 112.6 

F. A. Webster 110.6 



eg —4 

Feet 



103.6 
103.4 



107.4 
100.4 

93 
87" 



o 

>.£ 2 

O! u o 

De- 
merits 
19 
42.4 
19.6 

6.6 
12.8 
22 

9.8 
13.8 

8.8 
12.2 

7.8 
11.8 
11.2 

12.8 
26.8 
12.6 
18.8 
15.2 
10.2 



03 •O u 

" e 3 

3 K o 
dj u 
O < 
De- 
merits 
16.6 
47.8 
22.2 
27.7 
11.6 

19.1 
13.7 
16 
28.2 
24.6 
6.7 
6.7 
38.2 
27.4 
38.5 
31 
45.1 
23.6 



Q < 
De- 
merits 



CO t, 



Feet 



u 

. 2 

N t) 3 
O b U 

De- 
merits 
20.4 



r" 0) ^• 

2 a ^ ii 2 
(QO-a No>5 

s?j-3; ;f-'jQ jH< 
De- De- 
merits Feet merits 



20.6 










21.8 


23.2 










16.2 


19.2 


125.8 


20 


19.2 




8.6 


19 


103 


17 


9 


172.4 


10.4 






39 




103.8 




15.2 


130.6 


16.8 


21 


142.2 


io 


18 




61.8 






13.8 


13.6 


129.2 


13.4 


14.8 


145.4 


10.2 


22 




10.4 


17.6 




14.8 


13.8 


119.2 


20.8 


16.2 


163.4 


7.2 






21.4 


















19.2 


15.8 


138 ' 


18.4 


27.4 




12.8 






34 












38.8 








16.6 


114.4 


41.6 


37.2 




19.2 


14.8 


122 


44.2 






21 


19.4 




20.2 


17.2 




7.4 



P. W. SHATTUCK, Sec'y. 



In making allotments, it is explained, ten per cent 
of the amount available for 1918 is withheld as a con- 
tin'jent fund. One-half of the remainder has been 
apportioned among the States in amounts based on 
the area of the National Forest lands in each State, 
while the other half has been allotted on a basis 
of the estimated value of the timber and forage re- 
sources which the Forests contain. 

ae 

Los Angeles Club. — The Henry Pfirrmann Jr. silver 
trophy, contested for Sunday morning at the Los 
Angeles Gun Club, was won by Owen Council, with 
a score of 97 dead birds out of 100 shot at. Council 
shot from 18 yards. 

His nearest competitor was L. J. Micha, with a 
total of 96 dead out of the century from 19 yards. 
Micha, Harry Cline, Bill Kennedy and Louis Melius 
won take-home trophies for hanging up the best 
scores in each event of the 25 birds of the century 
contest. Yearly subscriptions to the Sportsmen's 
Review were won by P. G. Peterson, O. Evans, Seth 
Hart and W. A. Cornelius. The results: 

O. Council, 18 yds., broke 97; L. J. Micha 19—96, 
H. Cline 18—95, G. Holohan 21—94, L. R. Melius 
19—93, E. Mitchell 21—93, C. W. Fish 21—89, H. 
Pfirrmann 21—89, V. A. Rossbach 18—85, S. H. Hall 

17— 89, W. A. Cornelius 20—89, O. Evans 21—88, Wm. 
Kennedy 16—87, P. G. Peterson 17—87, C. H. Betz 
16—86, W. A. H'llis 21—85, W. A. Carnahan 16—85, 
Geo. Oliver 20—83, E. K. Mohler 21—82, P. O. Long 

18— 80, Mrs. H. Pfirrmann 16—79, H. Hickman 16— 
78, J. E. Betz 16—66, Mack Sennett 16—62, F. Free 
18_84, E. W. Selbach 16—84, O. D. Ashton 16—78, 
N. W. Nelson 16—77, Seth Hart 16—86, O. F. Mer- 
lich 16—83, P. Lettick 16—15, H. E. Sargent 18—86, 
C .F. Nichols 18—67x75, F. H. Nichols 18—58x75,, V. 
Powley 16—44x50, C. J. Hurst 16—41x50, M. D. 
Towne 16—40x50, J. W. "Griffith 16—40x50, G. C. 
Boynton 16—38x50, S. Steel 16—38x50, J. Carter 16— 
22x25, A. M. Van Ness 16—22x25, B. Lloyd 16—20x25, 
F. H. Teeple 20—19x25, H. Chamberlain 16—15x25, 
C. E. McStay 18—13x25, W. Jones 16—2x25, A. Baum- 
gartner 16 — 14x25, Mrs. Wm. Kennedy 6x15. 

ac ■ 

Vernon Club. — A ninety-nine per cent perfect day 
made shooting conditions ideal at the Vernon Gun 
Club Sunday, when 21 shooters turned out to com- 
pete in a 50-bird handicap event for the Gold Bar 
Trophy. DeHate won the emblem with a score of 
48x50. It was the winner's first appearance at the 
gun club in over a year. He shot from 16 yards. 
Stanton A. Bruner was runner-up with a score of 
47x50 from 20 yards. 

The results follow: 

Hdcp. Trophy Prac. 

J. W. Meed 18 46 44 

A. N. Vannest 16 39 

A. W. Bruner 16 47 21 

Dr. Leisure 16 30 

Wm. Pugh 18 43 41 

Stafford 16 44 

S. A. Bruner 20 47 49 

Bob Bole 17 45 45 

Chas. White 17 45 46 

Geoffest 16 . . 35 

Dr. Cooper 16 38 

Reid 16 41 42 

Dr. Goen 16 . . 32 

Dr. Edmonson 16 . . 38 

C. E. Groat 18 46 45 

DeHate 16 48 

Mrs. c;. E. Groat 18 46 23 

Ed. Bohring 18 46 

Wm. Browner 18 46 

J. D. Dierdoft 18 46 



Forest Rangers' Convention — San Francisco, Cal. — 
The Forest Ranger meeting, in session from January 
3 to 12 at College Hall, Berkeley, California, is the 
first ever attended by Rangers from all the eighteen 
National Forests in this State, according to District 
Forester DuBois. More than Seventy Forest officers, 
coming all the way from Alturas to San Diego, are 
making a study of administrative matters and the 
thousand and one questions pertaining to the busi- 
ness of the National Forests in California. In order 
that they may have every opportunity for informal 
as well as formal discussion, they are occupying the 
same quarters — College Hall, one of the largest dor- 
mitories in connection with the University of Cali- 
fornia. 

The mornings are given up to discussions and 
papers, and the afternoons to inspection trips about 
the Bay for the purpose of obtaining object lessons 
of the matters discussed in the morning sessions. 
Visits will be made to a local automobile factory, 
the Presidio, an Alameda ship-building plant, a San 
Francisco telephone exchange, a newspaper office, 
and the University of California. 

In the evenings the men gather about the fireplace 
for informftl talks by prominent educators, business, 
and professional men. Among the speakers who have 
been asked to make addresses are Dean Hunt, of 
the University of California, Professor Crocheron, 
Chief Farm Advisor for the State, Dr. Ebright, Pres- 
ident State Board of Health, William E. Colby, Sec- 
retary of the Sierra Club, A. B. Fletcher of the State 
Highway Commission, Capt. Parks and Capt. Poillen, 
U. S. A., E. H. Cox, President of the Weed Lumber 
Company, and R. L. Duffus, of the San Francisco 
Bulletin. 

The keynote of the convention is public service, 
and the chief subjects under discussion are, first, the 
ways and means by which the Forest Service may 
co-operate with rural communities and organizations 
in the development of local resources and industries, 
and the ways and means by which the Forest Service 
may co-operate in the improvement of living condi- 
tions, particularly as regards rural sanitation and 
recreation. Second, the meetings are devoted to dis- 
cussions of National Forest administration, protec- 
tion, and development, with reference to the applica- 
tion of modern efficiency methods. 

ae 

Seattle Association. — After an absence from the 
grounds for three weeks a small bunch of shooters 
turned out for the regular program shoot held on 
Jan. 7th. C. E. McKelvey showed up in great form, 
especially so in the fifty bird event, he going straight 
in the same and standing high score both in this 
and the hundred target race. Hi Follerich stood next 
to McKelvey through the program with scores of 
forty-eight and ninety-five. J. A. Fortier showed up 
at the traps for the first time and made a remarkable 
showing for his inexperience. 

Considerable interest has been created among 
irapshooting circles of this locality by the announce- 
ment of a Northwest Trapshooting Association, tak- 
ing in organized gun clubs of the northwest. Regis- 
tered shoots will be held in the various cities as 
worked out in the schedule now being made, it being 
planned to hold an event in each city represented 
every two weeks. The scores, at 50 targets: 

C. E. McKelvey 50, Hi Follerich 48, Ralph Kinzer 
45, Ed. Jones 44, W. B .Taft 42, C. W. Bandy 41, J. A. 
Hopkins 40, J. A. Fortier 22. 

At 100 targets— C. E. McKelvey 97, HI Follerich 
95 Ralph Kinzer 89, Ed. Jones 89, C. W. Bandy 88, 
J. A. Hopkins 86, W. B. Taft 78, J. A. Fortier 50, Dr. 
Hill 41. Yours truly, 

E. A. FRY. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1917 



MgllSllBS!9§!g®B)8HHBISlHffllSB'!SliBlB^ 

I Stock Breeders' Page 1 

gsiigiig'gjaiM?awi>a«Bgw 

More than 20,000 dairy cows are now being tested 
in California, an increase of approximately 15,000 in 
two years. 

<S> <S> 

The high price of mutton and wool has made the 
breeders of pure bred sheep very enthusiastic and 
many California breeders reports big sales of pure 
bred breedmg bucks and ewes. 

^ <^ <$> 

One of the best Shorthorn herds in California is 
owned by the Butte City Ranch, at Butte City, Cali- 
fornia. The herd bull is by a son of Whitehall 
Sultan. 

<8> <J> <i> 

Western breeders of pure bred beef cattle are pre- 
paring their herd headers for the National Western 
Live Stock Show, which will be conducted at Denver, 
January 22 to 27. Fred P. Johnson is the secretary 
of the show. 

<S> 4> 

.\ convention of the California Swine Breeders' 
Association will be conducted in Los Angeles, Jan- 
uary 18 and 19. Prominent breeders will discuss 
breeding, feeding and marketing, as well as every 
other part of the swine business. 

<S> <J> ^ 

Winnie Komdyke Cornucopia de Kol, owned by 
the J. S. Gibson Company of Williams, California, 
has just completed a yearly record of 31034.2 milk 
and 1200.99 butter. This gives her second place in 
milk production; and she is the only cow to give 
over 31.000 pounds of milk and produce 1200 pounds 
of butter. 

<8> <?> <$> 

H. E. Boudier, of Napa, recently sold Duroc boars 
to Albert Joppas, of Ferndale; Hiram Briggs, of 
Healdsburg; D. W. Rodgers of Gazelle, and sows to 
A. Munk, of Napa, and I. W. Brown, of Placerville. 
Mr. Boudier's Durocs have been successful in swine 
shows and his breeding stock is proving equally as 
successful in the breeding pens. 

The J. O. D. Ranch Co., at Aroya, Colo., recently 
received two carloads of fine Missouri Herefords 
which will be prepared for the National Western 
Stock Show at Denver. At the 1916 show this ranch 
won several championships on both its Hereford 
cattle and Duroc-Jersey swine. 

>$> <S> <8> 

Guy Miller, of Modesto, Cal., is one of the Jersey 
breeders of this State that is meeting with wonderful 
success. Mr. Miller has a number of Register of 
Merit cows in his herd and has several heifers on 
test now that he e.xpects to make the Register with- 
out any difficulty. 

❖ ♦ 

The development plans of the Stanislaus Dairy 
Farms Company on the old Gray Bros.' ranch, be- 
tween Oakdale and Knights Ferry, are well under 
way, and the first shipment of registered stock for 
the proposed big dairy will arrive from New York 
some time in February. 

❖ ❖ 

J. C. Bruss of Tulare has received twelve head of 
Tamworth hogs from Palmer, Illinois, and plans to 
raise this breed of hogs on a ranch near Tulare. 
These hogs are from registered stock and premium 
winning sires . English bacon is made from this kind 
of hog. 

❖ ❖ ^ 

Farmers' week in Missouri is one of the really 
important events in that State and attracts the farm- 
ers of the state in greater numbers than the fair 
and other agricultural meetings. The annual meet- 
;ng was conducted at Columbia, Mo., last week, and 
the attendance was the best in the history of the 
show. Prominent speakers of the United States and 
foreign countries were secured for the entertainment 
of the farmers. 

« <S> ♦ 

R. L. Hill, proprietor of Adenhill Farms, Columbia, 
Mo., has been made field representative of the Na- 
tional Duroc-Jersey Breeders' Association. Mr. Hill 
is one of the most successful breeders in Missouri, 
having developed several State fair winners and a 
champion at the National Swine Show. The brilliant 
success he has attained with his own herd, it is said, 
had much to do with his appointment. The Duroc 
association is one of the livest in this country and 
is making rapid progress for the breed. 

o 

Dixon Men Buy Big Sheep Range. 

A. J. Hillhouse, Roy D. Mayes and B. M. La Fon- 
taine, three capitalists and prominent business men 
of Dixon, Solano county, Cal., have obtained control 
of 150,000 acres of land in Lassen county on which 
they intend to engage in sheep raising on a large 
scale. They bought 9,000 sheep with the land. The 
purchase price has not been given out, but it is 
understood to be well up in six figures. 

The purchasers will take possession of the great 
range within thirty days. They have been working 
on the transaction for several weeks. All three will 
move to Lassen county as soon as they can put their 
business affairs in such shape as will permit of their 
attention to their new business. 



First National Calf Club Sale. 

Mr. Thos. F. Chamberlain, cashier of the First Na- 
tional Bank. Brighton, 111., purchased in Wisconsin 
last March 84 head of heifers ranging in age from six 
to sixteen months. These calves were shipped to 
Brighton and soid to school children in that vicinity 
at actual cost, the bank taking the child's note bear- 
ing six per cent interest. They paid an average price 
of $43 per head for these calves, delivered at Brigh- 
ton, with the understanding that in less than one 
year they were to be brought to Brighton and sold 
at public auction. The difference in what they paid, 
plus six per cent interest, and what the heifer 
brought at the sale, was the profit the child made on 
the transaction. 

This sale was held Friday, December 8, and the 
84 heifers were sold for cash at public auction to 
the highest bidder, and brought an average of $92.30 
per head, a total of $7,749. The notes given by the 
children totaled $3,612, leaving a profit of $4,137. 
This sale was the first of its kind held in this coun- 
try, and afforded convincing evidence of the practic- 
ability of the Bank Calf Club Movement in Illinois. 
Under the leadership of W. Scott Matthews, Illinois 
Dairy and Food Commissioner, this movement has 
resulted in the organization of nine Calf Clubs for 
the purpose of interesting children in the Dairy In- 
dustry. Plans are now under way for the formation 
of more of these clubs by bankers in different parts 
of the state. As the heifers had been on pasture 
the greater part of the time, the cost of keeping 
them was small. 

The program for "Sale Day" was given under the 
auspices of the Business Men's Dairy Extension 
Movement of Illinois, Dairy and Food Commissioner 
W. Scott Matthews, the Agricultural Committee of 
the Illinois Bankers' Association, and the First Na- 
tional Bank of Brighton, Illinois. First on the pro- 
gram was a parade, followed by speeches from prom- 
inent dairy authorities, and the awarding of prizes 
for heifers making the best showing. Moving pic- 
tures were taken, and a dairy banquet, served in 
Dutch style, closed the festivities. 

As a further means of encouraging dairy farming 
in this locality, S. P. Stevens, owner of the Oak 
Glenn Farm at Bartlett, Illinois, sent his show herd, 
including a $20,000 bull, and also put up 13 registered 
bulls with the understanding that they would be sold 
for what they would bring, to be kept and used for 
the improvement of the herds in this part of the 
state. These bulls were young stock, some of them 
being only six weeks old, and brought from $80 to 
$315 per head. 

Carl Vrooman, Assistant Secretary of Agriculture, 
made a special trip from Washington, D. C, in order 
to address the boys and girls of the Brighton Club, 
to encourage them in their dairy work and congratu- 
late them on the results accomplished. 

Prof. F. W. Merrill, of the Dairy Development 
Department of the DeLaval Separator Company, ex- 
plained briefly the points in selecting good dairy 
stock. 

Ruth Deatherage's heifer brought her $145 — and 
the pound of butter which Ruth made herself from 
her heifer's milk was sold at auction and was bought 
by the International Harvester Company for $5.00. 

It was very interesting to watch this sale and see 
the interest manifested by the children who had 
cared for these heifers, but the part of the program 
that attracted most attention was to see these chil- 
dren gather at the bank and receive their money, 
and see them deposit the same, and in hearing what 
they had to say about what they were going to do 
with this money. And in nearly every instance it 
was this: "I am going to buy two heifers this spring 
and I am not going to sell them. I am going to keep 
them and start a dairy herd." 

We believe that practical work of this kind will 
go much farther in encouraging children to stay on 
the farm than all the -literature that could be dis- 
tributed and speeches that could be made. Speeches 
and bulletins are good, but practical help and actually 
earning money on the farm are the best arguments 
to use. In other words, help people to help them- 
selves. You can go to any town, especially in South- 
ern Illinois, and find men working at very low wages, 
barely able to support their families. If they had 
been encouraged when they were children and re- 
ceived this practical help, they would not be living 
on the farms where they were born and would be 
prosperous dairymen and farmers, and their land 
would be worth from $100 to $200 an acre, whereas, 
in many instances now, the land they were living on 
30 years ago has been practically abandoned and 
some of these farms have grown up in blackberry 
briars and sassafras bushes. If this practice of en- 
couraging the children was universally adopted by 
the bankers of Illinois it would result in the produc- 
tion of much more meat, butter, cheese, leather, and 
other products which come from the cow. Do you 
know there are six million less cows in this country 
today than there were fifteen years ago, and twenty 
thousand more people? About 75 per cent of the 
citizens of the United States lived on farms 30 years 
ago. Today approximately 50 per cent live on farms 
and about 50 per cent in the towns. 

o 

At a sale of 40 Percheron mares and stallion.'; held 
in Kansas December 14th at the White Water Falls 
Farms, the top price for a stallion was $1040 for the 
gray two-year-old Comet 125810, and the top price 
for a mare $800 for a two-year-old by Casino. No 
horse sold for less than $320. 



Want to Help Reduce Living Cost. 

Believing that one way to help reduce the cost of 
living is to reduce the cost of production on the 
farm, the University of California has invited the 
farmers of California and all others interested to 
attend a "Farmers' Week" to be held at the Univer- 
sity Farm at Davis on Tuesday and Wednesday, May 
29 and 30, and Thursday, June 1, 1917. This three 
days and a half will be devoted to intensive agricul- 
tural study and farm demonstrations. 

"Farmers' Week" will be so arranged that those 
attending may devote their whole time to a single 
subject or special field of farming work, or may turn 
their attention to several different problems. There 
will be four or five parallel courses — in such subjects 
as livestock, field crops, deciduous fruits, dairying, 
and poultry. Practical demonstrations of methods 
will be emphasized . Visitors will be given a chance 
actually to try for themselves the new methods rec- 
ommended and discussed in the conference. There 
will be no charge for enrollment in these courses. 

Breeders of Berkshire Hogs to Gather. 

An important gathering of breeders of swine will 
be held at the University of California Farm at Davis 
on February 13, 14 and 15, 1917, as the Western 
Berkshire Congress. Tuesday, February 13, there 
will be a judging of fine hogs, subsequently to be 
slaughtered in a carcass-judging competition, an in- 
spection of the activities of the University Farm, and 
a business meeting in the evening. Wednesday, 
February 14, there will be a students' judging con- 
test of sale stock and a show of breeding stock, a 
swine-judging contest in which only women may 
compete, a carcass demonstration, a banquet, and a 
"Berkshire Love Feast." On Thursday, February 15, 
there will be an exhibition of sale hogs, followed 
that afternoon by a public sale. 

A Tribute to the Cow. 

Little do we realize the debt we owe The Cow. 
During the dark ages of savagery and barbarism we 
find her early ancestors natives of the wild forests 
of the old world. As the bright rays of civilization 
penetrated the darkness of that early period, and 
man called upon The Cow, she came forth from her 
seclusion to share in the efforts that gave us a 
greater nation and more enlightened people! 

For two thousand years she has shown her alleg- 
iance to man, sharing alike in his prosperity and 
adversity, responding nobly to all that was done for 
her, until through her development she became an 
idol of the people of her native country. 

In 1493, when Columbus made his second voyage 
to America, The Cow came with him, and from that 
time to the present day she has been a most potent 
factor in making this, our country-, the greatest 
nation, w'th the highest type of womanhood and man- 
hood history has ever known! 

Her sons helped till the soil of our ancestors and 
slowly moved the products of the farm to market. 
They went with man into the dense forests of the 
new world, helped clear them for homes and made 
cultivation possible for the coming generation, and 
when the tide of emigration turned westward they 
hauled the belongings of the pioneer across the sun- 
scorched plains and over the great mountain ranges 
to new homes beyond. 

Truly, The Cow is man's greatest benefactor. 
Hail, wind, drouths and floods may come, destroy 
our crops and banish our hopes, but from what is 
left The Cow manufactures into the most nourishing 
and life-sustaining foods, and is she not foster mother 
and life itself to countless thousands of little children 
all over this world of ours? We love her for her 
docility, her beauty and her usefulness. Her loyalty 
has never weakened, and should misfortune overtake 
us as we become bowed down with the weight of 
years, we know that in The Cow we have a friend 
that was never known to falter. She pays the debt. 
She saves the home. God bless The Cow — little do 
v.'e realize the debt we owe her! — ^[E. G. Bennett. 

Miles City and Its Horse Mart. 

More horses now change hands at Miles City, 
Montana, from their original owners, than even at 
the great horse markets at Chicago and St. Louis. 
The Miles City Horse Sale Company was established 
15 years ago, when A. B. Clark conceived the idea 
of bringing the buyers and sellers of Montana horses 
together . 

The first sale was held in the Northern Pacific 
stockyards and a train load of horses could be bought 
for a song . It was a discouraging fight, but Mr. 
Clarke persevered and gradually the horse breeders 
of Montana became convinced that they could raise 
big boned horses with quality and substance, as well 
as the bucking bronco. Scores of richly bred draft 
stallions have been put on the range, and the horses 
sold at Miles City now show the effect of the Im- 
provement. 

New yards have been added in recent years, a 
large sale pavilion has been erected and today the 
sale yards cover over ten acres of ground. They 
have branches in Utah, Oregon and other western 
states . The present officers of the company are: 
Ed Love, president ; Luther Milligan, secretary, and 
Guy Crandall, manager. 

o 

Contact, M Percheron stallion that won fourth prize 
at the Chicago International, changed hands during 
the show for $7,000. The buyer was T. B. Bowman, 
of Boone, Neb. For a two-year-old colt of the same 
breed a Canadian horseman paid $5,000. 



Saturday, January 13, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE FARM 



PUTTING THE AUTO TO WORK. 



Most farmers believe that "hand- 
some is as handsome does,' 'so when 
they took to the automobile they 
speedily found other uses than joy 
riding for it.. Joy riding is mighty 
fine but it doesn't pay intere.'^t on the 
mortgage. Manufacturers have work- 
ed with the farmer to make the auto 
profitable as well as plea§uable. The 
modern auto will stand country roads 
and climb country hills, carrying eggs, 
butter and like things, to market, and 
bringing many needed articles back, 
that otherwise would mean a slov.' 
trip with the team — perhaps when 
the team was badly needed on the 
farm; or work at a standstill till some 
repair or other arrived. And perhaps 
when the auto gets back from its trip 
it pumps water, grinds feed and does 
like work. 

Anyhow, all these things are pos 
sible. There are trailers on the mar- 
ket to attach to the auto so that it 
can carry quite a load of light stuff. 
There are gears and shafting which 
transform the car into a power plant 
capable of running all sorts of light 
machinery. Regarding these. Profes- 
sor Wirt of the Kansas Agriculturil 
College says: 

"The purchase of a trailer makes 
possible the transporting of milk, 
cream, garden truck, and chickens to 
markfet. The trailers, which ars of 
various design, are manufactured by 
more than a dozen companies. Tlie 
engine of the average automobile is 
seldom worked to capacity and con- 
sequently there is plenty of tractive 
power to take care of the light trailer. 

"Attachments are now being manu- 
factured, at a low price, which will 
transform several of the more popular 
makes of cars into power plants. A 
series of gears and shafting has been 
devised which operates a pulley on the 



Warranted 

to Cive satisfaction. 




GOMBAILT'S 

fAlSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Curb, Splint, Sweeny, C.ipped H'^ck, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spavin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumors. Cures aU skin 
diseases or Parasites, Thrash, Diphtheria. 
Removes all Bunches from Horses or 
Cattle. 

As a HTM AN EEMEIJY for Kheti- 
matlara, NpriUuf, Soro Xhroat, et<., It 

1» inval uable. 

Every bottle of Canntlc Balaam sold Is 
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per bottle. Sold by dnigirl.sM, or sent by ex- 
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use. 8«nd for descriptive circulars, testimo- 
nials, etc. Aildress 

Til LiWREmS-WILlIilia COHPin.CltTeUnd, OliiA 



front of the car, and makes it possi- 
ble to turn farm machinery. 

"One of the smaller cars most pop- 
ular on the market will develop about 
12 horse power on the brake, and is 
consequently more tha nstrong enougli 
for the average work required of a 
farm engine. Most farmers use a gas 
engine of five or si.\ liorse power. 

"It is not economical to use a 12- 
horse power engine for furnishing 
power to a washing machine or a 
pump. It is best to have a system 
of shafting which can be arranged to 
drive several pieces of machinjry 
simultaneously. Corn shellers, feed 
grinders, fanning mills, and other 
small pieces of farm machinery can 
be connected with the system of 
shafting. 

"If there is a small electric power 
plant with storage batteries on the 
farm the automobile engine can be 
made effective in charging the bat- 
teries at times when the car is not in 
other use, but it would not be econom- 
ical to use the car's engine to store 
electrical energy in the battery, and 
then use the electricity to drive small 
individual motors attached to the 
smaller pieces of machinery, except- 
ing the washin.g machine, sewing ma- 
chine, and the like. The overhead 
charges are too heavy. 



USE OF MILKING MACHINES. 



In using a milking machine some 
facts of interest were brought out by 
an experiment at the North Dakota 
Station where seven machines of lead- 
ing makes were tested. 

Care must be taken that the ma- 
chine does not frighten the cow or 
make her nervous. A little nervous- 
ness at first is only natural with some 
animals, but they should be gently 
handled to rid them of any fear, or 
they will hold up their milk. 

The teat cups of the machine must 
fit to the cow's teats. In cold or wet 
weather when the teats are wrinkled 
o rshrunk this point needs especial at- 
tention. 

The pulsations of the machine must 
also be adapted to the cow to get the 
best results. A quick pulsation is not 
good for a hard milker with long 
teats, nor a slow pulsation for a cow 
with short teats that milks easily. 

The machine should not be attached 
too quickly to a cow that is slow in 
letting down her milk. Start the milk 
first. Most cows let down tl.eir milk 
more slowly as the milking period is 
advanced. For this reason it is better 
to begin the use of a machine when 
the cows are fresh. 

The machine is not adapted for use 
with cows whose front teats give much 
more milk than tlieir rear teats. The 
continued suction on the front teats 
after they are dry, while the rear 
ones are being finished, may injure the 
cow's udder. And the discomfort may 
cause the cow to hold up some of the 
milq in her rear teats. 

The conclusion of the experiments 
is that for successful u-se of the milk- 
ing machine, it must be a good one, 
the ccows must be normal with well 
developed udders, and the operator 
must thoroughly understand both the 
cows and the machine. 



Shingles Required For a Roof. — To 

find the number o fshingles for a roof, 
multiply its area in square feet by 
nine i fshingles are laid four inches 
to the weather, by eight, if four and 
a hal finches to the weather, by seven 
and one-fifth if five inches to the 



weather. For hip roofs add one- 
twentieth to result. Example: Sup- 
pose each side of the roof is 30 feet 
long and 16 feet wide, shingles to be 
laid four inches to the weather: 30x16 
equals 480 squaree feet in one side of 
the roof, or 960 square feet in both 
sides; 960x9 equals 8,640 shingles re- 
quired. If it is a hip roof one-tw<ui- 
ticth more will be required . One- 
twentieth of 8,640 is 432, added to 
8,640 equals 9,072 shingles required. 



Of 16,700 cows tested through 47 
Wisconsin cow testing associations 
last year, 3,375 were disposed of as 
unprofitable. 

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Gets (he Nest as Well as the Parent 

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ASK YOUR DEALER SEND Gc IN STAMPS FOR TRIAL CAN 

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OF CALIFORNIA 
Nos. 19 to 25 Minna St., San Francisco 



TELEPHONE KENNELS 

530 FULTON ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Markst 2074. 

Dogs and pups of all breeds for sale. 
Dogs boarded under sanitary condi- 
tions. Special care of bitches in whelp 
and puppies. Dogs clipped and baths 
carefully given. Positively no sick 
dogs accepted. 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

Proprietor. 



Win .F. EG AN. V.M.R.C.S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 
1155 Golden Gate Avenue 

Brancb H<)»pltal, coiner W«b»l«r ana 

Chestnut Streets. 

San Francisco, California 



FEEDING 



Wins Healt' , Wealth 
and Productivity. 
You can gain the best 
returns by learning 
the most modern and 
practical methods of 
using the main feeds 
and of turning your 
by-products into 
9oliupro6t. Professor 
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FARM ANIMALS 
has sifted and mado 
practical the results 
obtained from the ex- 
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productivity for the animals, money in the 
bank for you. 

362 pages. 96 Illustrations. Octavo. Hand- 
some cloth. $1.50 net. Postage or express 
charges extra. 

Al>I)KKSa 

Breeder and Sportsman 

Po«t Office Drawer 447, San Franclico 





HORSE 
EALTH 



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..Modern Horse Manapment.. 

CAPTAIN R. S. TIMMIS 

Nearly 500 photographs and drawings. 
144 Plates 11x8. Royal quarto, 316 
pages. Cassell & Co.: London, To- 
ronto, Melbourne, etc. Stokes & Co.: 
New York. $5 postpaid. 
"A most vnlunble authority." — Sporting 

and Dramatic News, Liondon. 
"Very sound and well thought out." — The 
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-EL DORADO- 



COCOANUT OIL MEAL 

FOfl HORSES, MILK COWS, CHICKENS, 
rOUNG PIGS AND HOGS 

If Your Dealer Doesn't Ciury It. .\<Mres9 

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ALL CUTS 
IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

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215 LEIDE8DORFF ST., 
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Phone Douglas 1810 



118 to 160 Clara St. 
San Francisco. Cal. 



G. LINDAUER 

General Livery and Sale Business 

COUNTRY HORSES FOR SALE 

WKUailNli 1200 hha. TO 1700 Lbs. 

Mules In Carload Lots 

Horiea and Rl(i ot All Oeacrlpllona for HIro at All Times 

BLAKE MOFFIT & TOWNE 
PAPER 



DEALERS 
IN 



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lassiiild Advertising 



THOROUCSHBRED STALLION FOR SAL* 

lirovvn. six yrar-^ okl. sircil by Orsiiii, dam 
Lcta Trix by lirutiis, sound. Brod by J. J. 
Mooru. Address J.VMKS LAYNE. 

21) S. Kiver Street. San Jose, Cal. 



FOR SALE— THR ICICLE by The Ice- 
man 2:10, dam Csilifornla by a son of 
Sable Wilkes, next dam IhorouBhbred. 
IIaiid.soiiio( dark bay hor.se with black 
mane and tail, star, and both hind p.'is- 
tern.s white. A remarkably .sliow.v horse, 
weish.s 1000 pound.s, .stands IS'Ji hands 
hljjh and can .show five gaits under .sad- 
dle. Has trotted a mile in 2:16%, last 
quarter in .'i2',.j seconds; trotted a halt in 
1:041,4. Kind disposition and IntcIliKont. 
One of the most desirable horses to ride, 
drive, or -show, In California. Will be 
sold cheap. Address 

A. T. JACKSON, 

U. 4, Box 11, Stockton, Cal. 



I WANT TO BUY. — I have sold eleven 
horses in the Inst few months ranging 
from $2,000 to $200. If you have a l)or.se 
for sale and will write me, I will tell you 
what my system Is. It la a wlimer. I llnd 
there Is a buyer for every horse for sal« 
at the right price. It Is Just a question ol 
getting the buyer and seller together. If 
you have one for sale let mo hear from 
you. MAGNUS FLAWS, 

542 S. Dearborn St., Chicago. III. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 13, 1917 



BEAUTIFUL BELVEDERE 



LOTS FOR SALE 



/ 




CORINTHIAN ISLAND Subdivision to Belvedere is the 
most beautiful spot on the shores of San Francisco Bay 
for a suburban home. It commands an extensive view of 
the City of San Francisco, Alcatraz and Angel Islands, 
Raccoon Straits, San Francisco Bay, Richardson's Bay, 
the Berkeley shore, beautiful Belvedere and Mt. Tamal- 
pais. It is in Marin County, directly opposite San Fran- 
cisco, and forms the eastern shore of Belvedere cove. 
It has a naturally terraced, sunny, western slope that is 
well adapted for many choice residence sites, every one 
affording most picturesque views of the bay and moun- 
tain. It is protected from the prevailing western trade winds in 
summer by Belvedere Island, and from the southerly storms in 
winter by Angel Island. The soil is fertile and part of the island 
is well wooded. 

It is less subject to fog than any other place near San 
Francisco. The summer fog, as it rolls in from the ocean, splits 
on the western slope of Sausalito, part of it flowing in a line with 
Angel Island towards the Berkeley shore, and part of it along 
the southern slope of Mt. Tamalpais, leaving Belvedere, Corin- 
thian Island and Raccoon Straits in the bright sunlight, while 
the fog banks can be seen as a white wall both to the north and 
the south. 

There is very little available land about the shores of San 
Francisco Bay that is desirable for homes, especially for those 
who love boating and kindred sports. The Alameda and Contra 
Costa shores of the bay are the lee shores and receive the full 
brunt of the boisterous trade winds which lash the shoal waters 
near the land into muddy waves, making boating both unpleas- 
ant and dangerous. To the north of the city and in Marin 
County the land from Sausalito to the entrance of the bay is a 
Government reservation and will never be placed on the market. 
The shores of Richardson's Bay are not at present convenient 
to boat service and, aside from Belvedere and Corinthian Island, 
there is little or no land near any ferry landing that possesses 
the natural advantages, improvements and possibilities that are 
offered on Corinthian Island. Concrete roads, pure water, tele- 
phone service and electric light wires are already installed. It is 
only ten minutes' walk from any point on the property to 
Tiburon boats, and but forty-three minutes' ride to the foot of 
Market Street. 

On the point of Corinthian Island the Corinthian Yacht 
Club has had its home for many years, and on any summer day 
the white sails of its numerous fleet add to the charming scene, 
as the trim yachts glide about the cove. Excellent fishing of all 
kinds for bay fish, including salmon, the gamey striped bass, 
rock fish and the toothsome silver smelt, is to be had in the cove. 
There is probably no spot so accessible and in such close prox- 
imity to any large city in the world that offers the attractions 
of climate, magnificent scenery, fishing and boating as will here 
be found. 



FOR MAPS, PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 



S. L. PLANT, 

PLANT RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO., 

32 BEALE STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 



6"B. 



F. W. KELLEY, 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN OFFICE, 

366 PACIFIC BUILDING 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Saturday. January 13, 1917] 



THE BREEDER A 



ND SPORTSMAN 



15 



Duck Popularity is Increasing. — It 

costs no more to feed and shelter lay- 
ing ducks than hens. The eggs are 
not only much larger but in greater 
number, and, in the opinion of many 
are better than hen eggs. Indian Run- 
ner ducks have made wonderful egg 
records. 

A swinimin gspace is not a neces- 
sity. Many prefer to dispense with 
it and report good results. Indian 
Runners are particularly adapted to 
this form of dry farming. As a rule, 
however, the highest fertility of eggs 
is on the ranch with the water. If 
pools are provided, they must be fre- 



quently cleaned. 

With the rapid vani.shing of grazinR 
land, it would seem that the price of 
beef is destined to continue rising. In 
my case there is a shifting of demand 
for meat. It is more fowl and less 
beef. This is due partly to price and 
particularly to the relative merits of 
the meats. He who enters the duck 
business can depend upon a growing 
market. — Homer Derr in Rural World. 

One advantage of always keeping 
the pigs thrifty and growing is that 
they are always ready for market and 
the owner is enabled to take advan- 
tage of high prices is offered. 



$10 Due on Two-Year-Olds 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1st, 1917 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stake No. 15."-$5,150 

GIVEN BY THE PACIFIC COAST TROTTING HORSE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

FOR FOALS OF MARES BRED IN 1914 
FOR FOALS OF 1915 TO TROT OR PACE AT TWO AND 
THREE YEARS OLD 
$2800 FOR TROTTING FOALS $250 TO OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

$1800 FOR PACING FOALS $300 TO NOMINATORS OF DAMS OF WINNERS 

MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 
$2100 for Three-Year-Old TroUert. 

100 to the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry Is named the 
Winner of the Three-Year-Old Trot. 
800 tor Two-Year-Old Trottert. 



50 to the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry It named 
the Winner of the Two-Year-Old 
Trot. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner 
of Three-Year-Old Trot when mare 
was bred. 



$1200 tor Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

100 10 the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry Is named the 
Winner ot the Three- Year-Old 
Pace. 

500 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
50 to the Nominator ot the Dam on 
whose Original Entry Is named the 
Winner ot the Two-Year-Old Pace. 
50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire ot Winner 
of Three- Year-Old Pace when mare 
was bred. 



$150 In Special Prizes was paid to Stallion Owners in December, 1914 
ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on December 1, 1914, when 
name, color, de.scription of mare and stallion bred to mu.st be given; $5 March 1, 
1915; $5 November 1. 1915; $10 on Yearlins.s, May 1, 1916; $10 on Two- Year-Oldi 
February 1, 1917; $10 on Three-Year ■Old.s February 1, 1918. 
STARTING PAYMENTS— $25 to .start in the Two-Year-Old Pace, $35 to start in the 
Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three- Year-Old Pace; $50 to start in 
the Three-Year-Old Trot. All startingr payments to be made ten days before 
the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 
Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered 
is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start as Two-Year-Oldt are not barred from starting again In the Three- 

Year-Old divisions. 

F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 
Post Office Drawer 447, San Francisco, Gal. 



HEALD, 

Presloent. 



Buy A McMurray! 





THE NEW McMURRAY 

CHAMPION SULKY 



The Real Lady (2) t. 2:04%, 
world's champion two-year-old, 
establl.shed two new world's rec- 
ords the first time hitched to the 
New McMurray Sulky. 

Every race record of two minutes 
or better In 1916 was made to 
the new McMurray Sulky. 

The Golden Anniversary Catalogue 
shows the complete line of Mc- 
Murray "E a s y Riding" Jog 
Carts in which horse action Is 
absorbed Into the springs — The 
Model 80 "Flyer," the last word 
in a training cart — The New 
Model 44 "Featherweight" Racer 
for racing, training or Matinee 
driving, and Is gladly mailed 
free. 

Remember, McMurrays build Sul- 
kies and Carts exclusively. Their 
mechanics are specially trained, 
and by devoting their entire time 
to one line, are better able to 
furnish a first quality article at 
lowest cost. 

Let McMurrays tell you what they 
can do for you. 

The McMurray Sulky Company 
288 N. Main St., Marlon. Ohio 



GOOSE SHOOTING!! 



-ON- 



CHURCH-HANSON 

Famous Goose Preserve 

Near Rio Vista 



THE BEST GOOSE CALLERS IN THE 
STATE 
and a large number of 
LIVE GEESE DECOYS ALWAYS 
On Hand, Assure 
THE SPORTSMAN A GOOD SHOOT. 

FOR PARTICUttRS and RESERVATION PHONE OR WRITE: 



W. Gordon Wagner 

PROPRIETOR 

HOTEL RIO VISTA 
RIo Vista — California 

Veterinary 
Dentistry 

Ira Barker Dalziel 

Every facility to Klve th« beat of pro- 
feialonal aervlces to all caaea of vaterlu- 
ary dentistry. Compllcatad caaea treated 
aucceaafully. Calla from out of town 
promptly reaponded to. 

The Best Work at Reasonable Prices 
IRA BARKERDALZIEL, 

530 Fulton Stroot, 
San Pranolaeo, Cal. 



To Be Sure You're Shooting a 




SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDER 

DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
OR SCHULTZE 

Should Be on Case, Carton 
and the Top Shot Wad 

There is prevalent among shooters some con- 
fusion concerning Du Pont brands of smokeless 
shotgun powders; DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
and SCHULTZE are the Smokeless Shotgun 
Powders manufactured by the DuPont Company 

Look at the Top Shot Wad 

—if it reads DUPONT, BALLISTITE or SCHULTZE 
you have the Du Pont Company's powder in your 
shot shells. 

Ask for DUPONT, BALLISTITE or SCHULTZE at 
your dealer's or club when buying loaded shells. 

For booklets giving loads for trap and game shooting, 
or any information about sporting powders, write to 

£. /. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 

WILMINGTON. DELAWARE 

BRANCHES: SAN FRANCISCO. SEATTLE and DENVER 



LIVESTOCK INSURANCE- 

is just as important as Fire Insurance, or automobile 
insurance or any other form of business protection. 
And, here is a company that provides that protection 
to stock owners with assurance of prompt payments 
when losses occur. 

Montana livestock & Casualty Insurance Co. 

DOUGLAS KEITH, General Agent Northern Califor- 
nia, 701 Royal Insurance BIdg., San Francisco. 

W. H. MILLER, General Agent Southern California, 
505 Lankershim BIdg., Los Angeles. 



BLOODSTOCK 

STALLIONS. 

MARES. 

RACERS. 



MANY ANIMALS BEST STRAINS 
FOR DISPOSAL. 



Detiils Supplied on Application 
Stating Full Requirements 

IRISH BLOODSTOCK AGENCY 

COYLE&GO. (BROKERS), LTD., 

7 Anglesea St. 
DUBLIN. IRELAND 

IIANKKRS: TELKCJKAKIC .VDDRKS.S: 

BANK OF IRELAND > INSURANCE, DUBUM " 

Agenta Required Throughout the World. 




Convenience- 
Train Schedules 
Fast Service 
Clean comfortable ridin; 
Observation car service 
Courteous employes 
Electrically heated cars 
Modern steel coaches. 

Between San Francisco 

.\Ni) roiNT.'^ IN Tin; 
SACRAMENTO VALLEY 
Ontht "Stn Franclsco-Sacrtmento Scenic Lint" 
■nd Northern Electric Ry. 

Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Ry. 

8AN KHANCISCO DKI'OT KKKRV liUILIJINO 
PHONK SUTTER 2339. 

HEALD'8 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

trains for business 
and places its graduates 
in position 

1215 VAN NESS AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



THE WISE SPORTSMAN'S NEW YEAR RESOLUTION! 

Use the © Brand Shells and Ca^rtridg'es 

\, Wherever ammunition is used the name of "Peters" is synonymous with QUALITY. The high standards used in the production of these goods guarantee 
that every lot of shells or cartridges shipped under our labels embodies all the essentials of perfect ammunition, such as accuracy, penetration, uniformity 
and general reliability. 

^ In the last analysis, successful performance is the most conclusive evidence of quality, and during the year 1916, the exceptional shooting proficiency of 
Peters shells has again been demonstrated. 



Mr. Rolla O. Heikes, a veteran of more than 25 years' experience In trapshooting. began using Peters shells a little over a year ago and his Official Average 

for 1916, 96. 24^;, exceeds by several per cent the best average he ever made with other makes of shells. 

Similarly Mr. W. R. Crosby, another man with country-wide fame among trapshooters and sportsmen of all classes, averaged In 1916 96.79%, using 
Peters shells exclusively and exceeding any yearly average he has ever made on a similar or greater number of targets when using other brands of ammu- 
nition. 

Add ;o this the achievement of Mr. Woolfolk Henderson in winning the Official High Amateur Average in 1914, 96.63%, and in 1915, 97.53'"r, and Second 
Amateur honors in 1916, 97.14%, and you have evidence enough to convince the most skeptical that Peters shells are a real contributor to the making of 
high scores. /f^X 

The amateur shooter who heeds the handwriting on the wall and decides to use thef IJj brand shells in 1917 is sure to make '.he best scores of which 
he is capable. nS_^ 



]!We extend to the members of the shooting fraternity our best wishes for the Ne<^ Year, Including "1007," happiness and a "straight 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO.. 



run" of 365 prosperous days. 

bSancS''°^" 585-587 Howard Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




WfMCHESTER 

Nickel Steel Repeaters, Extra Light 

Nickel Steel, which has about twice the tensile strength of the steel comn-xonly used 
in guns, is utilized entirely in the construction of the Winchester Model 1912 re- 
peating shotgun ; and, consequently, it is the lightest and strongest repeater on the 
market. It is also considered the handsomest. It is made in 12, 16 and 20 gauges, and 
although on the market but a short time, is now the biggest selling repeater. Get one. 

Use INC H 1ST £ k "Leader" or "Repeater" shells in Winchester guns, and 
in guns of any make, as on account of their patented construction and uniform 
loading they always give the best results. Winchester shells were used by the winner 
of the Grand American Handicap. 




Dr. Atkinson's Winning Revolver 
Target. 50-Shot Score, 469 




WIN NEW REVOLVER AND PISTOL 

SHOOTING HONORS WITH 

UMC ^ 

A new revolver shooting record is the resvrft of ihe Annual Outdoor 
Pistol and Revolver Championship Contests just completed by the United 
States Revolver Association. 

Dr. A. n. Atkinson, West View, Pa., made a match record of 469, which 
givos him the Outdoor Revolver Championship of the United States. 
Dr. Atkinson shoots and prefers Remington UMC. 

The pistol championship was won by that master marksman, George 
Armstrong of San Francisco, with a score of 474. Mr. Armstrong uses 
Remington UMC .22 Long Rifle Lesmok cartridges for all of his shooting. 

For either practice or championship shooting you may rely upon 
Remington UMC metalllcs to give the maximum accuracy. 

The Remington Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Company. Inc. 

Woolworth Building New York City 




Mr. Armstrong's Winning Pistol 
Tjrget, 50-Shot Score. 474 




Championship of California!!! 

PACIFIC COAST HANDICAP 1915 

HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE, VERNON GUN CLUB, 
Los Ang«l*s, July 2, 3 and 4, 1916 

493 ex 500 TARGETS 

All of the above winnings were made by Mr. Henry Pfirrmann Jr. , witli liis 34 inch 
double barrel 

PARKER GUN 

Highest Ollicial General Average for li»I4 ami 191,") was made with tlie 

PARKER GUN 

(f Intereited in small bore guns write for instructive booklet which will l>« sent free 
on raquaat. For further particulars rerardinK runs from I to 2S cause, address 
rARKBn BROS., Merlden, Conn. New York Salesroom. S2 Warren •trasti 

•r A. W. duBray, Realdlnp Agent, San Francisco, P. O. Bex 1M 



—TRAINING THE HOUND = 

A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE TRAINING OF FOX HOUNDS, BEAQLES, 

AND COON HOUNDS. 

The sy.stem of training advocated is simple and effective, so that anyone who car- 
ries out instructions can easily develop a foxhound, a beagle or a coon dog to the 
highest state of usefulness or organize a pack in which each hound will work independ- 
ently and at the same time harmoniously with the others. The subjects are: The 
Hound's Ancestry. History, Instinctive Tendencies. English and Native Hounds. Devel- 
oping the Intelligence, Training the Foxhound, Voices and Pace of the Hound, Quali- 
ties of Scent. Manners. Training the Coon Dog, Coon Hunting, Training the Beagle. 
Forming a Pack, Field Trial Handling, Faults and Vices, Conditioning, Selecting and 
Rearing Puppies. Kennels and Yards, Diseases of Hounds and Their Treatment. The 
chapters on field trial training and handling are alone worth the price of the book, 
which is one that every man who loves the voice, of a hound should read. 

The book contains 224 pages, is clearly printed, nicely bound, and handsomely Illus- 
trated with bloodhounds, various types of Engli-sh and American foxhounds, beagles 
and cross-bred dogs for 'possum and coon hunting. 

Price, In heavy paper cover, J1; J1.50, postpaid. 



ADDRESS: 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

p. O. DRAWER 447. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




VOLUME LXX. No. 3. SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 1917. SubscrlpUon— $3.00 Per Year 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1917. 



Pleasanton Driving Park 

PLEASANTON. CALIFORNIA 

offers for service for the season of 1917 the following stallions: 

THE ANVIL 2.02 3-4 

Fastest trotting stallion ever offered for service in California 
and fifth fastest entire trotter in the world 

Son of Si. Valiant Vincent 2:11% (by St. Vincent 2:13% out of the triple 
pro.Jucer Grace Lee 2:29?4 by Electioneer 125): dam Amy Smith by Emperor 
Wilkes 2:20%. sire of Princess Eulalia (4) 2:09%, etc.; grandam by Hamble- 
tontan 539. 

The Anvil is regarded by Edward F. Geers as one of the very greatest trot- 
ters that he has ever raced. For five years the pair of Tennesseeans went to 
the races together and in that time were but twice unplaced, while winining a 
total of fifteen races, including the historic M. and M. 

As an individual he i.s most pleasing, not too large or coarse In any way but 
smoothly and compactly made and "all horse" in every line. He is a perfect 
headed, pure gaitcd trotter, with the very best of disposition, and is destined 
to become a very great sire of trotting speed. His opportunities in the stud 
have been very slight as he has been retired from racing only since the close 
of 1914. He was selected to head the stud at Pleasanton Driving Park not only 
cn account of his great qualities as a race trotter, but because one of his first 
foals. Anvilite (2) 2:22Vi. with a trial of ten seconds or more faster, was in 
every way the greatest colt trotter ever handled by C. L. DeKyder. The services 
of The .\nvil are rocommendcd to you without reserve. 

Fee for THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4, $50 with usual privilege 

Vernon McKinney 2:01 1-2 

Fastest member of the great family of McKinney 2:1i;4 
Sire of VERNA McKINNEY <2) 2:13 (his first foal raced), fastest two- 
year-old pacing filly of 1915, three-year-old record, 1916, 2:0914; 
VERNON DIABLO, mat. rec. half mile track 2:14!4, and DR. DYER 
(3) trial 2:12!4. 

Hon of Guy McKinney ?.'(>2o (by McKinney 2:11 ',4 out of I'lossie Drais by Guy 
Wilkes 2:la>i); dam Alaud Vernon by Mount Vernon 2:15V4. sire of the dams of 
Leata J. 2:03. etc.: grandam Mag by General McClellan. sire of the dams of 
Mack Mack 2:08, etc. 

Vernon McKinney's racing career was not an extensive one but will long be 
remembered for the excellence of his performances, as his winnings include a 
Chamber of Commerce stske in time very near the record for that event at the 
time, and he is the fastest of all the McKinneys. 

He is a horse of rare ciualities in the way of individual excellence, almost 
ideal in behavior and temperament in harne.ss or out. Since his retirement he 
has been a popular horse in the .stud and our claim that he would prove a very 
great sire of pacing speed has been fully substantiated, his first foal to be raced 
being the season champion for the age and gait in 1915. a most excellent testi- 
monial to hi.s potency. He is a very sure breeder, his get are uniformly endowed 
with natural speed and the jihysioal and mental requirements of modern race 
hories and liiid ready sale at nicst gratifying price.s. 

Fee for VERNON McKINNEY 2:01 1-2, $50 with usual privilege. 

The best of cara taken of mares in any manner owners may desire, but no 
responsibility assumed for accidents or escapes. Address for particulars 



GEORGE F. RYAN, Superintendent, 



PLEASANTON, CAL. 



Thoroughbred sire M ARSE ABE 

WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1917 AT 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK 

Service Fee $50 

Marse Abe carries the best , uinjoQ ) Virgil 

blood of America through his f Hanover ' ' Florence 

sire lines. Yankee was a su- | ( Bourbon Belle ^ Bonnie Scotland 

perior race horse and sire. Han- U I Yankee , (Ella D. 

over was the best horse of her CO I I ( mniyar . I Alarm 

day. and headed the list of win- < I Correction. , ■ 1 Ilira 

ning sires for years. No refer- y ! ( Mannie Gray.. ] f-."''^'''",';'' 

ence is necessary to Hindoo as 1 

everyone knows what he was. gic \ i o, ( "ermlt ] ?AY,winn 

Halo, the dam of Marse Abe, < St. Blaise ... I ?,« Js?Ls 

is bred just right to cross w-ith ^ Halo. .. ! Srenne 

the sire blood in his pedigree; i f Phaeton 

a daughter of St. Blaise, son of | K < ^"^ Alfonso... .j 

Hermit, the most fa.shion.able / Lerna /Asteroid 

sire line in England, and backed i-eriia ^ Laura 

up on her dam's side by the 
lines of long distance perform- 
ers from which sprung Ten CFO F RYAN 
Brock and other four-milers. ^^W. r . r«. ■ Mi'V, 

Address all communications to PleSSSFltOII, Csi* 



DILLCARA 57462 



Son of Sidney Dillon 23157 (sire of 9 in 2:10 list) and Guycara by Guy Wilkes 
2867 (.sire of 3 in 2:10 list), will make the season of 1917 at 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK, PLEASANTON, CAL, 

SERVICE FEE $50 TO INSURE 

Dillcara is a full brother to Harold Dillon 39610, the leading sire of New Zealand. 
Last season the get of Harold Dillon won 41 races, totalling over $25,000. 
Address all communications to 

GEO. F. RYAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



MANHATTAN STOCK AND POULTRY 

FOOD AND REMEDIES 

Awarded Gold Medal 
at California State Fair 

ENDORSED BY THE LEADING HORSEMEN 
OF THE UNITED STATES 

Red Ball Stock Food Co., 

OAKLAND CAL. 




$10 Due on Two-Year-Olds 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1st. 1917 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stake No. 15.-"S5,150 

GIVEN BY THE PACIFIC COAST TROTTING HORSE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

FOR FOALS OF MARES BRED IN 1914 
FOR FOALS OF 1915 TO TROT OR PACE AT TWO AND 
THREE YEARS OLD 
$2800 FOR TROTTING FOALS $250 TO OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

$1800 FOR PACING FOALS $300 TO NOMINATORS OF DAMS OF WINNERS 

MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$2100 for Three-Year-Old Trolters. 

100 to the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry is named the 
Winner of the Three- Year-Old Trot. 
800 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 
50 to the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry is named 
the Winner of the Two-Year-Old 
Trot. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner 
of Three-Year-Old Trot when mare 
was bred. 



$1200 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

100 to the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry is named the 
Winner of the Three- Year-Old 
Pace. 

500 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
50 to the Nominator of the Dam on 

whose Original Entry Is named the 

Winner of the Two-Year-Old Pace. 
50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner 

of Three-Year-Old Pace when mare 

was bred. 



$150 in Special Prizes was paid to Stallion Owners In December, 1914 
ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on December 1. 1914, when 
name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to mu.st be ^ven; $5 March 1, 
1915; $5 Nov<mber 1. 1915; $10 on Yearlum's, May 1, 1916; $10 on Two-Year-Olds 
February 1, 1917; $10 on Three-Year-Olds February 1, 1918. 
STARTING PAYMENTS — $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace, $35 to start in the 
Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Ttiree-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start in 
the Three-Year-Old Trot. All startins payments to be made ten days before 
the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 
Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered 
is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start as Two- Yeir-Olds are not barred from starting again In the Three- 
Year-Old divisions. 



E. P. 



HEALD, 

President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 
Post Office Drawer 447, San Francisco, Cal. 



INSURE YOUR VALUABLE HORSES and CATTLE 

WITH THE 

"TWO HARTFORDS" 

LIVE STOCK INSURANCE THAT INSURES 

The Insurance of Show and Racing Stock A Specialty 

LIBERAL PRIVILEGES 

Address all inquiries to 

ROLAND C. DRAKE, Asst. Gen. Agent, 

PACIFIC LIVESTOCK DEPARTMENT, HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

*38 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Mantion Th* Braadar and Sportsman 



JOE CAREY 



$50 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION 



Bannookburn.. \ 



Haydi ii . j^rincc Cliarlie ; -^'lio.' 

Edwards ' Eastern Princess 

( Nannie Bay I Glen.ltr 

( Nannie Butler 



. Bettie Blaise.. 



Himyar.. 



Miss Marion.. 



. imp. .\stolat.. 



f'^l'™ 

I nira (Lcdngton 

I Hevlrn 

i Kiiber I Biieaneer 

. ' I Mineral 

( Bellicent ! Cremorne 

( Lynette by 
Lord Lyon 



Address all communications to: 



GEO. RYAN, Pleasanton, Caf. 



BREED TO THE COAST'S CHAMPION CAMPAIGNER AND FUTURITY SIRE 




Rec. 2:01 3-4. 
Reg. No. 44977 



Jim Logan 

Sire of Hal Logan 2:09, Maxine (3) 2:15, winner of 

Breeders' Futurity, etc. 
Son of CHARLES DERBY 2:20, brother to Klatawah 
(3) 2:051/2. etc-, "nd sire of TEN in 2:10. 
Dam, EFFIE LOGAN, dam of Jim Logan 2:01%, Sir 
Albert S. 2:03ii. and Dan Losaii 2:07'.^. 

In the stud, season of 1917, at Woodland Race Track. 
FEE: 550, usual return prlvileKe. $75 to insure liv- 
ing colt payable at time of service or before removal 
of marcs. Call at race track or addre.s-s 

J. ELMO MONTGOMERY, DavIS, Cal. 



NEW EDITION OF JOHN SPLAN'S BOOK 

"LIFE WITH THE TROTTER" 

PRICE $3.00 POSTPAID 
i kf BRSBIDBIR ajid BPORTBMAM, P. O. Dmwar 44T, 4aa Fra«alaaa> OmL 



Saturday, January 20, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 
(Established 1882.) 

Published every Saturday. 

F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 East 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year. J3; six months, $1.75; three months, Jl. 

Foreign postage Jl per year additional; Canadian postage 
BOc per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE PRELIMINARY WORK toward the holding 
of a good circuit of harness race meetings in Cali- 
fornia this year has been accomplished. An organi- 
tzaion has been effected, a circuit secretary engaged 
and over $600 raised toward a fund that will be used 
in assisting every fair and other organization that 
will give harness racing in securing a large list of 
entries and large fields of starters. Mr. J. S. Wad- 
dell, who has been selected as Secretary of this or- 
ganization, has already started to work and he will 
have the help of eveiy person who is interested in 
any way in seeing trotting and pacing racing restored 
to the prominent place it once occupied at our county 
and district fairs. Mr. Waddell has established his 
headquarters for the present at the office of the 
Breeder and Sportsman and will immediately get in 
touch with horsemen and fair associations through- 
out the State. Mr. Waddell is no raw recruit. He 
has had a great deal of experience in this line in 
Oregon and elsewhere and has built up successful 
circuits in sections where the population and the 
number of horses bred and trained are small in 
comparison with those in California. He is on the 
job now and proposes to stay on it until the Califor- 
nia harness racing circuit of 1917 is brought to a 
successful conclusion. He will soon start on a tour 
of the State and will inform himself thoroughly on 
the local conditions, so that he may be able to show 
the directors of associations just what, in his opin- 
ion, can be done in each county. If he receives the 
assistance he should there will be a circuit this year 
that will be not only successful financially and oth- 
erwise, hut will lead to an organization of fairs and 
race meetings that will be permanent and of great 
benefit to every breeder, owner and trainer of trot- 
ters and pacers on this coast. 

o 

A bill introduced in the California legislature by 
Senator Lyman King of San Bernardino county 
should pass, and if it becomes a law automobile rac- 
ing on the roads of the State, which has gotten to 
be quite a nuisance, will end. In a short paragraph 
of 24 words, at the very beginning of his bill, King 
has provided for the end of automobile racing on 
public highways as follows: "No races or contests 
for speed, whether on a bet or wager or otherwise, 
shall be held on any public highway of the state." 
King's bill, if passed, may be construed as prohib- 
iting racing against time, which has been a popular 
fad with big automobile concerns in years past. The 
auto concerns have on numerous occasions raced 
cars against time between San Francisco and Los 
Angeles for the purpose of making records and re- 
ceiving advertising. King's bill also provides for 
careful driving by prohibiting autoists from driving 
faster than 30 miles an hour at any time, compelling 
them not to exceed 20 miles an hour in built up com- 
munities, limiting them to a speed of 15 miles an 
hour in business districts of cities and limiting them 
to a speed of not more than 10 miles an hour where 
their view of the highway is partially obstructed. 
^ ❖ <5> 

Averhill Harriman, son of the late E. H. Harriman 
and famous light harness horse fancier, is banding 
together as strong a stable as money will buy to 
take down the Grand Circuit this year, it is reported. 
Mr. Harriman has purchased Baron Frisco, Dos I'a- 
los, and is searching for more material. He probably 
will have a few sons of John R. Gentry flying his 
colors. Will Dickerson, brother of John Dickerson, 
one of the well known Grand Circuit drivers, will 
have charge of the Harriman stable. 

❖ ❖ 

A new monument is to be erected over the grave 
of Goldsmith Maid 2:14 at Fashion Stud Farm, Tren- 
ton, New Jersey, where the famous old mare is 
buried. 



Fred Jamison, who is called King of the half mile 
track trainers, and who campaigned the great mare 
W.'lkes Brewer by Nutwood Wilkes last season, won 
over $22,000 in purses on half mile rings during 
191C. 

^ <S> <S> 

One ol the oldest horses whose deaths have been 
reported in recent years was Fanny, owned by Mrs. 
Jennie Vanderheyden, of Troy, N. Y., who died a few 
days ago at the age of forty-three. She was in 
service up to a short time before. 

<?> ❖ <S> 

The flivver, standing at Sixth avenue and Thirty- 
sixth street, New York, was new, shiny and appar- 
ently quite sound. It had a fur lap robe over its 
radiator. Directly in front of it stood a Bering Sea 
victoria to w'hich was attached an ex-horse, old, 
muddy and unquestionably unsound. He wore no 
blanket, opera cloak or muffler. There was but one 
thing for the whistling newsboy to do, which was to 
transfer the robe from the auto to the horse, and he 
did it without delay or apparent qualm of conscience. 
For a moment he stood surveying the fur clad 
charger. "Atta boy," he said contentedly, after 
which he went whistling down Sixth avenue. — Ex. 

o 

WHY FARMERS SHOULD BREED MORE DRAFT 
HORSES. 



The danger of overproduction of horses is remote. 
It costs more to produce them than any other class 
of livestock. For that reason many farmers sit back 
and proclaim that it doesn't pay to raise horses; that 
there never was a time when the horse market was 
so dull as now; that the motor truck and tractor 
have killed the horse business and the horse is a 
thing of the past. Some people believe all of this, 
even though the truth of the matter is the opposite. 
Those who have allowed such thoughts to direct 
their operations for the past five to ten years will 
soon see the error of their ways. It takes time to 
make much headway in the horse business. Five 
years are needed to grow a horse. At best one should 
not expect more than two colts from three mares as 
an average per year. Moreover, not more than 16 
per cent of our farmers are raising colts. Not long 
hence the American farmer will wake up only to 
learn that a great opportunity has passed. The next 
ten years is bound to see the greatest demand for 
horseflesh the world has ever known. It can't be 
met on short notice. The man who is breeding every 
mare old enough to the best stallion available and 
is taking proper care of the offspring is the man who 
is sure to be rewarded. There are plenty of men who 
have bought and paid for farms within the past ten 
years by their pure bred draft mares. In the same 
community there are farmers who are no better off 
financially than they were a decade ago because 
they failed to foresee the profits from using the right 
kind of horses in their farm work. The men who 
have made money and who are going to reap the 
fruits of their efforts in the future are those who 
early saw the undeniable need for heavy draft horses 
for farm work; who bred that kind and who will 
continue to do so without a halt. 

Why is there a general tendency among farmers 
to buy their horses rather than to raise them? 
Farmers say, "I don't want to be bothered with a 
colt. When I get ready to plant corn or cut wheat 
I want horses ready to work, I don't want to have to 
pay $25 for a little scrub colt and then have all the 
bother to raise it, besides." Men with such ideas 
have to buy a horse or two nearly every spring at 
a cost o£ $150 to $250 a head. Instead of having a 
horse or two to buy, better have some to sell. There 
is no unusual training necessary. Any farmer can 
raise good horses if he will only use common sense. 
He can even succeed with pure bred drafters if he 
will select good parent stock, take reasonably good 
care of them and develop the offspring rightly. 
Therein lies the secret of success. 

A careful consideration of the situation cannot fail 
to convince us that there is no danger of an over- 
production of heavy draft horses for our farm and 
city uses. Almost a million horses and mules have 
been exported from this country in the last 27 months 
for use in war. These figures show almost one horse 
or mule taken for every twenty-five left. As surely 
as this war continues another two years, good farm 
horses will be at a premium; and even after the war 
is over, exports will not cease, for thousands of 
horses will be needed to start European agriculture 
anew. 

It follows, as a necessary consequence, that the 
demand for purebred draft horses for breeding pur- 
poses will continue to be good. Importations have 
been, to all practical purposes, cut off. We are pro- 
ducing only twelve or thirteen thousand purebred 
draft horses eligible to registry. This means, in sub- 
stance, that we are producing only five or six thou- 
sand stallions fit for service per year, when we need 
at least seven or eight thousand. An excess of de- 
mand over supply always makes good prices, and 
the present is no exception. 

The farmer who uses heavy draft mares does bet- 
ter farm work, and raises bigger crops, than he who 
relies on small horses or tractors . Furthermore, he 
has horses to sell each spring, at a profit. If you 
don't believe it, go ask any country banker for the 
names of the most successful farmers in his neigh- 
borhood. You will find tlieni to be livestock farmers, 
and men who keep and use heavy draft mares, either 
grade or purebred, in their farm work. 



APPRECIATED EDITORIAL COMMENT. 



[Mexico, Mo., Intelligencer.] 

Curtis P. ("Jump") Cauthorn departed Tuesday 
afternoon for San Francisco, Cal., where he has 
become interested in the Breeder and Sportsman, a 
journal devoted to live stock and sports, as its name 
indicates. 

Since he became associate editor of The Missouri 
Stockman three years ago, Cauthorn acquired the 
reputation of being one of the leading writers on 
live stock topics in the country. Having come of a 
family of pure-bred live stock and Saddle Horse 
breeders, and himself a breeder and dealer in Saddle 
Horses of considerable extent, "Jump" Cauthorn was 
able to write from first hand, technical knowledge of 
stock shows in a manner that attracted the attention 
of stockmen all over America. 

As associate editor of The Stockman, his work was 
varied. His account of a sale of Shorthorn cattle 
conducted a year ago by S. P. Emmons & Son, was 
handled in a style that caused R. L. Harriman, the 
noted live stock auctioneer, to declare it a master- 
piece from a standpoint of live stock reporting. The 
Missouri Stockman made for him the reputation that 
has grown nation-wide. 

[Spirit of the West.] 

Announcement is made in the Missouri Stockman's 
Christmas number, which, by the way, is the finest 
number that publication has ever gotten out, that 
Mr. Jackson, the owner, has sold out and that it will 
be taken over by the Breeder and Sportsman, of San 
Francisco. Jumps Cauthorn, who has been editor 
for the past two years, will go to the coast as man- 
aging editor of the two combined papers. 

The Missouri Stockman was established in 1914. 
During its life it has overcome many obstacles and 
has continued to improve each year. Devoted largely 
to the interests of the great American Saddle Horse, 
it was one of the snappiest and newsiest publications 
which came to our exchange desk, and one which we 
looked forward to with pleasure Mr. Cauthorn as- 
sumed his editorial duties about two years ago, and 
during that time has "made good" in every sense of 
the word. 

The Breeder and Sportsman was established in 
1882, and is one of the best publications in the coun- 
try today. Mr. Cauthorn says that he intends to 
devote a department to the saddle horses of the Mid- 
dle West, even though he is far away, so the readers 
of The Missouri Stockman may still feel (hat they 
have not lost him. While his many friends will re- 
gret to see him leave this part of the country, the 
Breeder and Sportsman is certainly to be congratu- 
lated upon getting such a capable man on their edi- 
torial staff. 

[Farmers' Horse Journal.] 

The holiday number of the Missouri Stockman 
came to me last week in a very attractive and profit- 
able dress of many brilliant articles and handsome 
advertising cards. But I ain sorry to note that the 
Stockinan is to come to me no more, as its owner, 
Rufus Jackson, has sold out, field and equipment to 
tho Breeder and Sportsman of San Francisco, Cal. 
Mr. Jump Cauthorn goes with it, as managing editor 
of Breeder and Sportsman, said papers to converge 
into a complete live stock periodical. While the 
Breeder and Sportsman is already one of the best 
and ablest papers of its class published in America, 
we dislike very much to give up the Missouri Stock- 
man ,for Missouri's sake. We dislike very much, too, 
to lose Mr. Cauthorn from Missouri, as he is an en- 
thusiastic horseman, a tireless worker, with a con- 
geniality of spirit that makes him a drawing card 
wherever he goes. What we lose, the Pacific Coast 
will gain, and we believe he will do all in his power 
toward husbanding the promises of the live stock 
industry of the West. 

[Columbia, Mo., Tribune.] 

Missouri has lost another one of her best news- 
paper men. This time "Jump" Cauthorn has cast 
his future with the state that elected Woodrow Wil- 
son President of the United States for a second 
term, for immediately after he completed a holiday 
edition of the Missouri Stockman, of which he has 
been the editor for several years, he left for San 
Francisco, where he will become associated with the 
Breeder and Sportsman. 

There is no better known or better liked news- 
paper man in Missouri than "Jump" Cauthorn, and 
he is not only known in Missouri but all over the 
Central West and by reputation all over the United 
States. 

"Jump" is a horse editor, a real horse editor, who 
know.« pedigrees of horses and can repeat them from 
memory with tho same efficient degree of accuracy 
that William Jennings Bryan speaks his "Prince of 
Peace." He has attended all the important horse 
shows in all sections of the country for several years 
and knows not only the horses and their breeding, 
but also their owners and trainers. He probably 
knows more stockmen than any one In Missouri. 

The Tribune predicts success for Mr. Cauthorn 
and joins his many friends in wishing him success in 
his new field. 

o 

Guy Boy, by Frank Turner's horse Guy Dillon, won 
a race on the ice at Toronto, Canada, December 23d, 
and got two heats and won second money a few days 
later when the race was In faster time, Guy Boy 
winning the second heat In 2:22V4. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1917. 



Harness Horses and Horsemen 



CIRCUIT OF FAIRS ASSURED. 



One and Probably Two Will Be Organized in Cali- 
fornia This Year. 

In response to a call issued by Secretary F. W. 
Kelley of the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders 
Association, representatives of nine associations tiiat 
will give fairs in California this year met in the 
Pacific Building, San Francisco, on Tuesday after- 
noon, January 16th, and discussed the question of 
arranging dates for these fairs which would provide 
for a continuous circuit with the shortest possible 
shipments for the live stock and other exhibitors 
who desire to show their stock and race their horses 
at these fairs . The meeting was called to order by 
Secretary Kelley and Mr. I. L. Borden, director of 
the State Agricultural Society, was placed in nom- 
ination for chairman by Secretary C. W. Paine of 
the Stale Board of Agriculture. Mr. Borden was 
unanimously elected to preside and Mr. F. W. Kelley 
was then elected secretary of the conference. 

The associations that were officially represented 
at the meeting were as follows: 

Alameda Fair Association — E. E. Hall. 

Salano County Fair Association — Harry Mc- 
Fadyen. 

State Agricultural Society — C. W. Paine. 
Fresno County Fair Association— J. H. Dicken- 
son. 

Korn County Fair Association — J. W. Jennings. 

Riverside County Fair — C. H. Lewis. 

Ventura County Fair — L. T. Hathaway. 
The tracks that were represented were as follows: 

Pleasanton — George Ryan. 

Santa Rosa — C. Donovan. 

Woodland — Chas. Silva. 
After considerable discussion is was found that 
there were not enough weeks after the State Fair 
at Sacramento and before the opening of the usual 
rainy season to permit all the places south of Sac- 
ramento who desire to have a place on the circuit to 
secure dates. Finally a motion was made and carried 
that the following tentative dates be allotted to the 
different fairs: 

Santa Rosa, August 20-27. 

Dixon, August 27-September 2. 

Woodland, September 3-6. 

Sacramento, September 8-16. 

Pleasanton, September 17-22. 

Modesto, September 24-29. 

Fresno, October 1-6. 

Hanford, October 8-12. 
The representatives from Bakersfleld, Riverside 
and Ventura were very positive that their associa- 
tions would not consent to hold their fairs on dates 
later than October 1-6, and they finally concluded 
they could not accept such dates. Consequently their 
dates ■will probably be about as follows: 

Los Angeles, August 27-September 2. 

Riverside, September 17-22. 

Ventura, September 24-29. 

Bakersfleld, October 1-6. 

Visalia, October 22-27. 
Of these five fairs, but three (Riverside, Ventura 
and Bakersfleld) are certain, but should Los Angeles 
and Visalia decide to hold fairs an excellent Southern 
California circuit would thus be provided. 

As the State Agricultural Society has fixed its 
dates as given above and cannot change them the 
dates following it are necessarily limited. Thus, 
in a State which for several years has held but few 
fairs and had many vacant dates, the situation has 
changed so that during the fall season there are 
more places asking for dates than can be accommo- 
dated. 

After the adjournment of the conference, a meeting 
of the horsemen and track owners was held and an 
organization of the California Fair and Racing As- 
sociation was effected, which is reported elsewhere 
in this issue of the Breeder and Sportsman. 

o 

Lived Twenty-Six Years. 

During the latter part of the year just passed Mr. 
Geo. L. Warlow, of Fresno, had his old favorite 
Athadon put to death by chloroform. Athadon was 
foaled in 1890 and was bred and owned during his 
entire lifetime by J.Ir. Warlow. His sire was the 
Onward stallion Matadon to which horse Mr. Warlow 
bred his mare Athalie by Harkaway before bringing 
her to California. In November, 1891 at Stockton, 
Athadon trotted a mile in 2:27 and became the 
world's champion yearling stallion, a record he held 
until Adbell put the mark at 2:23 at San Jose in 
1894. Placed in the stud Athadon had a limited op- 
portunity, yet he sired a number of fast performers, 
and up to the close of 1916 had sired 18 standard 
performers, had three producing sons and four pro- 
ducing daughters. His fastest performers were the 
trotters Athasham 2:09ii and Donasham (4) 2:09%, 
and the pacers Dick W. 2:06»A and The Donna 
2:07%. 



Jim Logan 2:01% Will Be at Woodland This Season. 

The most popular race horse in California, hero of 
many a hard fought battle, winner of the fastest 
heat ever paced in this State, a tried sire and one 
of the best bred pacers that ever stood for public 
service, J. Elmo Montgomery's horse Jim Logan, will 
make the season of 1917 at the Woodland race track, 
where he made his record, and where he has a friend 
and admirer in every house where there is anyone 
who knows a pacing horse from a traction engine. 
Jim Logan's name is a household word in that sec- 
tion and on the day when it is known at the county 
fair that Jim Logan will start, the grand stand is 
always full and the "standing room only" sign is out. 
Mr. Montgomery has placed Jim Logan's service fee 
this year at $50, or $75 to insure a living foal. These 
are liberal terms for a horse of Jim Logan's breeding 
and speed and should bring him a number of the best 
bred mares in California, especially as he has shown 
his ability to sire race winners and speed of the 
highest order. His first foal to start, the Ally Max- 
ine, won the Pacific Breeders' Futurity as a three- 
year-old, taking a record in that race of 2:15, and 
the race went to five heats. Hal Logan 2:09 is 
another of Jim Logan's get that was in the limelight 
this year and after taking a time record of 2:09 at 
Santa Rosa, went to Phoenix and was a close second 
every heat of the race in which that sensational 
pacer Zombrino won in 2:07V4, 2:07 and 2:06i,4. This 
son of Jim Logan is expected to pace very close to 
his sire's record during the coming season. Owners 
of mares should read Mr. Montgomery's advertise- 
ment in this issue of the Breeder and Sportsman and 
correspond with him. Excellent pasturage will be 
furnished all mares sent to Jim Logan's court and 
the charges will be reasonable. 

At the Phoenix Track. 

Phoenix, Arizona, where the training track is in 
good shape all winter, is quartering about fifty trot- 
ters and pacers at the present time. The California 
trainer Ted Bunch has charge of Dr. J. G. Belt's sta- 
ble of horses, consisting of the big winner Zombrino, 
p. 2:06Vj; Wynetta, p. 2:04%; Evermore, p. 2: 14 14; 
Kildare, green trotter by Zombro; Jewell Tolus, 
green trotter by Pactolus; Pactolus Chief, p. 2:22\i, 
by Pactolus, and a promising three-year-old trotter 
by Dr. Wayo 2: 12 ',4. The topliners in this stable will 
be raced through the Great Western Circuit the com- 
ing season. Orin Carmen, son of Fred Carmen, of 
Kansas City, has the Pollock stable from Flagstaff, 
Ari'3., mostly colts and fillies by The Northern Man, 
Dean Hall, Vernon McKinney, and other sires. Car- 
men has twelve head in his stable at present. He 
will be remembered as the young man that was with 
Arlie Frost so long, and had charge of Knight of 
Strathmore when that horse was such a great three- 
year-old. W. T. McNab, formerly of Hutchinson, 
Kans., has Santa Fe, an own brother to Sherlock 
Holmes p. 2:06i,4, and several promising young trot- 
ters and pacers. Lesta Selman has a number of very 
likely youngsters by Prince Zombro, James Otis and 
Dr. Clark, and from the bunch expects to have sev- 
eral good enough to race next fall. Wm. Best is win- 
tering Lillian Van 2: 11 14 and the fast green trotter 
The Shriner, by Colonel Green, by Zombro. 

Fast Colt By Best Policy. 

The boys at Pleasanton are talking a good deal 
these days about the three-year-old trotter men- 
tioned in the Breeder and Sportsman last week 
which is by Best Policy and out of the mare Miss 
Zom B. by Zombro. He is owned by Mr. H. E. 
Middleton of Oakland and is being trained by Jay 
Frank. The latter says this colt is the fastest nat- 
ural trotter he ever saw and Millard Sanders says 
he ought to trot in two minutes. The only trouble 
with the colt is that he doesn't like the bit and fights 
it. He can trot a two-minute lick right now and if 
Frank succeeds in getting him under control he will 
have a sensational trotter beyond a doubt. Frank 
is going easy with him, and is trying a bridle without 
a bit that Havis James used on some of his horses 
when at Pleasanton. George Ryan dug this contriv- 
ance up the other day and loaned it to Frank who 
is giving it a trial. This colt is a peculiarly bred 
fellow . His sire Best Policy is by Allerton out of 
Expedition. His dam is by Zombro, second dam by 
Stam B. and third dam the dam of Zombro. If he 
ever learns to race he will be one of the fastest trot- 
ters ever seen in California. Mr. Frank has four 
head in his string at Pleasanton ,two by Best Policy 
and two by Red Cloak Jr. out of mares by Prince 
Nutwood. 

Mr. Rudolph Spreckels Owns Two Good Prospects. 

Millard Sanders has found a mighty promising 
pacer in Mr. Rudolph Spreckels' chestnut mare by 
Washington McKinney out of Annie Rooney 2:17 by 
Strathway. Sanders took this mare out of pasture 
where she had been running out for two years last 
October and is not yet giving her anything like hard 
work, but she paced a quarter for him in 32% sec- 
onds the other day, and he says she is as promising 
a pacer as he has seen for a long time. Mr. Spreck- 
els' trotting mare by Washington McKinney out of 
Hulda 2:08% is also showing up well. She can show 
a 2:30 gait any time she is given her head, and being 
a good individual and a square trotter is considered 
a real prospect by the man who holds the record of 
having trained and driven the first trotter to reach 
the two-minute mark — Lou Dillon 1:58^. 



WILL PROMOTE HARNESS RACING. 

California Fair and Racing Association Organized 
and Officers Elected. 



Active and energetic promotion of a season of 
harness racing in California is to be entered upon 
immediately by an organization of harness horse 
breeders and owners called the California Fair and 
Racing Association which has elected as its officials, 
Mr. L. L. Cannon, a prominent farmer and live stock 
breeder of Sonoma county, as president; J. Elmo 
Montgomery, an extensive Yolo county farmer and 
owner of the famous pacer Jim Ixsgan 2:01%, as 
vice-president; and the popular capitalist, farmer 
and horse breeder, I. L. Borden of San Francisco, 
as treasurer. Joseph S. Waddell, formerly of Baker, 
Oregon, but now of California, was elected secretary. 
Mr. Waddell is the man who so successfully promot- 
ed and managed the Inter-Mountain circuit last year, 
and who was induced to come to California to en- 
gage in promoting and organizing a California cir- 
cuit. It will be Mr. Waddell's duty to start in im- 
mediately to get as many of the California associa- 
tions that will give fairs and race meetings in 1917 
into line, and to also make an effort to get towns 
where tracks are situated and that will not give 
fairs to hold harness race meetings, even though 
they may give only a program of a day or two. The 
idea is to try and boost and encourage the sport of 
cle.^n harness racing, which as all know is one of 
the most popular of American sports. 

After the meeting of representatives of a number 
of CaliFomia fair associations called to organize a 
fair circuit and select dates for the various fairs to 
be held in the State had agreed upon a tentative 
schedule of dates, and adjourned, the horsemen and 
others present at the meeting were urged by J. Elmo 
Montgomery to organize, raise some money and em- 
ploy an organizer and promoter of a harness racing 
circuit to hold meetings in conjunction with the 
fairs and otherwise. Mr. Montgomery's proposal was 
heartily entered into and within a few minutes over 
$600 was pledged to the association. The contrib- 
utors were Messrs. M. L. Woy, C. F. Silva, L. L. 
Cannon, I. L. Borden, G. J. Giannini, L- H. Todhunter- 
Fresno Fair Association, Santa Rosa Association, 
State Fair Association, C. A. Durfee, J. E. Montgom- 
ery and others. 

Mr. Waddell will establish an office and will visit 
the different towns where fairs and race meetings 
are to be or may be held and will be prepared to 
demonstrate by conservative and accurate figures 
just how much money is required to carry through 
to a financial success a program of harness racing. 
Mr .Waddell has had extensive and successful experi- 
ence and his success has been due to the fact that 
while he is an energetic promoter he is also a con- 
servative one and does not try to induce fair or rac- 
ing organizations to give any larger programs than 
they can afford to and which conditions, location and 
other things will justify. Mr. Waddell is not work- 
ing for the immediate present, but for the future 
and states that he fully realizes that if he succeeds 
in promoting a successful circuit this year, he will 
be asked to proceed with the work next year and 
years to follow. He believes that he can arrange a 
program of purses that will draw a big list of entries 
for every place on the circuit and he has already 
started to work with that idea in view, and the fur- 
ther idea of making every race program a profitable 
one for the organization backing it. It looks now 
very much as though a better California circuit than 
has been seen in many years will be the result of 
the organization of the California Fair and Racing 
Association. 



A Grandly Bred Horse at Midway Farm, Nebraska. 

The well known breeder E. D. Gould, of Kearney, 
Neb., whose horses are now being trained by J. B. 
Stetson at Sacramento, recently bought Lord Roberts 
2:07^4 at the dispersal sale of the Riverside Farm, 
Weston, W. Va., and the son of Arion and Nancy 
Hanks will spend the balance of his days at Mr. 
Gould's Midway Farm where he will share the hon- 
ors of the stud with Bingen Silk 2:07^4 and Robert 
Bingen 2:15V6. It is needless to say that Lord 
Roberts will have exceptional opportunities in his 
new location for Mr. Gould has collected a band of 
brood mares unexcelled in the West. Lord Roberts, 
in spite of the handicap which was placed on him 
by the out-of-the-way location of Riverside Farm, has, 
during the past three years, justified the judgment 
which led to his purchase by his late owner and it 
may be confidently asserted now that his reputation 
as a sire will be greatly increased during the next 
few years. From present indications he will be to 
the Arion branch of the Electioneer family what Bin- 
gen is to the May King branch and Walnut Hall is to 
the Conductor branch and, to carry the comparison 
farther, what Peter the Great is to the Pilot Medium 
branch of Happy Medium's family. 

o 

Three Meetings at Charter Oak Track. 

The Connecticut Fair Association at Hartford has 
certainly shown itself a friend of the trotting horse 
breeder as it has already advertised three good meet- 
isgn for 1917. The first will be on May 30th, when 
four races at half mile heats will be given with 
purses from $200 to $400. The next will be on July 
4th with $400 each for the 2:15 pace and 2:24 trot, 
$500 for a 2:15 trot and $1500 for a free-for-all 



Saturday, January 20, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



pace. These races will be held on the half mile 
track. The big fair will be held in September and a 
bunch of eight early closing purses is already an- 
nounced. The $5000 Charter Oak is for the 2:12 
class trotters, The Yankee is $.3000 for 2:08 class 
trotters, the Acorn for three-year-old trotters of the 
2:20 class is for $2000, the Nutmeg, 2000, is for 
two-year-old trotters, and the Double O is a $1500 
purse for 2:20 class trotters on the half mile track. 
For the pacers there is the Connecticut, $3000, for 
the free-for-all class, the Hartford, $2500, for the 
2:08 class, and the Capitol, $2500, for the 2:12 class. 
A new feature is The Battle Royal which will be a 
$3000 purse for trotters with win race records of 
2:07 or faster. In this event the horses will race 
two heats of a mile and a half, trotting around the 
halt mile track and then around the mile track. The 
money is to be divided $1300 for each heat and $400 
to the horse standing best in the summary. In the 
event of a tie the horse standing best in the second 
heat will be awarded the $400. The $1300 for each 
heat will be divided as follows: $300 to the four 
leading horses when they pass the half mile, $150 to 
first, $75 to second, $45 to third and $30 to fourth. 
$1000 to the four leading horses at the finish of the 
mile and a half— $500 to first, $250 to second, $150 to 
third and $100 to fourth. This is an entirely new 
plan of racing and should make a most interesting 
race. The old saying that "they don't pay off at the 
half mile pole" will not apply to this race, and the 
sprinters should make the first half mile as interest- 
ing as the long distance trotters will make the last 
full mile. 

The Horse vs. The Automobile. 

Every little while some man bobs up with a long 
spie! about how the automobile is going to put the 
horse out of business, and that right soon. We have 
been hearing the same thing for the past five or six 
years. Recently some automobile salesman, writing 
in one of the Sunday papers, explained at some 
length just why the horse was doomed to go, and 
predicted that in ten years horses would be as much 
of a novelty on the average city street as the auto- 
mobile was ten years ago. 

The Department of Commerce at Washington, 
D. C, reports that during the month of October, 1916, 
29,590 horses and 15,309 mules were exported to for- 
eign countries, the value of which is given as $9,719,- 
594. For the ten months ending with October 31, the 
exports are given as 239,894 horses and 106,334 mules, 
or a total of 345,288 head, with a value of $74,700,433. 
During the same period in 1915 the number of horses 
exported is given as 391,059 and 105,238 mules, or a 
total of 496,297 head, valued at $104,388,930. 

In the last report, issued by the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture and received at this office 
this week, is a table showing the average prices of 
horses for the two years past in each state in the 
Union. The average price of the entire counti-y in 
1915 was $127.03 per head, while in 1916 it was 
$129.45, an increase of $2.42 per head. Not much, to 
be sure, when you look at it singly, but when we stop 
to think of the number of horses in the country, the 
figures show up pretty large. 

The Year Book of the Department of Agriculture, 
published in 1915, gives the number of horses in the 
United States from 1867 to the time the book was 
published, with the average value per head and the 
total value, for each year. In 1867 there were 5,401,- 
000 horses, worth on an average of $59.05 per head. 
This was, of course, long before automobiles were 
dreamed of, or auto salesmen heard of. It was about 
1904 when the automobile men began to ring the 
death knell of the horse. At that time therewere 
16,736,000 horses, worth on an average of $67.93 per 
head, and 2.758,000 mules, worth $78.93 per head. At 
the time the 1915 Year Book was published there 
were 21,195,000 horses, with an average value of 
$103.33 ner head, and 4,479,000 mules, worth $112.36 
per head, or a grand total of 2.'^, 674, 000 horses and 
mules, with a total value of $2,693,373,000. Of course, 
the number of animals exported during the last three 
years are included in these figures, but the increase 
in the average value during the period from 1904, 
when it was $67.93 per head, to the present time, 
when it is $129.45 per head, would not seem to cor- 
respond very well with the claims of the automobile 
men that horses are a thing of the past. — [Spirit of 
the West. 

o 

To call a horse a mongrel that is sired by a stand- 
ard and registered trotter, whose first and second 
dams were sired by registered trotters and whose 
third dam is by a thoroughbred stallion, is an absurd 
proposition, and yet this is what the California Stal- 
lion license law does unless the owner of such a 
stallion registers him as Non-Standard, which really 
means nothing. A horse whose pedigree is as above 
given had the word Mongrel written on his last 
year's license in this State, yet he is a better bred 
horse than many that are licensed as standard. 
• • • 

North Randall's third race track will soon be a 
reality. Work of unloading cinders to build the jog- 
ging course has started, and it is believed trainers 
will have a first-class place to work horses on wet 
days by spring. This cinder path is to encircle the 
mile ring at North Randall. On the east side the 
patch will widen into a 50-foot strip, where trainers 
may speed for an eighth of a mile. 



Thousands Will Go to See This Match Race. 

Ben Earl 2:00^^ and Peter Stevens 2:011^ may 
come together in a match race next July. W. B. 
Eckerl, Reading, Pa., recently stated that he would 
match Peter Stevens against any pacer in the world 
over a half mile track, and now conies Ed. Peterson, 
of Omaha, Nebraska, who says he is ready to race 
his horse Ben Earl against Peter Stevens on a half 
mile track for any amount from $1000 to $2500 a 
side and has already posted $500 with The Western 
Horseman for a forfeit to hold good until Januai-y 
23d, or twenty days from the time he accepted the 
challenge. Mr. Peterson says any date tween July 
1st and 18th, and any track will suit him, and wants 
the race play or pay, winner to take all. The Horse- 
man says Ben Earl had but little racing over the 
half mile tracks during the season of 1916, most of 
his campaigning being over the mile rings, but in 
1915, previous to becoming a member of the Peter- 
son stable, the uusexed son of The Earl won eleven 
straight races over the Western two-lap courses and 
took a record of 2:11%. Last season Ben Earl, raced 
by Harvin Childs, made a wonderful campaign and 
proved to be the leading money winning pacer of 
the year, with something like $12,000 to his credit. 
He met the best stake pacers in the land at Colum- 
bus and Lexington, and beat them, taking a record of 
2: 00 14 when he beat an all-star cast in the $3,000 
Arch City stake at Columbus. 

Peter Stevens was the most consistent pacer that 
raced on the Grand Circuit in 1914, when he won 
ten out of eleven races in his campaign down the 
Big Ring . In 1915 the son of Peter the Great 2:07^4 
was raced seven times on the half mile tracks and 
was defeated but once, this defeat coming in the 
match race with Directum I 1:56% at Allentown, Pa., 
when the chestnut stallion headed him in the sum- 
mary in what proved to be a record-breaking three- 
heat race over a half mile track. Directum I won 
the first and third heats in 2:051/^ and 2:06, while 
Peter Stevens won the second in 2:04. He won at 
Lebanon, Pa., when he paced the second heat in 
2:04%; at Kutztown, Pa., the second heat in 2:04 
and third in 2:05'A; and in a battle against the 
watch at West Chester, Pa., paced in 2:04'/4. At Lex- 
ington he was twice second to Napoleon Direct 
1:59%, forcing the son of Walter Direct 2:05% to 
pace in 2:00%, and back in the same notch in their 
second race at the Blue Grass track. Last season, 
at Columbus, Peter Stevens forced Napoleon Direct 
to lower his record to 1:59%, giving Mr. Geers, who 
piloted Napoleon Direct ,the opportunity of taking 
his first ride in two minutes or better, and was timed 
separately in two minutes. Ke took his record 
against time at North Randall, and later, at Lexing- 
ton, equaled it in a race. 

Should these two crack pacers come together next 
summer a great race can be looked for. Both have 
demonstrated that they are race horses of the highest 
type, and while Peter Stevens has had more experi- 
ence over the two-lap tracks, Ben Earl has shown 
that he can get around the short turns pretty well 
himself. 

A Harness Paper's View of an Interesting Subject. 

There has been a great hue and cry within the 
past few years about the rapidly declining use of the 
horse-drawn vehicle and its consequent disaster to 
the harness industry. We all know that this has 
been more particularly referred to in connection 
with the light or buggy harness, and some of the 
harness men are really in earnest about the buggy 
and its harness being relegated to the dump heap or 
to some other spot that is equally as profitable. 

To the man who gives up a fight without at least 
a struggle there can be no honors given. He dies 
sometimes within reach of victory, and still with a 
fainting heart that only cowards possess. Sometimes 
there is not even cause for the alarm that fills his 
mind, and he succumbs without even looking just 
a little ahead where still lies the land of promise. 
If it were true that the buggy industry was dead, 
then indeed might he shake his head and sigh that 
the good old days were no more. Maybe he thinks 
so, for he possibly has listened to the wail of his 
weak-kneed competitor, and to the awful clarion call 
of the man who is still trying to sell his automobiles. 

While the latter has been drowning out the voice 
of the buggy and harness men, telling the world that 
both of these industries are dead, there have been 
some of these men willing to listen to this tale of 
woe, and to convince themselves that it was in very 
truth a fact. Hearsay evidence is never considered 
in any court of law. Must it be taken for cold-blooded 
facts with any manufacturer or dealer in the harness 
industry? Would it not be better if we made a little 
personal investigation for ourselves and then be- 
came convinced that all that we hear is not true? 

These thoughts have been brought very forcibly 
to mind by an article that appeared in a recent issue 
of the Eastern Dealer, and we take a few excerpts 
from the same for the consideration of the harness 
men. They are just as applicable to the harness 
man, for every buggy made and sold means a like 
sale for harness and other equipment that the har- 
ness man sells. 

Here is the story: Consider the enormous number 
of automobiles owned and operated by persons who 
never owned a horse and buggy and probably never 
will, regardless of what may or may not be the future 
state of the automobile. 

Many people who now own automobiles never had 
any real love for the horse and still others had no 



way by which horses could be kept and cared for. 
Such persons would not be prospects for buggies 
even though business will not suffer because people 
of this class buy automobiles. 

Again, lots of fellows who used to shiver when 
they figured on the expense of maintaining a horse 
and buggy in town, now spend three times that sum 
in a half-way attempt to finance an automobile, and 
they will continue to do so for a time. 

There is an old saying, "The unceasing drop of 
water will wear a channel in the hardest stone," and 
there will come a time when the real figures of this 
automobile thing will have to be faced the same as 
we face other terms of business and household ex- 
pense. 

The farmer who deludes himself with the idea thai 
he can buy a cheap automobile and operate it with 
practically no cost to himself, will have a rude wak- 
ening. He may sliut his eyes to the expense for a 
while and say nothing — but he will keep up a terrible 
thinking. Sometimes he will figure it all out, ana 
when he does there will be less mileage with the gas 
wagon. When he takes his stub of a pencil and the 
back of an envelope, and in the light of his experi- 
ence does some figuring, the result will be startling. 

For instance, hei'e are some of the items on an in- 
vestment of $500 — and goodness knows $500 is a 
conservative sum to invest in an automobile: 



Interest r,t 6 per cent $ 30.00 

Insurance and license 25.00 

Deprecaition 100.00 

Tires and tubes 50.00 

5,000 miles at two cents 100.00 

Repairs 25.00 



Total $330.00 



Now, how many farmers stop to think that three 
hundred dollars is interest at 6 per cent on an in- 
vestment of five thousand dollars? How many fann- 
ers, when they buy a little five-hundred-dollar car, 
figure that they will have to use up the interest on 
a five thousand dollar investment to maintain it? 
And it is the easiest thing in the world to double the 
figures. Any of the big automobiles will do it. 

When the true facts get flashed on the screen of 
the human mind, by the projector of experience, the 
picture will be a revelation and an education. Now 
consider the sanity of the other side: 

A good buggy represents a small investment, con- 
sequently the depreciation amounts to little or noth- 
ing. The operating expenses in most cases is not 
direct, because the honses have to be maintained on 
the farm and the use of them for the buggy does not 
add materially to the cost of their up-keep. 

A bu-gy is a good, old, staid, reliable, every-day 
proposition. Winter and summer, whether the 
weather is hot or'cold, wet or dry, it can be depended 
upon — always and everywhere. 

The family buggy does not get out of adjustment. 
It has no carburetor to perplex, to hinder and excite 
you to profanity. It has no ignition to go on the 
bum, and no spark plug to refuse to spark. You 
don't have to "get out and get under." The only 
tools and equipment you ever need are a monkey- 
wrench and an oil can. The tires don't blow up. 
The wheels don't spin in the mud and burn up fifty 
dollars' worth of rubber in five minutes. And there 
isn't a day in the year you can't use the old, reliable 
buggy, regardless of weather or roads. 

Then think of the young and romantic. The auto- 
mobile has other handicaps. It requires the undivid- 
ed, two-handed attention of the driver. The influence 
of the moonlight is destroyed at 30 miles an hour; 
but the little sorrel horse "has a heart" — he gets the 
spirit of the occasion and loafs along the shady wood- 
land road Sunday afternoon without any attention 
from you at all. 

Ponder over this also: If any fellow thinks the 
buggy business is now confined to the country trade 
he has got another think coming, dropping into the 
parlance of the small boy. In the big cities like St. 
Louis, for instance, where the traffic department has 
actual statistics, you will find some eye-opening fig- 
ures. At a principal street intersection in St. Louis, 
323,869 vehicles of all kinds pas.sed, and 102,168 of 
them were horse-drawn, or about 32 per cent of the 
total. Only 52 per cent were passenger-automobiles, 
16 per cent trucks and freight vehicles. This, mind 
you, in the heart of a great city where the buggy 
is supposed to be as extinct as the dodo. — [Harness 
World. 

Advance of Mule Prices. 

McCarty Bros, of Clarence, Mo., are famous as 
mule buyers . Twenty-one years ago this firm began 
their operations by jiurchasing 18 head of four-year- 
old mules, for $33.33 per head. On last Monday they 
sold to Maher Bros. & Edwards, St. Louis, 98 mules 
at $212.50. These mules were no better than the 
ones they purchased twenty-one years ago when they 
began their most successful career of mule dealers. 
In addition to buying and selling mules and horses 
they are owners of and manage one of the largest 
farms in Shelby county. They are well-known buy- 
ers over the state and many fine horses and mules 
are brought to their farm and barns near Clarence 
to feed and prepare for the market. 

o 

The fastest quarter ever made by a trotter was 
trotted by Lou Dillon when she pulled her owner, 
C. K. G. Billings, in a wagon an accurately measured 
and timed quarter on the New York Speedway In 
:25%, which is a 1:43 gait. 



fi 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1917. 



SADDLE and SHOW HORSES I 

One of the features of the Denver horse show, 
January 22 to 27, will be the special high school 
exhibition of the celebrated mare. Belle Beach. This 
mare is conceded to be the peer of all present day 
high school animals and her appearance is always 
well received by a horse show audience. She is 
owned by UinUs L. Parrish of St. Louis and exhib- 
ited by Tom Bass, the veteran trainer of Mexico, Mo. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The announcement of E. D. Moore selling his hand- 
some saddle gelding, Greyhurst, to J. C. Hart, of 
Chicago, will not cause wonder to those who attended 
the recent International Horse Show. It was ex- 
pected that a big sale of this clever gelding would 
be made before the termination of the show, as he 
was the most popular three-gaited horse exhibited. 
He won every class he was shown in and the cham- 
pionship. The Eastern judges declared with some 
other color he would bring |10,000 in New York. 
Greyhurst is by Rex McDonald, and while Moore 
has been criticised by horsemen for giving him so 
much attention, his recent success in the show ring 
and sale proves the owner's judgment was the best. 
Greyhurst was also exhibited at the P.-P. I. E. and 
was a winner here. 

♦ ❖ ♦ 

The selection of Col. J. G. Lockridge, of Fayette, 
Mo., to serve as one of the judges at the coming 
Denver horse show, follows the long established cus- 
tom of the Denver management to get good "timber." 
1 his association has the reputation of having always 
had the fairest of judges and their show, coming 
early in the year, usually causes other associations, 
who noting the satisfaction the judges give at Den- 
ver, select the same men. In other words, when 
a man judges at Denver, one can count on seeing 
him in the same capacity in the middle west all 
during the season. Col. Lockridge is one of the best 
informed horsemen in Missouri, having been a prom- 
inent dealer many years and served as judge at 
prominent fairs and shows and presiding over many 
race meetings. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

E. D. Moore, of Columbia, Mo., reports the sale of 
the good three-gaited gray gelding, Greyhurst, to 
J. C. Hart, and the gelding. The Captain, to W. N. 
Rasmussen, both of Chicago. 

<S> <8> ❖ 

A carload of horses, including the stables of Tom 
Bass, of Mexico, and Blades & Holeman, of HoUiday, 
was shipped from Mexico this week to Denver, where 
the horses Avill be shown at the National Western 
Stock ShoA-. Included in the shipment were a pair 
of polo ponies, owned by Mr. Walter Hill, of St. Paul, 
thai will be re-consigned from Denver for Los Ange- 
les, Cal., where Mr. Hill will spend the latter part of 
this winter and will take part in the polo games at 
Pasadena. 

T. P. Harrison and John Yates, the well known 
Nortii Callaway county mule feeders, got $230 a head 
for 100 head of mules sold to Harry Gillen, of the 
Gillen-Heiman-Harper Mule Co. of National Stock 
Yards. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Arrangements have been made by Hans Berg, act- 
ing for the owner, Mr. William Wallace, of Philadel- 
phia, to place the stallion, Marshall Chief, in charge 
of Ed N. Hamilton, near Mexico, for the 1917 season. 
Mr. Hamilton now owns the good young stallion, All 
McDonald. 

o 

Noted Show Mare to Matron Ranks. 

The Breeder and Sportsman has been informed that 
H. C. Downing, of Des Moines, Iowa, owner of the 
celebrated show mare. Cigarette, contemplates send- 
ing her to the court of My Major Dare, Longview 
Farms, premier saddle stallion. Cigarette is by Bour- 
bon King, and two years ago was one of the most 
successful .«addie horses before the public. She was 
purchased by Mr. Downing at Mexico, Mo., last 
spring from the estate of the late George Barton, 
who was one of the best known sportsmen in the 
country. 

E. G. Bylander Appointed Secretary, Mo. State Fair. 

The most popular appointment the Missouri State 
Board of Agriculture ever made was at their recent 
meeting, when E. G. Bylander, for many years assist- 
ant secretary ,was made secretary of the state fair. 
Mr. Bylander is the best fitted man for this position 
available and his appointment will meet with the 
approval of live stock breeders all over the country. 
His appointment does not only mean success to the 
state fair and live stock interests generally, but that 
politics are lo be excluded from that institution. It 
was a matter of getting the best man regardless of 
his political affiliations. 

.'Ir. Bylander was appointed as a compromise be- 
tween the supporters of the present incumbent, E. T. 
Major, brother of the Governor, and those who op- 
posed him. Mr. Major has been secretary for two 
years. He probably will return to his home at 
Bowling Green, where he has real estate interests. 

Mr. Bylander is recognized by fair managers and 



secretaries overj'where as one of the most capable 
men in the business. He is a tireless worker, con- 
scientious in his dealings with the patrons and well 
informed on all subjects connected with the manage- 
ment ol a big fair. The 1917 fair, which will be the 
biggest in the history of the association, will be 
conducted the second week in October. The purses 
for every department have been materially advanced 
and good entry lists in all events are expected. It 
is probable that the $2500 stake for gaited horses will 
be discontinued unless a concerted effort on the part 
of saddle horse men is made. 

The association is willing to give the money and 
realizes this stake is the best drawing card of their 
fair; however, it has been hard to get a sufficient 
number of entries to fill the event, and saddle horse 
breeders must show some interest if it is to continue. 

Advertising Brings Quick Results. 

"My little want ad in your paper certainly brought 
results," writes Wm. Kuhlmann, of Winona, Minn. 
He adds: "So far, only a short time since it ap- 
peared I have had two inquiries from Kentucky; 
two from Missouri; one from Colorado and one from 
Virginia." 




GOLDEN KING, recently sold to J. A. P. Ramsdell 
by George Ford Morris, of Fordacre Farm, Eaton- 
town, N. J. 

J. A. P. Ramsdell, of Powelton Farm, Newburg, 
N. Y.. has lost by death the noted saddle stallion 
Korosco, sire of many blue ribbon winners at East- 
ern shows, and has replaced him with Golden King, 
a widely known sire that was formerly in the stud 
at Adirondack Farms, Glens Falls. N. Y. The new- 
horse is a chestnut, about 15.2 hands high, and is 
regarded as one of the handsomest of living saddle 
stallions. His breeding shows the close relationship 
between the Kentucky saddle horse and the trotter, 
his sire, Wilson's King, having been a son of the reg- 
istered trotter and saddle horse Harrison Chief, by 
Clark Chief ,son of Mambrino Chief, the sire of Lady 
Thorn 2:181,4. Golden King's dam, Indian Queen, 
was by Wyatt's Red Cloud, a registered saddle horse 
by the registered trotting horse and saddle horse 
Indian Chief, son of Blood's Black Hawk, by Hill's 
Vermont Black Haw^k, the sire of Ethan Allen 2:25i^. 
Both Wyatt's Red Cloud and Wilson's King were out 
of the same mare, a daughter of the trotting horse 
Parsons' Abdallah, by Alexander's Abdallah, the sire 
of Goldsmith Maid 2:14. The granddam of Golden 
King was by Governor Wilkes, son of George Wilkes 
2:22, and Daisy Burns, by Indian Chief, sire of Wy- 
att's Red Cloud. 

o 

A "Bred-in-the-Bone" Record Breaker. 

Irene's Cherry 285828 has earned the title of 
"World's Champion Senior Two-Year-Old Jersey." 
She went on test at two years and eleven months of 
age. and in the ensuing ;!G5 days produced 12,567.7 
pounds of milk, containing 749.87 pounds of fat. This 
means 882. 2 pounds of 85 per cent butter and easily 
exceeds the record which was made by Lad's Lady 
Riotress Irene, the former champion. 

The new champion is a direct descendant of Lo- 
retta D. and Ida Marigold. It will be remembered 
that, Ida Marigold was the "best cow of any breed" 
in the cheese test at the World's Columbian Exposi- 
tions at Chicago and St. Louis, and Loretta D. was 
pronounced "best cow of any breed" in the tests 
for "economic production of butter-fat and butter" 
and "economic production of milk for all purposes 
of dairying" at the St. Louis Exposition. 

It is interesting to note that Irene's Cherry is the 
first cow to go on official te.U at Few acres Farm, 
located at Wauwatosa, Wis., wliere is located one of 
the greatest county agricultural schools in America. 
She was bred by Clark & Emery of New York, and 
sold to Mr. F. D. Underwood, her present owner, be- 
fore she was two years of age. 

* ❖ <» 

D'llcara. one of the best bred of all the Sidney 
Dillons, will stand for service at Pleasanton Driving 
Park this year. His fee will be $50 to insure. 

That grandly bred stallion, Marse Abe, son of the 
great Yankee and the mare Halo by St. Blaise, will 
be in service at Pleasanton this season. Fee $50. 
Read the advertisement for further particulars. 



Proposed Change in Thoroughbred Registration. 

By an amendment to The Jockey Club's registra- 
tion rules it is proposed to abolish the so-called "five 
cross" rule in the registration of thoroughbreds. The 
present rules provide that "only those horses are 
eligible for registrj' which have either five uncontam- 
inated thoroughbred crosses or which authentically 
trace through or to animals recorded in the first six 
volumes of the American Stud Book, or in a recog- 
nized stud book of another country." The new rule 
says: — 

"Only those horses are eligible for registry which 
authentically trace, in all of their lines, to animals 
recorded in the American Stud Book or in a recog- 
nized stud book of another country." 

An explanatory note says: "It is deemed essen- 
tial to omit the five cross rule, as it is misconstrued 
by the general public and leads them to believe that 
a thoroughbred can be made to order by five top 
crosses." 

In the first seven volumes of the American Stud 
Book, compiled by its founder, Colonel Sanders D. 
Bruce, he accepted as thoroughbred any horse hav- 
ing five top crosses of registered blood, and as a 
matter of fact registered many that could not qualify 
under this rule. In the last volumes compiled by 
him the short bred horses were in an appendix, where 
he admitted anything having two crosses or more. 
When the Jockey Club came into possession of the 
Stud Book, in 1898, this appendix was abolished, and 
horses were thereafter registered in the body of the 
book only when they could show the requisite five 
crosses or traced in all lines to animals in previous 
volumes of the book. Now^ it is proposed to close the 
doors to any more "cold" blood, however remote, and 
follow the example of the English authorities by 
limiting registration strictly to the offspring of reg- 
istered sires and dams. And since horses must be 
registered before they can start on Jockey Club 
tracks the races of the future may be for the first 
time in this country exclusively for thoroughbreds. 
o 

Two new rules have been proposed by the Ken- 
tucky State Racing Commission. The first is to the 
effect that at race meetings at Louisville and Latonia 
the average amount of money shall be $800 cash and 
there shall be no race given to which is added less 
than $600. At Lexington the average is fixed at $600 
and the minimum at $500. No stake, except selling 
stakes, shall have less than $2,000 added at Louis- 
ville and Latonia and $1,000 at Lexington. 

The other rule reads: "In any race that fails to 
fill and is declared off, the names of all horses that 
were entered shall be publicly posted in the secre- 
tary's office not later than 1 o'clock p. m. on the day 
of which it was to be run." 

A resolution to give premiums at County fairs for 
weanlings, sired by thoroughbred stallions belonging 
to the Kentucky Breeding Bureau, which is fostered 
by the State Racing Commission by pro-rata sub- 
scriptions from race tracks of the state, was adopted, 
the resolution having been the outgrowth of a sug- 
gestion made by James P. Ross, superintendent of 
the Lexington track. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

John E. Madden has made an important sale of 
twenty-one yearlings to Hal Price Headley and Mr. 
Headley has taken over with the lot their engage- 
ments in the Futurity of 1918, for which they are 
eligible. Each is by Star Shoot and the colts are 
from Bold Girl, Busy Maid, Blue Grass, Courtplaster, 
Doria, Dorothy Hampton, Flora Pomona, Mamie 
Worth, Miss Granville, Miss Kearney and Raglan. 
The fillies are from Decoy, Dolly Higgins, Fair Lou- 
ise, Janeta, Lady Tarantella, Little Buttercup, Lady 
Schorr, Pastorella, Pedigree and Sweet Majoram. 
The Courtplaster colt is a twin. 

<S> ❖ <S> 

Trampfast (2) 2:12»4 and The Exponent 2:11% 
gained credit with twenty-six new performers in 
1916 and when official returns are announced the 
number will, in all probability, be increased. 

Anti-Cattle Rustling Bill. 

An anti-cattle rustling bill will be introduced in 
the legislature next week by Senator E. S. Rigdon of 
San Lui= Obispo as a means of limiting depredations 
and thefts committed by cattle thieves. Rigdon's 
m(>asure provides for a system of inspection of hides 
and cattle which would establish ownership at the 
time of sale. The measure was drafted in the inter- 
est of rhe Central Stockmen's association of Califor- 
nia. The cost of Inspection will be borne by the 
cattlemen themselves. 

<$><«><$> 
Tagus Ranch Sells Herd. 

Tulare, Jan. 13.— The Tagus ranch, north of Tulare, 
today closed a deal for the sale of 900 head of black 
Polled Angus beef cattle for approximately $100,000 
to a Los Angeles packing company. It is the largest 
cattle deal that has been made here in years. The 
cattle are to be fattened on cottonseed meal at the 
Tagus ranch until delivery to the packing company, 
which will be extended over the time between now 
and nex* May. The Tagus ranch was stocked with 
black Polled Angus cattle more than two years ago, 
wh«n the stock was imported from Texas. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Star Winter, that a few years ago won a lot of 
money in the Grand Circuit and took a third-heat 
record of 2:05, has been sold for a show horse. 

♦ ❖ ♦ 

A $20,000 offer was refused for Emma Magowan. 



Saturday, January 20, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Notes and News 



Yes; there'll be a California circuit. 

<» <$> <^ 

There will be at least ten meetings between Aug- 
ust 1st and October 6th. 

<?> ^ ^ 

The old weight rule has been done away with by 
the new rules of the A. T. A. and N. T. A. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The substitution of "shall" in the place of "may" 
is quite noticeable in the new rules of the N. T. A. 

^ 

Ted Bunch and the pacer Zonibrino 2: 06 ',4 made 
a good looking picture for the title page of the Horse 
Review last week. 

<S> <S> <S> 

Harry Brusie, of Hartford, Conn., won $13,785 in 
purses racing on half mile tracks in 1916. 

<S> <?> 

There is to be two weeks' racing on the Youngs- 
town, Ohio, half mile track from June 26th to July 
6th this year, and the purses will range from $500 to 
$2500. 

« <$> ♦ 

It is stated on good authority that the pari nuituel 
bill prepared by the Golden Gate Thoroughbred As- 
sociation will not be introduced at this session of 
the California legislature. 

If your horse that you value so highly dies and 
there is no insurance money to collect you will feel 
his loss a great deal more than if you had a policy 
on him in The Two Hartfords. 

«>.$><$> 

The thoroughbred stallion Joe Carey, sire of many 
good winners, and himself a high class race horse, 
will stand for public service at Pleasanton this sea- 
son, fee $50. See advertisement for tabulated pedi- 
gree. ■ 

<S> ❖ «^ 

An ideal circuit of harness racing would start at 
Pleasanton and proceed in the following order: Pet- 
aluma. Santa Rosa, Dixon, Woodland, MaiTsville, 
State Fair, Fresno, Hanford, Bakersfield, Riverside, 
Ventura, Los Angeles, Phoenix. 

<S> <S> «> 

Mr. J. J. Kadderly of Portland, Oregon, recently 
sold his mare Tangerine by Bonnie Tangent and pur- 
chased a five-year-old Hal B. pacing gelding. Mr. 
Kadderly is much pleased with his Hal B. pacer and 
says this horse acts like an "Isser." 

^ <$> ^ 

John Kirkland is training a very fast pacer in 
the roan mare Helen Mistletoe by Hal B. This mare 
trialed an easy mile in 2:08 last fall for Kirkland and 
looked like an easy 2:05 pacer . Mr. Kirkland is 
wintering at Albany, Oregon. 

♦ >«> ♦ 

When the Blackhawk Stock Ranch gets its new 
ciuarters at the foot of Mount Diablo all fitted up, it 
will be the finest draft horse ranch in California. 
There are some excellent young sires for sale at the 
ranch now at Burlingame. See the advertisement. 
^ <$> <$> 

It is rumored that Thos. Murphy will campaign the 
pacer Zombrino 2:061/4 owned by Dr. Belt of Phoe- 
nix, Arizona, over the big ring next year. Murphy 
will have a hard time beating Ted Bunch's record of 
18 wins out of 21 starts with this horse in 1916. 
<S> ^ <J> 

Mr. J. S. Waddell, Seci-etary of the California Fair 
and Racing Association, has made the office of the 
Breeder and Sportsman his headquarters and asks 
that all communications be addressed him in San 
Francisco, care of this office, 366 Pacific Building, 
San Francisco. 

<S> * ❖ 

Harry J. S. 2: 07 14, the pony trotter that forced 
Al Mack out in 2:08% and 2:09»^ over the half mile 
track at Goshen last summer, is now credited with 
32 winning races and earnings of $17,130. He has 
started 58 times in the last six years and has won a 
part of the purse in all but three of his races. 
<S> * ❖ 

The letter from Mr. M. L. Woy, of Fresno, to the 
convention called to arrange a circuit of harness 
racing, in which he suggested organization and 
pledged $50 to the cause, did much to start the ball 
rolling at the convention which resulted in the or- 
ganization of the California Fair and Racing Asso- 
ciation. And when C. A. Durfeo heard the letter 
read he remarked, "Woy is all right and I'll subscribe 
to that cause myself." And he did. 

L. L. Cannon of Penn Grove, Sonoma county, is 
breeding dual-purpose cattle on an extensive scale 
and finds them highly profitable. Mr. Cannon first 
started with Jerseys. He crossed them with Short- 
horns and is mating that cross to pure bred Holstein 
bulls. He says his section of the country requires 
ruggedness and that these crosses produce this type 
as well as profitable dairy and beef cattle. Mr. Can- 
non says the fair at Santa Rosa will give a big stock 
show again this year and expects the herds of ad- 
joining counties as well as their own. Mr. Cannon 
was elected president of the California Fair and Rac- 
ing Association last Tuesday. 



Charley Silva. owner of the Woodland Stock Farm, 
reports that the half mile track there is finished. 
It is 60 feet wide and is located inside the old mile 
track, with the exception of the home stretch which 
is the same for both tracks. The turns are well 
thrown up and as soon as the soil settles it will be 
as fast a two-lap ring as there is in the country. 
<§><»<$> 

Report has it that Peter the Great 2:07i^, the 
greatest of all sires, is to remain in Kentucky for 
another season. The purchase of so many horses 
recently by Mr. Fletcher, principally brood mares, 
gave rise to the belief that the son of Pilot Medium 
and Santos would be removed to the splendid Indiana 
farm that has been fitted up by Mr. Fletcher. 
<S> <S> <8> 

Following the fashion set by C. K. G. Billings 
about ten years ago, more and more men who ride 
for exercise in Central Park, New York, are using 
fast trotting horses under saddle. No one who has 
seen Mr. Billings mounted on the champion trotter 
Uhlan 1:58, can doubt the exhilaration the fast trot- 
ting saddle horse affords to a good rider when going 
a 2:20 clip on the bridle paths, while for exercise 
there is admittedly no other saddle gait like the trot. 
4> <$> <S> 

Lou Dillon 1:58*4, the fastest of trotting mares, 
gave birth on Thursday, January 11th, to a filly by 
Tho Harvester 2:01, holder of the world's record for 
trotting stallions until last year. The royally bred 
youngster was foaled at C. K. G. Billings' Curies 
Neck Farm on the James river, near Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. Lou Dillon was barren in 1915, after having 
produced Lou Billings 2:08%, Expressive Lou 2:08V4,, 
Ben Billings 2:07 and Mack Dillon 2:22i4. 

It behooves eveiy harness horse owner, trainer 
and driver to get a copy of the new rules as soon as 
they are printed and read them over carefully before 
he enters or starts to race horses this year. The 
rules are now identical for both American and Na- 
tional tracks, and there are a number of important 
changes. Every horse must now be entered in the 
name of its owner or duly authorized agent, and 
every stable name must be registered. The new rules 
will be ready in pamphlet form very soon. 

My Irene S. (2) 2:28%, great broodmare by Peti- 
gru 2:101/^;, and dam of Esperanza 2:07i/4, Zorene 
2:1014, Carl (3) 2:14'^ and two or three othei-s, 
brought $775 and was bought for Mr. C. K. G. Bil- 
lings, owner of Curies Neck Farm, Virginia, at the 
Chicago Sale last month. She was stinted to Carlo- 
kin in 1010 and W. G. Durfee, who consigned her to 
the sale, believes her to be in foal. However she 
did not look to be with foal on the day of the sale 
and was knocked down for the amount named. 
Palmer L. Clark, president of the Chicago Sales 
Company, says that My Irene S. would have brought 
$2500 had she shown to a certainty that she was 
carrying a foal. 

❖ ❖ ❖ 

One of the prominent rancher-stockmen of Cali- 
fornia, who attended the meeting of fair, managers 
and secretaries in San Francisco this week, was 
J. W. Jennings, of Tehachapi, Kern county. Mr. Jen- 
nings is one of the directors of the Kern county fair 
at Bakersfield and represented that association at 
the meeting. He says the association will offer lib- 
eral prizes for every class of pure bred stock this 
year. Their 1916 fair cleared $3,000 and it was their 
first meeting. Several hundred head of stock was 
exhibited and a big race meeting held. Mr. Jennings 
is the manager of the Ramina Ranch, and stock from 
his ranch won 21 prizes "at last year's fair. They 
have a magnificent band of Percheron and Shire 
horses, which are proving profitable, and a herd of 
pure bred Jersey cattle comprising 105 head. He is 
preparing 30 head of stock for the 1917 fairs of that 
section of California. 

^ <S> ♦ 

Rearing an orphan colt is a tedious task and re- 
quires patience, attention to details and cleanliness. 
Cow's milk is the logical substitution for mares' 
milk, but as it is lower in per cent of protein, fat 
and ash than mare's milk and higher in per cent of 
water and milk sugar, allowance must be mad(> for 
this. Add enough warm water to a tablespoonful of 
sugar — preferably white sugar — to dissolve it and 
then add from three to five tablespoonfuls of lime 
water and enough milk to make a pint. Feed one- 
fourth of this mixture every hour for a few days, 
gradually lengthening the intervals between feeding 
and increasing the amount given at a feed as the 
colt grows older. It is important to warm the mix- 
ture to body temperature before feeding. At first, 
especially, a bottle and nipple probably will be found 
the cheapest and most satisfactory means of induc- 
ing the colt to take the milk. If the colt scours, cut 
down on the amount of milk and give two to four 
ounces of a mixture of two parts of castor oil to one 
part of sweet oil. At three or four weeks old the 
sugar in the milk may be discontinued and at three 
months the colt should be on a ration of all the 
sweet milk it will drink three times daily. As soon 
as possible teach the young colt to eat grain and 
alfalfa and allow it access to grass. Crushed oats 
and a little bran make the best grain feed, but if 
these are not available one may substitute crushed 
com and bran in equal part.s by bulk with a little 
linseed meal. A colt should be given opportunity to 
nibble alfalfa from the very beginning so as to make 
a lot of strong growth. 



Writing from Vienna, Austria, on October 25th, Ira 
Ryerson has informed his friends in Goshen that he 
won eighty races in 1916, with two weeks more re- 
maining before the close of the campaign. 

<S> <8> «> 

"All horses must be entered in the names of their 
bona fide owners, and must so appear in the pub- 
lished lists of entries," is the wording of a new pro- 
vision in the turf code, but owners may still keep 
their names out of print by using a stable name, 
which must be duly registered. 

«><$><& 

The racing string of Capt. David Shaw, of Cleve- 
land, for the coming season will consist of Peter Mc 
2:03 Vi, who will be raced through the Grand Circuit; 
Miss Rejected 2:05V^; Prince Loree, matinee 2:13V^; 
Miss Eleata (3) by Peter the Great 2:07',4, dam 
Eleata 2:08V4 by Dexter Prince, and her four-year- 
old sister, Eleata the Great. 

<J> ■«> ^ 

The New York Herald of last Sunday said that 
II. D. Beavers, who handles the highest class of Ohio 
drafters, was on the market for the third time this 
winter on January 8th. He had a grand lot of Per- 
cheron and Belgian geldings, some of which weighed 
close to a ton. Brewers, contractors and coal dealers 
got the most of them, at prices ranging up to $425 
for singles and $825 for teams. 

<?> <8> * 

The first important special sale of show, harness 
and saddle horses held this year is announced in 
New York by Miss Constance Vauclain, of Philadel- 
phia, who will dispose of twelve noted prize winners 
from Broadlawn Farms. The horses will be shipped 
to New York and the sale will take place on the 
afternoon of Wednesday, January 31. In the con- 
signment are Lady Dilham and Elegant Dilham, eas- 
ily the most successful pair of bantam hackney high 
steppers ever seen at American horse shows. Miss 
Vauclain paid $4,800 for the pair at auction less than 
a year ago, and exhibited them with much success 
at the summer shows, winning twenty-nine first 
prizes in single and double harness. 

o 

BILLINGS MAY MOVE TO CALIFORNIA. 



Owner of The Harvester 2:01, Lou Dillon 1:58^2, 
Uhlan 1:58 and William 1:581/2 Likes This State. 



Surprising news came from New York last night, 
says Gtiy T. Rockwell of the Cleveland Plaindealer 
of Jan. 14th, that C. K. G. Billings, inillionaire horse 
fancier, has no further use for Curies Neck Farm, 
his 5,2i50-acre stock farm on the James river, Rich- 
mond, Va., which he bought for years ago for 
$1,000,000. 

He is willing to part with the historic property 
for $700,000 or even less. Ten days ago Mr. Billings 
sold for loss than its value Tryon Hall, his country 
estate at the north end of Manhattan Island, to John 
D. Rockefeller Jr., as a site for a public park, and a 
few days later he gave a large plot of Chicago real 
estate as a site for a medical research laboratory 
such as Mr. Rockefeller has established in this city. 

In the absence of definite information the signifi- 
cance of these real estate deals was said today to 
be that Mr. Billings is through with the east and 
that he plans to make his permanent home in Cali- 
fornia, and he is now at Santa Barbara where he has 
spent several winters. 

Mr. Billings purchased the farm four years ago 
and immediately comm(>nced to modernize it. He 
has spent thousands of dollars in razing old build- 
ings, erecting new ones and improving the estate. 
In addition, he has invested heavily in brood mares, 
owning at present fifty or more carefully selected 
matrons who are bred in the deepest of purple. 

The farm consists of 5,250 acres of useful land, 
a liberal share of which is marshy and is used as a 
game pres(>rve. Quail, snipe, teal, grouse, wild tur- 
keys, ducks, geese and various other birds are to be 
found in abundance, while it is a common sight to 
see deer grazing with the brood mares. 

There is a mile training track on the place, over 
which William is being trained this winter, while 
all told there is fifty miles of road on the farm for 
horse and auto. 

Buildings are numerous at Curies Neck. In addi- 
tion to the mansion, which is a roomy brick house 
of Colonial design, each department head has his own 
house. Among these is the head fanner, assistant 
farmer, the dairyman, the game warden, the mechan- 
ician. Then there is the boarding house, the pump 
house, etc. 

There are numerous buildings tor horses, too. 
There is a training barn, 470 by 60, that has a double 
row of box stalls down tlie center and each stall is 
12 by 14. Around the stalls is a track (hat is used 
for jogging horses on inclement days. This barn is 
larger than the mammoth structure at North Ran- 
dall, in which ninety-six horses may be accommo- 
dated. 

There is a new barn for colts, a new barn for brood 
mares, a saddle horse barn, a stallion barn, several 
barns for hay, as well as several old barns still used 
for housing mares and colts. 

The entrance to the farm is over a stone bridge 
that cost $50,000. 

Ctirler, Neck is the home of Lou Dillon 1:58^; 
The Harvester 2:01; Uhlan 1:58, and William 1:58V4, 
all champions. The brood mares purchased upon 
advice of Ed Tipton and Doc Tanner, graze in pas- 
tures of 150 acres each, and have water to drink from 
artesian wells, some of which are 700 feet deep. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1917. 



ROD. GUN AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY FISHER HUNT ! 



a 

U. S. Field Trials. — Januarj' 1, 1917, marked the 
opening date of the annual trials of the United States 
Field Trial Club, at Grand Junction, Tenn., the his- 
toric old town where history has been written on the 
scrolls of the bird dog records during the past forty 
or more years. 

In the present trials there were twenty-six starters 
in the Derby and thirty-one in the All-Age. It is not 
a record-breaking mark, it is true, but nevertheless 
it is a healthy average and about on a par with the 
other important clubs of the season. 

Mary Montrose proved to be the winner of the 
Derby and in this stake she showed her superiority 
over the rest of the field in a decisive manner. Mary 
ran two brilliant heats. She proved in this stake 
that she can handle game as perfectly as an All-Age 
dog, that she is a good ground-worker and that she 
has the stamina. On the morning when she ran her 
one-hour heat, which is one of the stipulations in the 
United States Derby that winners of first and second 
must go this length of time, the ground was soggy 
from the heavy rains of the night before. 

Mary Montrose is a very handsome white and liver 
pointer bitch, by Comanche Frank, out of Lorna 
Doone, and one of the famous William Ziegler string, 
which were picked up early in the season by Bob 
Armstrong for J. J. Graham of Syosset, Long Island, 
N. Y. Bob Armstrong handled the bitch in this stake, 
as he has been doing mose of the season, and he 
never did a better piece of work than he did at 
Grand Junction. 

The second series and winners were: — Mary Mont- 
rose with Brightfields Freckles; Comanche Rap with 
Concho Dick; Miss Peg with Count Kinsman; Royal 
Flush with Master Peg. 

Result: — 1st, Mary Montrose. 2d, Concho Dick. 
3d, Master Peg. 

The winner of the All-Age Stake was Joe Muncie 
and second went to Lewis C. Morris. This is a case 
of history repeating itself, for a year ago these two 
dogs were placed the same way in the United States 
trials. Reams about Joe Muncie have been written 
during the three years he has been before the public 
and to say much more now would be merely a reitera- 
tion of his good qualities and an accentuation of his 
faults. Joe is a wide-going, indefatigable ground 
worker, and withal a dog with o nose, for there are 
few days which find more birds than does Joe. But 
he is not intense on his game. It is well known by 
this time that he is now the property of Benjamin 
Weil of Ale.xandria, La., and that he has been in 
Avent's string since last February. 

Lewis C. Morris, grand pointer that he is, did not 
seem like the same Lewis of a year ago. Lewis was 
clearly not himself and under the conditions could 
not go higher in the slake. Gilchrist, however, has 
full confidence in the dog and feels assured that by 
the time the two championship stakes are run the 
dog will be himself again. 

Square Edges, the pointer bitch which Herbert 
Fishel campaigned in the Derbys of two years ago 
so successfully, was placed third. 

The second series and results were: — Lewis C. 
Morris with Joe Muncie; Candy Kid with Square 
Edges. 

Result — 1st, Joe Muncie. 2d, Lewis C. Morris. 3d, 
Square Edges. 

QG 

Ducks vs. War Again. — Sacramento, Cal— The rice 
growers of the Sacramento valley have declared war 
on ducks and other feathered animals that virtually 
unmolested have lived well and luxuriantly on the 
growing rice crops. They will seek to have the legis- 
lature enact a law which will permit them to kill, 
in and out of season, all wild fowls in their territory. 

Stories of depredations committed by ducks in the 
rice fields have been related to the legislators by 
representatives of the growers and they obtained a 
sympathetic hearing from Senator Herbert W. Slater 
of Santa Rosa, chairman of the Fish and Game Com- 
mission committee. 

At present the farmers are liable to arrest and 
punishment under the laws of the Fish and Game 
Commission should they attempt to protect their 
property by shooting game birds out of season. Either 
the ducks and birds must go or a budding industry 
perish, so the growers have told the legislators. They 
will therefore ask that a protective measure be 
passed in their interest. 

% 

California Coursing Club. — Sacramento, Cal. — San 
Pablo Girl was the winner of the 16 dog San Fran- 
cisco stake, and Irish Linnet was the winner of the 
12 dog Oakland stake at the first coursing meet of 
the season of the California Coursing Club of San 
Francisco, held at Franklin on Sunday. The San 
Francisco stake carried a ?50 first price and the Oak- 
land stake carried a |40 prize for the first place. 

Oakland was the runner-up in the San Francisco 
stake, while Jim Long ran second in the Oakland 
stake. 

Many San Francisco, Oakland, Richmond and Sac- 



ramento sportsmen were on hand to witness the meet 
in spite of the cold weather . The officers of the 
California club are satisfied with the first meet, and 
are contemplating another meet at Franklin in the 
near future. 

The following are the results in the first tie in the 
San Francisco stake: San Pablo Girl beat Oakland 
Beauty, Hellover Swell beat Sure Mike, Expensive 
Board beat Riley's Tralee, Napa Jack beat Sad Sam, 
Oakland Beau beat Gaudy, Oakland Dandy beat 
fashion Clothes, Isleton beat Majule, and Queenie 
beat Granaile. 

In the second tie San Pablo Girl beat Hellover 
Swell, Expensive Board beat Napa Jack, Oakland 
Beau be it Oakland Dandy, and Isleton beat Queenie. 
In the third tie San Pablo Girl beat Expensive Board 
and Oakland Beau beat Isleton. Oakland Beau was 
winded at the end of the third tie, so San Pablo Girl 
was declared the winner. 

In the first tie of the Oakland stake Steam Trawler 
beat Louie's Best, Oakland Girl beat the Fretter, 
Irish Linnet beat Los Molinos, Young Blade beat 
Alfred M., Jim Long beat Mark West, and Pride of 
Richmond beat White Sox. 

In the second tie Steam Trawler beat Oakland 
Girl, Irish Linnet beat Young Blackie and Jim Long 
beat Pride of Richmond. 

In the third tie Irish Linnet beat Steam Trawler, 
and Jim Ijong ran a baye. Irish Linnet had little 
difficulty in beating Jim Long in the final dash. 

% 

Portland Club. — Mrs. Ada Schilling, after a much- 
needed rest, went out to Everding Park January 7th 
and returned with the high average of the regular 
weekly shoot. Her score was 100 per cent, and the 
next in line was her husband, C. J. Schilling, and 
James E. Reid, both professionals, and each with a 
mark of 96 per cent. Twenty-two contestants were 
at the grounds and enjoyed themselves. 

Frank M. Templeton, winner of the main event in 
the Pacific Coast handicap last year, has issued a 
challenge for the beautiful W. C. Bristol trophy for 
20-gauge guns now held by Henry R. Everding, the 
secretary-treasurer of the club. Mr. Everding so far 
has been aHe to defend it against all comers, and he 
will have a chance to show his superiority over Mr. 
Templeton. The provision of the challenge is that 
all contestants must shoot a 20-gauge gun. 

The cup must be defended and won five times be- 
fore it becomes the permanent property of any shoot- 
ed. The competition is open to other than members 
of the Portland Gun Club, and plenty of 20-gauge 
guns are kept at the clubhouse for the use of pat- 
rons. Fred E. Butler, said to be one of the best 20- 
gaugers of the Lewiston, Idaho, Gun Club, will make 
a special trip to Portland to contest for the cup. The 
event will be for 25 birds and will be shot following 
the Templeton match. 

Following are the scores: E. H. Keller 80, Mrs. 
Ada Schilling 100, Carl J. Schilling (professional) 
96, C. Meach 56, O. J. Clossett 64, A. W. Strowger 80, 
James K. Simpson 76, C. L. Diven 76, A. L. Zachris- 
son 88, A. Ericksou 80, James P. Bull and E. B. Mor- 
ris, both professionals and using 20-gauge guns, 68; 
B. E. Long 68, W. C. Bristol (20-gauge gun) 72, Jas. 
E. Reid (profes.sional) 95, J. S. Crane 64, Miss Gladys 
Reid 84, Frank M. Templeton 88, Henry R. Everding 
84, L. L. Mulit 76, E. L. Clark 72, and Al Seguin 68. 

QG 

Starts Fox Ranch — About a mile south of Kettleby, 
Ont., a fox ranch has been started by Mr. Walls. 
He is associated with other men experienced in the 
raising of foxes for fur. They have at present 19 
fine specimens ranging from black, silver and cross 
to the ordinary red species. The fancy animals were 
secured in the far north from Indians, and are of 
great value. 

These animals are valued by the owners at ten 
thousand dollars. They are confined in double wire 
pens, the top and bottoms also being of wire netting. 
Around the pens containing the matched mates ars 
also two high wire screen fences to prevent escape 
or molestation. So far the Walls' have not lost a 
single fox and they are all healthy and very lively. 
With good luck there will be a big increase in April 
and May. 

00 

Seal Herds Increase. — The seal herds on the Pribi- 
lif Islands in Behring Sea have increased so rapidly 
since killing of the bur-bearing animals was prohib- 
ited that the Government will begin to kill them 
regularly next year, according to a statement made 
by H. J. Christoffer, assistant agent for the United 
States Bureau of Fisheries, on his return from an 
inspection trip to the islands. Mr. Christoffer made 
the trip on the steamer Elihu Thomson, which left 
September 5th with winter supplies for the islands. 
The Thomson brought back 7,000 skins which were 
taken from seals killed to supply food for the natives 
on the islands. The skins will be shipped to St. 
Louis, where the Government will sell them at auc- 
tion. 



GAME REFUGES FOR CALIFORNIA. 



Expert Locates Chain of Sanctuaries From Mexican 
Border to Oregon. 



Wild game will have a chance in California when 
the series of game refuges now being located by 
Harold C. Bryant for the State Fish and Game Com- 
mission, is approved by the Legislature. A fair 
chance, is the way sportsmen put it — a chance for 
big game to rear young unmolested by any gang of 
pot hunters who possess the price of an automatic 
rifle. 

And just how much chance the men who are plan- 
ning these sanctuaries Intend to give wild game is 
here told for the first time. Forest rangers. State 
deputies and resident mountaineers have co-operated 
with the State officials and have furnished field data 
which is now being plotted by Brjant. 

The scheme is to locate a series of the refuges 
extending in two chains, from the Mexican border 
to Oregon along the coast; the other through the 
Nevada Sierra mountain. These refuges are pro- 
posed : 

San Diego county — A Laguna mountain refuge, 36 
miles from San Diego, near the eastern boundary of 
the National Forest, 51,840 acres. 

Sespee river, Santa Barbara county — The largest 
part of the watershed of the Upper Sespee, 125,440 
acres. 

Sisquoc river, near the headwaters — 39,680 acres 
reserved. Sisquoc is a tributary to the Santa Maria. 

In the Sierra Nevada mountains, the chain begins 
with a refuge near the head of the South Fork of the 
Kern river. 

On the Kings river a preserve of 33,400 acres is to 
be set aside. The site is not yet fixed. 

Northerly, two national parks, the Sequoia and 
Yosemite, form two links of the chain. The next 
refuge is in eastern Amador county, where 57,600 
acres will be set aside on Panther creek. 

American river, between the Rubicon and Middle 
Fork of the American, 64,000 acres will be reserved. 

Feather river — That region north of Hartman bar 
to be reserved. 

Tehama county — The headwaters of Mill creek and 
a part of the Deer creek watershed. Size is not de- 
termined. 

Lassen county — Eagle lake, section on west shore, 
amounting to 47,580 acres, to be set aside. 

Modoc county — Pine creek headwaters to he made 
a refuge, amounting to 57,000 acres in the lava beds. 

McCloud river — Southeast of Castella, between the 
Sacramento and McCloud, 69,000 acres. 

Klamath river, west of Gottville, about twelve 
miles, a tract of 8960 acres. 

Mendocino county — Section in Eastern Mendocino 
and Western Lake, in vicinity of Hull mountain, of 
37,00 Oacres. 

Monterey county — Headwaters of the Arroyo Seco. 

Hunting only will be forbidden in these areas. 
Fishing and the bearing of arms will not be stopped, 
and is not stopped in the game refuges which now 
exist. At present permits are issued for the hunting 
of predatory animals. This custom will be continued 
if the new refuges are accepted, according to Bryant. 

Sportsmen have one real objection to the establish- 
ment of these refuges, and it has been voiced by 
many of those who have studied the game conserva- 
tion problem. That is, how to make it possible for 
a hunter to transport game, not killed in the refuge, 
through the refuge. In those protected areas now 
existing the law declares that "possession" of game 
is a violation of the law. • 

The hunter may ask, and with some force, how am 
I to get my game home when a trail runs through 
the refuge? 

To which Bryant makes reply: 

"We hope eventually to establish a tagging system. 
A deputy in each refuge would tag all game, killed 
outside and brought to him. This scheme would al- 
low hunters to travel through the areas without 
delay. 

"We have had little trouble of this kind in the re- 
serves now established, although they are so situated 
as to discommode hunters much more than the new 
ones we propose." 

00 

New Angling Licenses — The new angling licenses 
of 1917, due January 1st, have been received by the 
Fish and Game Commission and are being distrib- 
uted among its resale agents. The new licenses are 
both handsome and instructive, printed in blue, with 
a fine engraving of the Mt. Whitney hatchery, just 
completed, the most substantial improvement it has 
ever been possible to erect for fish and game in the 
south. The solid architecture and handsome appear- 
ance of this imposing pile which harmonizes so per- 
fectly with the rugged grandeur of the Sierras is well 
shown. 

AW who fish from the surf, or troll for yellowtail, 
albacore, barracuda, bass, bonita, tuna or other game 
fishes as specified, require license and a lively de- 
mand has arisen from sea fishermen, although trout 
anglers will be quiet perforce until May. 

On the back of the license appears "Your dollar 
is used to maintain sixteen hatcheries and egg- 
collecting stations; raise and distribute 18,000,000 
trout annually; build the most modern hatchery in 
the world; patrol 157,000 miles of fishing streams, 
make California's hatcheries the best in the world 
and make California the Anglers' Paradise." 



Saturday, January 20, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



AUTO LIGHTS FOR NIGHT TRAP SHOTS. 



Innovation Is Tried by Local Club and Sport Is 
Enjoyed by Twenty-five Gunners. 

o 

Dating back last September you may recall an 
account carried by the Breeder and Sportsman of a 
team match between the Crystal and Western Gun 
Clubs, both located near Newark, Cal. This is set 
forth because the Crystal Club just paid the bet last 
Saturday night of an elaborate turkey dinner at the 
club house and it led to something brand new in the 
alluring sport of trapshooting. 

Some twenty-five gunners enjoyed the hospitality 
of the Crystal members and as a side entertainment 
a proposal was made to have a trap shoot. Ere the 
dinner was finished it was naturally nightfall and 
the proposition of a shoot in the darkness was never 
tackled before by shooters about the bay. There 
have been tales of the Portland Club gunners enjoy- 
ing their favorite pastime in the evenings and in the 
East it is no uncommon thing. 

So, where there's a will there is a way and the 
boys tackled the job. A trap was already installed 
in back of the clubhouse and the automobiles that 
were used to transport the members to the party 
were drawn up behind the traps. The headlights 
were then put to work and the rest was simple. 

To show what success the arrangement was the 
boys made the following creditable scores out of 
twenty-five targets: Bray Thorning 21, Al Durney 
20, Bill Ellis 20, Charles Linderman 18, Ned Williams 
17, Walter Plummer 16, Otto Keifer 16, Heine Mein- 
ecke 15, Jack Trainor 15 and Jack Van Sycklin 15. 

"It was the greatest kind of sport," reports Bill 
Ellis. "We had the lights trained on top of the trap 
house and a couple of the lights that worked freely 
followed the targets. It was no trick at all to see 
the rocks and the boys busted into them with great 
delight . Of course, we did not set the traps for any 
extreme angles as we were taking no chances of 
losing the targets in the darkness. 

"I believe trap shooting at night can be made a 
great success," he continued. "The proper way 
would be to have the searchlights inside the trap 
house and play them on the targets. Just enough 
light so that the sights could be seen would be 
needed behind the shooters. Even with the automo- 
bile headlights everything worked nicely and I know 
we all enjoyed the novelty of it." 

That was not the only feature of the outing. Char- 
ley Linderman of the Western Club and Bray Thorn- 
ing of the Crystal Club were matched for a "chicken 
fight." Rivalry was keen and a spirited contest en- 
sued. To give an idea of the struggle, Linderman 
weighs in the neighborhood of 265 pounds. Thorn- 
ing, although outweighed fully a century by "Citron- 
ella," proved a gamester and through the decision 
of Senator Simms, who officiated as referee, he was 
declared the winner. He secured three out of four 
falls over Linderman. 

Not satisfied with the large evening, the shooters 
tackled the traps again on Sunday and this time 
tried their skill in daylight. The scores on fifty 
targets were as follows: Bray Thorning 46, Al Dur- 
ney 45, John Cavanaugh 43, Bill Ellis 43, Heine Mein- 
ecke (20-gauge) 39, W. A. Plummer 37, Ben Boyd 37, 
Otto Keifer 34, Nat Little 34, Herman Hertzer 34, 
Lance Baird 32, Senator Simms 32, Leon Winans 32, 
George Wagner 31, Frank SarroU 31, Truman Weav- 
er 29, Herman Wilke 28, Mike Stahl 28. 

ae 

Los Angeles Club. — Henry Pflrrmann, Jr., cham- 
pion trapshooter of California and Nevada, and who 
is known in the West for his deadly aim at the clay 
bird pastime, triumphantly blasted his way through 
twenty-five pairs of double targets Sunday at the Los 
Angeles Gun Club and won the H. E. Sargent trophy. 
His score was 43 out of 50. The results in all events 
follow : 

Sargent event, 25 pairs of doubles from 16 yard.s — 
Henry Pflrrmann 43, C. W. Fish 39, H. D. Blanchard 
38, V. A. Rossbach 38, E. K. Mohler 37, O. Council 
36, W. A. Hillis 36, V. Powley 35, Wm. Kennedy 34, 
H. E. Sargent 33, H. Cline 32, Al Pachmayr 29, A. L. 
Rowe 27. 

Take Home Competition: — At 75 targets: O. Coun- 
cil, 20 yards, broke 66; H. E. Sargent 16—63, V. Pow- 
ley 16—66, W^ H. Hillis 21—64, R. P. Riggs 16—64, 
J. Cllne 16—64, E. K. Mohler 21—63. F. H. Teeple 
20—63, V. A. Rossbach 18—63, H. Hickman 16—63, 
Mrs. H. Pflrrmann 16—63, C. W. Fish 20—62, H. 
Cline 19—62, S. Hart 16—61, H. D. Blanchard 20—60, 
A. Pachmayr 21—59, Wm. Kennedy 16—59, T. B. 
Sloan 16—57, A. L. Rowo 16—57, B. H. Carnahan 16— 
55, L. Mann 16—52, J. G. Griffith 16—38x50, J. H. 
Wearne 16—38x50, N. Israelson 16—29x50, S. E. Cole 
16—28x50, W. A. Cornelius 16—86x100, J. H. Bishop 
Jr. 16—67x75. 

00 

Young America and Trapshooting. — It is positively 
unfair — in fact, unsportsmanlike, to place a boy or 
girl before a trap with "any old gun" in the thought 
that because it is only a child it makes no particular 
difference. 

A poorly fitting stock will tend more to discourage 
a new shooter than anything else, not alone from the 
possible punishment which It delivers in the recoil, 
but the fact that the load will not land where the 
shooter looks. 

The recoil of a correctly fitting stock is not puni- 
tive. The novice soon instinctively sets his muscles 
against it and is forever after immune from a lame 



shoulder. 

Habit is strong in trapshooting and, once formed, 
is hard to break; therefore, start right. 

See that your pupil assumes a natural position, 
with the right foot slightly to the rear of the left and 
body only a little inclined forward. You may have 
some very excellent shots in your club who shoot 
in poor position. Some squat, some bend way for- 
ward, wliile others place the right foot a half yard 
to the rear of the left and bend both knees. 

Primarily this was all unnecessary, but they have 
formed the habit and it cannot be broken off. If your 
own form is poor, have your boy or girl copy that of 
some shooter who began right. — [By George Pesk. 

ac 

TRAPSHOOTING FIXTURES. 



May 8, 9, 10, 1917— Roanoke, Va.— The Interstate As- 
sociation's Twelfth Southern Trapshooting Tour- 
nament, under the auspices of the Roanoke Gun 
Club; 11,000 added money. Winner of first place 
in the Southern Handicap guaranteed $100 and 
a trophy; winner of second place guaranteed $75 
and a trophy, and the winner of third place guar- 
anteed $50 and a trophy. Several other trophies 
will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner, Manager, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

May 28, 29, 30, 1917— San Jose, Cal.— The Interstate 
Association's Twelfth Pacific Coast Trapshooting 
Tournament, under the auspices of the San Jose 
Gun Club; $1300 added money. Winner of first 
place in the Pacific Coast Handicap guaranteed 
$100 and a trophy; winner of second place guar- 
anteed $75 and a trophy, and the winner of third 
place guaranteed $50 and a trophy. Several other 
trophies will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner, 
Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

June 20, 21, 22, 1917— Hartford, Conn.— The Inter- 
state Association's Eleventh Eastern Trapshooting 
Tournament, under the auspices of the Hartford 
Gun Club; $1000 added money. Winner of first 
place in the Eastern Handicap guaranteed $100 
and a trophy; winner of second place guaranteed 
$75 and a trophy, and the winner of third place 
guaranteed $50 and a trophy. Several other tro- 
phie.s will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner, 
Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsjylvania. 

July 17, 18, 19, 1917— St. Joseph, Mo.— The Interstate 
Association's Twelfth Western Trapshooting Tour- 
nament, under the auspices of the St. Joseph 
Gun Club; $1000 added money. Winner of first 
place in the Western Handicap guaranteed $100 
and a trophy; winner of second place guaranteed 
$75 and a trophy, and the winner of third place 
guaranteed $50 and a trophy. Several other tro- 
phies will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner, 
Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

August 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 1917— Chicago, Ills.— The 
Interstate Association's Eighteenth Grand Amer- 
ican Trapshooting Tournament, under the aus- 
pices of the South Shore Country Club Gun Club; 
$4,000 added money. Winner of first place in the 
Grand American Handicap guaranteed $500 and a 
trophy; winner of second place guaranteed $400 
and a trophy; winner of third place guaranteed 
$300 and a trophy; winner of fourth place guaran- 
teed $200 and a trophy, and the winner of fifth 
place guaranteed $100 and a trophy. Numerous 
othei- trophies will also be awarded. Elmer E. 
Shaner, Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

QC 

Vernon Club. — Owen Evans smashed 48x50 targets 
at the Vernon Gun Club Sunday and by doing so won 
the gold bar offered for the high run. Charles White 
was- the runner up with a score of 47x50. In the 
practice event better scores resulted than in the 
prize event. Stanton Bruner made a 49x50 mark in 
practice, while Evans made 47x50. 

A very large crowd attended the Vernon shoot and 
but for the stiff cold wind which blew across the 
traps even better scores would have resulted. There 
were twenty-one shooters present. Following were 
the results: 





Gold 


Bar. 


Prac- 




Hdcp. 




tice. 


C. W. Clement 


16 


43 


44 


Fred Grewell 


18 


44 


22 


Charles White 


17 


47 


46 




18 


45 


44 




16 


43 


41 




18 


45 


44 




12 


45 


43 




16 


41 




William Browner 


18 


46 




0. Evans 


18 


48 


47 




16 


40 






20 


46 




J. D. Dierdoff 


18 


46 


42 




16 


41 


20 


Bob Bole 


17 


45 


44 




16 


33 




Schufer 


16 


35 




Wilt 


16 


28 




C. E. Groat 


18 


35 






18 


41 




George Mulford 


16 


45 


44 



00 

A few ducks can still be found at Alvarado and 
scullboat men are getting fairly good bags at AItIso. 
At the latter place, however, men in the shore blinds 
are lucky to get a bead on a few strays. 



LEADING SHOTS OF THE SEASON. 



Fred Harlow Tops the Amateurs and Homer Clark 
Is Best of "Pros." 



The amateur who can bust pretty close to 98 per 
cent for a season's shooting at registered targets is 
a mighty fine trapshot. And that is just what Fred 
Harlow, of Newark, Ohio, is. Harlow averaged 97.71 
for 2010 targets, or, in other words, he broke 1968. 
This average is the highest ever compiled by an 
amateur trapshot. And it has only been bettered 
twice by the professionals, by Heer in 1910, and by 
Clark in 1916. 

Only on two other occasions, previous to 1916, has 
the leader of the amateurs in average gone over 
97 per cent. Day did it in 1910, and Henderson last 
year . Henderson was over the 97 mark in 1916, too, 
being next to Harlow with an average of 97.14 on 
more than 2500 targets. But for Harlow Henderson 
would have led the high average shooters for three 
years in succession. 

Once before Harlow checked the Kentucky shot. 
That was in 1908. At that time Harlow was shooting 
off 16 yards, and Henderson from 19. They tied in 
the Grand American Handicap in Columbus, Ohio, 
and on the shoot-off Harlow won; 1916 was Harlow's 
big year. He was high average shooter in the In- 
dians and Westy Hogans — the biggest tournaments 
outside of the Grand American. In the Hogans he 
broke 490 out of 500 targets, and the weather was 
far from being ideal for the pastime. 

Following Harlow and Henderson in the amateur 
averages, come Mark Arie, of Thomasboro ,111.; H. B. 
Bonsar, Cincinnati, O.; C. H. Peck, Remington, Ind.; 
F. A. Graper, Custer Park, 111.; R. A. King, Delta, 
Col.; J. R. Jahn, Davenport, la., and A. C. Skutt, of 
Morton, N. Y. The Middle West seems to have a 
monopoly on the average honors. The East only 
broke in with the late A. B. Richardson and Skutt, 
of New York. 



The appended list shows how the leaders hit the 
targets for the past nine years: 



Year. 


Shooter. 


Shot. 


Bke. 


Av'ge 


1908- 




5690 


5383 


.9460 


1909- 


J. S. Young 


4730 


4498 


.9509 


1910- 


-J. S. Day 


4280 


4164 


.9728 


1911- 




2100 


2022 


.9623 


1912- 


-Wm. Riley 


800 


767 


.9587 


1913- 




6080 


5811 


.9557 


1914- 




2050 


1981 


.9663 


1915- 


-W. Henderson 


2800 


2731 


.9753 


1916- 




2010 


1968 


.9771 



That size and weight are not important factors in 
trapshooting was proven in 1916 by Homer Clark, of 
Alton, 111., v/hen he broke 2055 of 2100 targets shot at 
in tournaments registered by the Interstate Associa- 
tion. This gives Clark an average of 98 per cent, 
the highest ever compiled by a trapshooter, amateur 
or professional. The best previous average was 97.75 
made by William H. Heer on 2000 targets in 1910. 

Clark is the smallest in point of stature of the pres- 
ent da yprofessional trapshots. What he lacks in 
inches he makes up in ability. He is considered the 
best professional trapshot in America — even though 
he failed to win the professional championship held 
at St. Louis last August in connection with the Grand 
American handicap tournament. The championship 
was the only professional event held during the week 
that Clark did not win. 

Clark is the proverbial iceberg when it comes to 
trapshooting. He never becomes flustered, never 
hurries, and his misses are rare. He showed his 
nerve and ability in the final championship match 
for the "E. C." trophy the Sunday preceding the G. A. 
H. The youngest of the array of great shots who 
had won the trophy Clark kept smashing his clays— 
as did all the others — for a few misses would elim- 
inate one from consideration. 

The doubles was the last order of business. With 
three pairs to shoot at Bill Crosby had a lead of five 
on Clark. There didn't appear to be a chance in a 
million of Clark winning — but he did. The heat got 
Crosby and he missed all six targets. Clark broke 
every one of his and won by a target. After Crosby 
missed his last pair it was up to Clark to break both 
of his — and all eyes were centred on him. He knew 
what he had to do — and did it. 



Here is the list of the professional high average 
winners since 1908, which is the best evidence of the 
ability of the midget: 



Year. Shooter. 


Shot. 


Bke. 


Av'ge 


1908— J. M. Hawkins . . . 


5945 


5745 


.9663 


1909— C. G. Spencer , , , 


8325 


8092 


.9720 


1910— W. H. Heer 


2000 


1955 


.9775 


1911— Jno. R. Taylor . . . 


2100 


2038 


.9704 


1912— W. R. Crosby 


2000 


1952 


.9760 


1913— W. H. Heer 


5350 


5205 


.9730 


1914— L. H. Reld 


2225 


2146 


.9644 


1915— C. G. Spencer 


5620 


5480 


.9750 


1916— Homer Clark 


2100 


2055 


.9800 


Annual Run Is On. — T 


^salmon and 


striped bass 


which have been taking 


a siesta in the salt 


water 


while waiting for the first heavy rains of the 


season 



are now making their run to the spawning grounds, 
and from now on hook-and-line fishing, as well as 
seining, will be good. Both bass and salmon fishing 
will be good this season If tor no other reason than 
that the state fish and game commission, through its 
seventeen hatcheries, has planted all the streams of 
the state with large quantities of fry. The run 
should be exceptionally heavy. R. B. B. 

Sacramento, Cal. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1917. 



♦ 



AVERAGES OF CALIFORNIA SHOOTERS. 



i Sportsmen's Row 1 



From conditions existing at the present time, 
sportsmen are coming to the conclusion that, as far 
as good duck shooting is concerned, the season may 
as well close the first year instead of the last of Jan- 
uary. Birds are scattered far and wide by the stoims 
of the last few weeks and i tis doubtful now if, even 
with continued good weather, the sport will get back 
to normal before the season closes at the end of the 
month. 

* * * 

Not only are the ducks scattered, bia, ihtir iia- 
ural grounds flooded, it is difficult to find snipe. Few 
of these small birds can be picked up in their regu- 
lar haunts in the Suisun marsh, though in some local- 
ities they can be found. 

* * * 

Suisun marsh shooting for canvasbacks and blue- 
bills continues fair, and valley shooting, both north 
and south, is not as bad as in the bay localities. 
Colonel Sharpe and Colonel Dorsey picked up a limit 
at the Greenhead Club at Live Oak. 

* * * 

From a resident of the Duncans Mills country 
comes word that the last storm has not greatly dis- 
turbed the river and that fishing is fairly good in 
Austin Creek and in Austin Pool, where the creek 
flows into the Russian river. 

Recently J. Quincy Ward, executive agent of the 
Kentucky Fish and Game Commission, sold 3.50 con- 
fiscated quail at auction. The attendance at the sale 
was large and the bidding lively. The birds had been 
seized from a party who w-as handling them illegally. 
The ywere sold in dozen and half-dozen lots, each 
quail being tagged and the purchaser's name taken 
by Mr. Ward. The birds brought about $3 per dozen, 
one-half the money received for them being placed in 
the state treasury to the credit of the Fish and Game 
Commission, while the otlier half was divided equally 
between the officers who made the arrest of the 
illegal dealer. 

* * * 

.Joseph A. Addleman, ex-secretary-treasurer of the 
Portland Gun Club and one of the best-known boost- 
ei-s of amateur sports in Portland for several years, 
is visiting friends and relatives. He is now located 
at Pacific Coast representative of a large sporting 
goods concera with headquarters in San Francisco, 
but he still finds time to take a run to the Northwest 
to renew acquaintances. He will remain in Portland 
for several days. 

* * * 

C. Meach, O. J. Clossett and L. L. Mulit broke their 
first bluerocks last week in Portland, and all are firm 
in their statement that they will be regular at the 
traps from now on. Mulit managed to finish with 
the highest score of the trio, and all the scores were 
good. 

James K. Simpson, president of the Steventon 
(Wash.) Gun Club, is figuring on holding several 
shoots at his club during the 1917 season, and he has 
placed a standing invitation to the members of the 
Portland Gun Club to take in the events. 

T. E. Doremus, president of the Interstate Associ- 
ation and well known along the Pacific Coast, is fig- 
uring on being present at the Pacific Coast handicap 
contests at San Jose, and later take in the North- 
west shoot during the Rose Festival in Portland two 
weeks later. He makes his annual visit to I'ortland 
during the trap.^hooting season, and is a welcome 
visitor from \\ ilmingtbn, Del. 

Billy Price finally got out after ducks last Satur- 
day afternoon. Accompanied by George Thomas, 
he ducked over to Alvarado. We understand that Bill 
got several birds but he kept the extent of his bag 
a secret. 

QG 

E. B. Van Arnam Dead. 

E. B. Van Arnam, one of the best known profes- 
sional trapshots in the northwest and a former base- 
ball star on the Pacific coast, died at his home in 
Portland last week after an illness of several months. 
For the past several years Van Arnam was a familiar 
figure in the tournaments of the Portland Gun club. 
Eighteen years ago Van Arnam played baseball with 
the Minneapolis team of the American association 
under the name of Billy Lavan. Later "Van," as he 
was known known to his friends, played ball in San 
Diego and Los Angeles. 

* * * 

Fandom lost a real friend and boo.-^u i iii ii ■ 
of E. B. Van Arnam. Mr. Van Arnam had been a 
representative of the Winchester Repealing Arms 
Co. for the last three or four years with headquar- 
ters at Portland, Oregon. He was a good trapshooter 
and was capable of turning in scores of better than 
90%. He became ill at the big shoot at Portland 
last September. He was a member of the Portland 
Gun Club. 

He is survived by a widow and San, Wilberl ; a 
brother, W. J. Van Arnam of Omaha. Neb., and two 
sisters, Mrs. Edith Rubdioux of Omaha and Mrs. A. 
R, Sauer of San Diego. 



Heme Pfirrmann Stands Out With the Best Record 
With O. N. Ford Close Up. 



Hnofficial averages of California's trap Bhots, as 
compiled by Sporting Life .show that Heine Pfirr- 
mann of Los Aiigelo;;, the Califomin-Xevada State 
champion, stands 'urs with a 

mark of .9604. (■ . which en- 

titles him to an Dim . i i, i .in-; ted 2017 of 

them. O. N. Ford of San Jose comes next with .9446 
out of 6580 targets. 

In the professional ranks, E. L. Mitchell just did 
nose out Dick Reed in a close contest, only a frac- 
tion separating them above the .96 mark. The avi 
ages follow:-- 



broke 
150— 
I iio -1292, 
.9112; Ar- 
ues, C. R., 
San Pran- 

: Balk- 
P. S., 

f., San 
.500— 



rhard, 
R. E., 
i'., WaU- 
inas, 160— 
" iw— 154, 
: Bru- 
1 -ay, R. 
I'J., Fresno, 
, 1110—947, 



Amatf 
1555, pe. 

115, .76o(>; .■.it ISC),;, r,. 
.9168; Arncill. J. M., Cam;! 
nold. R. ' ' ' • 
Miulrou' 
Cisco, 31' 

Babcock, F. D., 
win. H. Cr., Stocl 
Maple Cn ok. 11.' 
Dipgo, ;!Oo— 2)(;. ■ 
441, .8820; I:.' 
Bano, J. B., 
A. F., San Ji 
Cisco, 2iMj- 1 ' 
450- -38«. .S.57. , 
Blackstock, C. F., U\n: 
H. D., Los Angeles? P 
Los Angeles, llOi) 
din.glon, 70--41, . 
107, .6687; 
.77(tO; Brick, 
ner, S. A., Lm 
H., Ocean Park, 
50—29, .5800; Bn. 
.7800. 

I'oletnan, G. K., Enreka. 75fr— 629, .8386; Considine, 
John, San Franci; < ' 1010, .8416; Cook. W. E., 
Eureka. 40—29, .7 lius, W. A.'. Los Angeles, 

85i»— 79r. .9352; Co . W. J., Lo;^ \ > ' 410— 

383, .9341; Council, Owen, Los An —713, 
.8912; Cowan, O. A., Fresno, 150—!' Cross- 
man, Mrs. E. C, Los Anwles, 30u— 220. .i j:::;; Cross- 
man, E. C, Los Angeles. 3im)— 275, .9166; CHitler. F., 
Eureka. 40—27, .6744. 

Daniels, D., San Francisco, 100—86, .8600; David- 
son. D. C, Modesto, 600- 558, .9300; De Au.gustine, 
F., Los Angeles, 60— 31, .5166; Dierdoff, J. D., Long 
BcHch, 340—322, .9470; Dodds, J. F., San Diego, 5980 
--5606, .9374; Dougherty, Wm., 200—185, .9250; Dunn, 
T. N., San Diego, 140—123, .8785. 

Eilert, W. J.. Fresno, 950—832, .8756: Ekdale, E. 
E., Pasadena, 150—129, .8600; Ellis, G. E., Stockton, 
600—528. .8800; Evans, O. A., Los An.geles, 1400— 
1306, .9328; Everding, L., Arcada, 60—51, .8500. 

Falk, C. C, fJurekay 4U--23, :5750: F ''- '' O., Eu- 
reka, 550—432, .7854; Palk, B. V., M- -530, 
.8833; Fish, C. W., I^s Angele.>=. 1" .9053; 
Fisher, C. W.. 300- 233, .7766; ' 1.., Fresno, 

150—110, .7330; Flifkinr?.T. A G 1660—1553, 
.9355; Fo ' ■ " .9446; For- 

rest, Ij. < 172 ; Free, P., Pasa- 

dena, 41*' i; 1 . ! . B., Los Angeles, 550 

—480, .8727; Fuller, R. N.. Tiihire, 1450— 1:M6, .9282. 

Garrison. Tl..nr\-. >Todesto, 950—826, .8694; Goff, 
L C, V i -112, .8615; Growell, Fred, 

Los Ang. .9244; Groat, C. E., Los Ange- 

les, 170I.I-- Groat, Mrs. C. E., Los Angeles, 
1330—1102, .8962. 

Haesc, J. P., Santa i -'li i "i ' n' .8993; 
Hagcrman, C. D., Los - . Hali- 

burlon, A. P., Lindsay, i II. L., 

IjOs Angeles, 60 -55, .9166; ^ . 70 — 

53, .7428; Hartmnn, R. C T , .70.00; 

Havens, H.. 1 ■ *lutl; lime, T. W., 

Eureka, 80- .'- A., Eureka, 750— 

635. .8466; Hi..; I).. i _.. Ka, 550 — 171, .8564: 

Hoelle ,E., San Francisco, 40^-361. .9025; Hogg, R. 
C, Saratoga, 400—325, .8125; Hostetter, P. P., Lind- 
sav. 200- 152, .TO'tO; Howard, N. A., Piedmont, 3500 — 
3167, .9018; Huber, C. C, Newman, 350—290, .8285; 
Hutcheson, J. M., Eureka, 150—104, .6933 . 

Innes, W. E., Eureka, 350—252, .7200.; 

Tnckson, C. B., Fresno, 150—116, .7733; Jackson, 
W.. Lindsay, 150—105, 7000; Julian, C. H., San Diego, 
300—273, .blOO. 

Kelly, H., Eureka, 150—120. .8000; Koch, W. L., 
San Francisco, 120- 78, .6500. 

Llewellvn, D. E., 150—119, .8933; Ix)ng. P. O., Up- 
land, 150—137, .9133; Lorenson, H., Newman. 1350— 
12X9, .9177; Lovelace, Guy, Dibebe. 350—302, .8628. 

Manderville, C. P., Los Angeles. 700-606. .8657; 

Martin, J. ! '' ■ "1; Martin. 

C. C, Wi(d(lii v., Salin- 

as. 360- 277, . . lo.^e, 700— 

555, .7302; McFadden, C, Siiinas. 360—315, .8750: 
McPadden, 1)., Blanco. 760—652, .8578; McGottig.ui, 
C. D., San Francisco, 200—176, .8800: .McKagney, 
W. J., San Jose, 860—734. .8534; Meek, J. W., Los 
Ai' ieles, 200- 181, .9200; Melford, Geo., Gi ' ■ ""i 

171, .8700; .Melius, T. H., Los Angeles, 
.!».".25; Melius, L. R., Los An.geles, 1200— 1' .. ; 
.Meirill, J. G., San Diego, 300—268. .8933: Meyers, 
Miss G. J., San Franci.'ico, 1020—745, .7303; MilUgan, 
J., Oxnard, 5.90—521, .8830; Mills, F. B., Las Alamitos, 



340—332, .9764; Mohler, Mrs. E. K., Los Angeles, 
240—175. .7291; Mohler, E. K., Los Angeles, 700 — 
649, .9270. 

Nook, L. J.. Fresno, 150—103, .6866; Nash, C. H., 
San Jose, 2080—1849, .8889; Newbert, P. M., Sacra- 
mento, 600—556, .9206; Nichols, P.. Los Angeles, 200 
—181. .9050; Nichols. C. P., Los Angeles, 200—185, 
.9250; Nickle, C. L., Glendora, 120—109, .9083. 
O.gilvie, H., Lindsay, 1750—1636, .9348. 
Pachmayr, A. M., Los Angeles, 150—124, .8266; 
Packard, Dr. L. M., Los Angeles, 1920—1796, .9354; 
Palmer, L. H., Los Angeles, 200—175, .8750; Parker, 
E. O., 75—40, .6133; Peet, H. C, San Francisco. 240— 
200, .8333; Peterson, il. E., Los Angeles, 100—84, 
.8400; J firnuann, H. Jr., Los Angeles, 2100—2017, 
' 1; Pfirrmann, Mrs. H., Los Angeles, 640—500. 
: Phinney. H. R., Berkeley, 200—179, .8950; 
:.ett, J. P., Modesto, 200—174, .8700; Powers, C. 
J., Eureka, 40—21, .5250; Price, W. H., San Francisco. 
200- -163. .8250; Prior. T., San Francisco, 1160—1057, 
.9111; Pura. P. C. Gonzales, 560—468. .9360. 
Reu'or. .L W., 150—115, .7666; Ricks. H. L. Jr.. Eu- 
-122, .8133; Riley. T, D., San Francisco. 
.8459; Robinson, R. D.. Fresno, 150—116, 
i.ossbach, V. A., Los Angeles. 2620—2251, 
.8591; Rock. Mrs. A. L.. Whittier. 45—27, .6000; 
Rowe, A. L., Whittier. 150—124. .8266; Ruhstaller, 
D. J., Sacramento, 600—510, .8500 Ruhstaller, P. J., 
Sacramunto, 600—484. .8066; Russ. I. A., Eureka, 
150—100, .6666; Russell, S. G., San Francisco, 50— 
33, .6600. 

Sloan, W. T., 200—171, .8550; Slocum, L. W., Fres- 
no, 1850—1660, .8974; Smith, B. E., Oakland, 100—77, 
.77.00; Smith, S. R., Los Angeles, 450—405, .9000; 
Stall, G. E.. Masonic, 700—593, .8471; Stamper, E., 
Saratoga, 200—163, .8150; Stamper, C. L.. Newman. 
100— 8S. .8800; StelUng, H.. San Francisco. 520—276. 
.8625. 

Teeple, P. H., Los Angeles, 30—24, .8000; Terry, 
W. J., Oakl.md, 200—180, .9000; Tevis, I. K., San Ma- 
teo, ir.o— 110, .7333; Thlocke, P., Salinas, 200—156, 
.7800; Thomas, G., San Francisco, 100—82, .8200; 
Thompson, Ned, Tulare, 50—26, .5200; Thompson, H., 
Tuhire, 150—122, .8133: Thorning, E. B.. San Fran- 
cisco. 200—160, .8000; Topham, Dr. E.. San Francis- 
co, 300—230, .7666. 

"Van Brunt." 80—71. .8875; Van Nest. A., Los An- 
geles, 400—308, .7700; Varien, W. H., Pacific Grove, 
600—556, .9266; Voris. C. A.. Los Angeles. 300—277, 
.9233. 

Walker. G. C. Oakland, 200—148, .7400; Walsh, R. 
J., San Diego. 200—157, .7850; Wheeler, Miss Alene. 
Los Angeles. 210—168. .8000; M'ickland. N., Bakers- 
field, 400—355, .8875; Wilkes. Thos.. San Francisco. 
1350—1188, .8800; Wilkes, A. G., San Francisco. 1760 
— ti'.OS. .9136: Wilkes. Mrs. A. G., San Francisco, 
1445—1098, .7598: Williams, H. M., San Diego, 900— 
79i\ .8877; Wil.shire, W. H., Los Angeles, 350—320, 
.9142; Witman, R. B.. Oxnard, 200—190, .9500; Wors- 
wirk, Wm. H.. Los Banos, 100—51. .5100i Worthen, 

B. H.. San Francisco, 600—556, .9266. 
Professionals— Willett, W. P., San Francisco, 1100 

—998. .9027: Shreves. W. O.. Mavfield, 150—128. 
.8533; lUcklefson, H., San Francisco, 900—703. .7811; 
Reed. Richard, San Francisco, 2200—2177, .9632; Pos- 
ton, H. B., San Francisco. 5020—4751, .9464; Oliver. 
G. E., Los Angeles, 1600—1383, .8644; Moore. J. W. 
P.. San Francisco. 200—121, .6050; Mitchell, E. L.. 
Ijos Angeles. 2200—2124, .9654; Knight. C. H., San 
Francisco, 1950—1733, .8876; Jones, O. N., San Fran- 
cisco, 800—615, .7687; Hoyt, H. A.. Los Angeles, 2320 
—2040, .8793; Ilolohan; Guy E., Los Angeles, 3260— 
3070, .9417; Higgins, W. J., San Francisco. 600—476, 
.7933; Heath, J. G., San Francisco, 400—341, .8525; 
Hawxhurst, L. S., Oakland, 3380—3170, .9378; Haight, 

C. A., San Francisco, 2880—2409, .9364; French, J. S.. 
Berkeley, 210—130, .6190; Feudner, M. O., San Fran- 
cisco, 950—857, .9011; Ellis, W. R.. San Francisco. 
1310—1107, .8430; Clement, C. W., South Pasadena. 
300—253, .8433; Cook. L. J.. Oakland, 2160—1959. 
.9069; Breanen, J. R., Sacramento, 300—225, .7500; 
Bruner, A. W., Los Angeles, 1120—869. .7758. 

Trade Notes. — At the opening shoot of the Port- 
land Gun Club on January 7th, Mrs. C. J. Schilling 
started the new year with the phenomenal score by 
breaking 100 targets without a miss. As the Port- 
land paper reports: "Target after target fell before 
the splendid shooting Portland Diana, who was per- 
forming in machine-like style, never flinching at the 
hard left and right ansrle birds." 

In competition with iw-enty-two other club mem- 
bers the next amateur score was 88x100. The near- 
est professional was that, of Mr. C. J. Schilling, with 
96x100. 

^Irs. Schilling made this phenomenal score with a 
Remington U. M. C. Pump gun and Nitro Club shells, 
the winning combination that has made her many 
records possible. U 

C. P. Shaw !ind A. J. Dands. both shooting the 
perfect combination of a Remington pump gun and 
the "Speed Shc-lis," won the first and second places 
respectively at a recent .shoot of the Westmont 
(N. J.) Field Club.' 

The Manor Gun Club of Clarkson, Ont., Can., held 
an interesting shoot recently at which 33 followers 
of the clay saucer faced the traps. W. H. Gooder- 
ham of Toronto, shooting Nitro Club "Speed Shells" 
was hiuli amati'ur with a score of 90x100. Norman 
Gocd<>rham and H. Simpson, both shooting the same 
bi-sind of shells as the winner, won second and third 
places respectively. 



Saturday, January 20, 1917] 



« 

THE BRKEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



GREAT YEAR FOR FIELD TRIALS. 



Record of Winners in Events on Pacific Coast. 



The year just closed indubitably has been the ban- 
ner year in the history of field trials, taking into 
consideration all the facts connected therewith. The 
remarkable increase in the number of clubs holding 
trials is mainly due to the fact that owners of point- 
ers and setters all over the country are taking an 
active interest in trials through the medium of ama- 
teur organizations, and to this fact alone is mainly 
due the greatly increased interest and the successful 
year. 

On what is usually denominated the main circuit, 
starting with the United States trials last January, 
the only notable additions to tlie list are the National 
Field Trial Club's new Free-For-AU Championship 
Stake, the inaugural trials of the SouthweKtern Field 
Trial Club at Vinita, Okla., and the Continental Field 
Trial Club's successful essay at holding prairie chick- 
en trials at Towner, N. D. In the amateur ranks, or 
of clubs holding trials where the owners of the dogs 
participated as handlers may be noted the return to 
the ranks of the Oregon Field Trial Club, the start of 
a new club in Maryland under the appellation of the 
Bird Dog Club of Maryland, and the grouse trials at 
Pittsfield, Pa. 

Among the notable events of the year must not 
be overlooked the winding up of the career of the 
great pointer, John Proctor, in a real blaze of glory, 
wherein he accomplished the wonderful task of win- 
ning both the National Championship and the Free- 
for-All Championship Stake in a space of a little over 
a week, a feat unsurpassed in the annals of field 
trials. It is also worthy of note that the pointers 
generally have continued in their victorious career, 
and the close of the year undoubtedly found the pre- 
ponderance of honors, in proportion to the number 
of starters, with the short-haired representatives. 
The National trials and events on the Coast follow: 
NATIONAL FIELD TRIAL CLUB. 
Calhoun, Ala., January 9. 
Judges: W. W. Titus and L. W. Blankenbaker. 
ALL-AGE STAKE— Twenty-four Starters, Thirteen 

Eijglish Setters and Eleven Pointers — 
1st.— Lewis C. Morris, 27046 (Fishel's Frank— Bessa- 
tina) ; white and liver pointer dog. E. J. Rowe, 
owner; W. D. Gilchrist, handler. 
2d— Gibraltar Ollie, 26583 (Gibraltar— Comanche) ; 
white and orange setter bitch. G. C. Parsons, 
owner; J. A. Gude, handler. 
3d — John Proctor, 25105 (Fishel's Frank — Miss Mari- 
utch) ; white and lemon pointer dog. A. L. Cur- 
tis, owner; C. H. Babcock, handler. 
DERBY — Twenty-seven Starters, Nineteen English 

Setters and Eight Pointers — 
1st — Gunner, 34529 (Free Lance — Cotton Blossom); 
white, black and tan setter dog. Fleiscliniann 
&. Bedford, owners; C. H. Babcock, handler. 
2d— Attakapas Rap, 32378 (Manitoba Rap— Lady Fer- 
ris) ; white and liver pointer dog. I. G. Abney, 
owner; Herbert Fishel, handler. 
3d— King Cy, 32651 (John's King— Bird's Dakota 
Pride) ; white and lemon pointer dog. Dr. T. 
E. Barber, owner; M. E. McMichael, handler. 
Calhoun, Ala., January 24. 
Judges: Theodore Sturges and L. W. Blankenbaker. 
FREE-FOR-ALL CHAMPIONSHIP STAKE — Nine 
Starters, Five Pointers and Four English Setters? — 
Winner — John Proctor, 25105 (Fishel's Frank — Miss 
Marmtch) ; white and lemon pointer dog. A. L. 
Curtis, owner; C. H. Babcock, handler. 
PACIFIC COAST FIELD TRIAL CLUB. 
Bakersfield, Cal., December 14. 
Judges: J. H. Schuniaker, P. M. Wand, Wm. Dormer. 
DERBY— Ten Starters, Six English Setters and Four 
Pointer.s— 

1st — Maggie G. (Vancouver Chief — Vancouver Nel- 
lie) ; white and black pointer bitch. Wilkes & 
McKeon, owners; A. G. Wilkes, handler. 

2d — Sonoma Girl (Old Forester — Caesar's Keep- 
sake); wh'te and black setter bitch. J. A. 
Chanslor, owner; Fred Coutts, handler. 

3d — True Blue (Old Forester — Caesar's Keepsake); 
blue belton setter. Fred De Augustine, owner; 
Fred Coutts, handler. 

ALL-AGE STAKE— Thirteen Starters, Eight English 
Setters and Five Pointers — • 

1st— Pleeiret?t») 29105 (Spot's Rip Rap— Jess Rus- 
sell)" Kite and black pointer bitch. J. W. 
Scott; bWiler and handler. 

2d— Fordttey "lilondy, 39391 (Stanley's Triumph— 
Hollyrohd) ; white and orange pointer dog. E. 
B. Tinkef, owner; Fred Coutts, handler. 

3d^PdreBtresS ' (Old Forester— Linda B.) ; black, 
' Whitfe- '^afrd tan setter bitch. S. Christensou, 
owh^f Krld handler. 

MEMBERS*' STAKE— Eight Starters, Five English 
Setters "and' Three Pointers — 

1st— Dixie'- Chase (Sven C — Blue Bonnet) ; blue bel- 
ton setter bitch. J. S. French, owner; A. G. 
Wilkes, handler. 

2d — Kenwood Fan (Melrose Dud? — Caesar's Keep- 
sake) ; white, black and tan setter bitch. J. A. 
Chanslor, owner and handler. 

3d — Orange Blossom (Bohemian Prince — Peach Nug- 
get) ; white and orange setter bitch. S. Chris- 
tensou, owner and handler. 

OREGON FIELD TRIAL CLUB. 
Portland, Ore., September 18. 
Judge: E. A. Parsons. 

DERBY— Thirteen Starters, Ten English Setters and 
Three Pointers — 



1st— Count Monug (Moring — Ruby Gladstone Rod- 
field) ; black, white and tan setter dog. M. Abra- 
ham, owner; H. T. Drenneu, handler. 

2d — Rowdy (Cliii Uon Chops — Trixie II) ; white and 
black setter do.g. Dr. E. W. Morse, owner; 
Thomas Ilowo, handler. 

3d— Nellie (^ray (Kiim Mark's Belle); white and 
liver iioiuu.r bitch. H. T. DrcJinen, owner and 
handler. 

ALL-AGE-STAKE- Sovou Starters. Four English Set- 
ters ,Two Pointers and One Iri 
Ist-Chow'.s Chossio 29994 (M,' -Bryan's 

Chow-Chow) ; white, a i.ui .-otter bitch. 

C. G. Liebe, owner; nneu, handler. 

2d— Fleetwood Flip (liuv . > ,-,^,.v Ilawley) ; white, 

black, tan and ticked setter bitch. T. R. Whito- 

sido, owner am! ' ■ r. 
Etiual 3d — 15ing N ( not given) ; white and 

black pointer : ;. Nealand, owner and 

handler. 

Equal 3d- Jack uitzell — Blake's Nellie); 

blu" boltou 1 u I . Frank Pattou, owner; 

W. E. Martin, liaudler. 
WASHINGTON FIELD TRIAL CLUB. 
Tacoma, Wash., February 21 
Jduge: .E. A. Parsons. 
MEMBERS' DERBY— Four Starters, Three English 

Setters and One Pointer — 
lst»-My Tillacum, 36588 (Cayuga— Ramona's' Ruby) ; 

white, black, tan and tickt d setter bitch. M. A. 

Howe, owner and handler. 
Equal 2d — Ben Jax. 35021 (Don Momo Rodfleld — Ra- 

mona's Ruby) ; white, black, tan and ticked 

setter dog. -P. E. King, owner and handler. 
Equal 2d— Matoca, 34346 (Fishel's Frank — Lad's 

Waneda) ; white, orange and ticked pointer dog. 

F. D. Dean, owner and handler. 
3d — My Pal, 36565 (Cayu.ga— Ramona's Ruby) ; white, 

black, tan and ticked setter dog. M. A. Howe, 

owner and handler. 
OPEN DERBY— Nine Starters, Eight English Setters 

and One Pointer — 
1st— Destiny Buck, 34256 (Don Momo Rodfleld— Ra- 

mcna's Ruby) ; blue belton setter bitch. A. H. 
. Nelson, owner and handler. 
2d — Momo s I-ady Lou, 36139 (Dow Momo Rodfleld — 

Queen Lou); white, black, tan and ticked setter 

bitch. Billctt & Van Derveer, owners; R. G. 

Billett, handler. 
3d— Llewellin Danstone's Duke, 35082 (Llewellin 

Dan.stone— Jessie Bi u! ^ white, black and 

ticked setter dog. 'rov.n, owner and 

handler. 

ALL-AGE STAKE — Four Starters, Three English 

Setters and One Pointer — 
1st -Lometa, 29349 (Manitoba Rap— Frank's Lottie 

B) ; white, liver and Lick(;d pointer bitch. F. D. 

Dean, owner and handler. 
2d— Destiny Buck, 34256 (Don Momo Rodfleld— Ra- 
mona's Ruby) ; blue belton setter bitch. A, H. 

Nelson, owner and handler. 
3d— Queen Lou, 26546 (Pony Boy— Emma Lou) ; 

white, black, tan and ticked setter bitch. Billett 

& Van Derveer, owners; R. G. Billctt, handler. 
Yelm, Wash,, September 11. 
Judge: Dr. Meyer. 
OPEN DERBY— Twelve Starters, Seven English Set- 
ter? and Five Pointers — 
1st— Matoca, 34346 (i'^ishel's Frank — Lad's Waneda); 

w^hite, orange and ticked pointer dog. F. D. 

Dean, owner and handler. 
2d — Nellie Gray (King — Mark's Belle); white and 

liver pointer bitch. T. H. Drennen, owner and 

handler. 

3d— T-iebe's King (General Whitestone — Queen) ; 
white, black and titn setter dog. C. G. Liebe, 
owner and handler. 

OPEN ALL- AGE' STAKE— Nine Starters, Six Eng- 
lish Setters and Three Pointers — 

1st- Ramona's Ruby, 30506 (Paliacho— Ramona) ; 
white, black and ticked setter bitch. F. M. 
Stephenson, owner; A. H. Nelson, handler. 

2d— Memo's Lady Lou, 36139 (Don Momo— Queen 
Lou) ; white, black and tan .setter bitch. L. S. 
Mclntyre, owner; F. E. King, handler. 

Equal 3d— Irene Daii.stoae'.s Marie, 28079 (Llewellin 
banstone - Marie's Queeii) ; white, black and 
tan sol tor bitch. A. D. Opdyk cfe Co., owners; 
Mr. Woodword, handler. 

Equal 3d— Chow's Bessie, 29994 (Marse Ben— Bry- 
an's Chow-Chow) ; white, black and tan setter 
bitch. C. G. Liebe, owner; H. T. Drennen, 
handler. 

SUBSCRIPTION DERBY — Si.K Starters, Four Eng- 
lish Setlors and Two I'ointers— 

l.st -Maioc.i, :'.i;46 (Fishel's Frank— Lad's Waneda); 
white, orange and lickc.-d pointer dog. F. D. 
De.in, owner and handler. 

2d— Maggie G. (Vancouver Chief— Vancouver Nel- 
lie) ; white and black pointer bitch. Delta Ken- 
nels, owners; C. Herman, handler. 

3d— Mohawk Teas (Melrose Mohawk— Tess) ; white, 
blfirk and licked setter bitch, Lyle & Frazier, 
owners; Mr. Herman, handler. 

SUBSCRIPTION ALL-AGE STAKE — Ten Starters, 
Six English Setters and Four Pointers- 

1h{— Melrose Dude, 25953 (Mclroso Prince— Kil's Jcs- 
•■.ie) ; white, black and tan setter dog. Mrs. A. 
G. Wilkes, owner; II. Ileiman, handler. 

2d -FU eirette, 291<i5 (Spot's Rip Rap — J< ss Russoll) ; 
v. liite and black pointer bitch. Charlos Murray, 
owner; C. Hennan, liandler. 

3d— Shotover (Tod Sloan— Wilson's Point); while 
and liver pointer dog. C. Godson, owner: c. 
Hennan, handler. 



NEW CLASSES FOR WESTMINSTER SHOW. 



Innovations Are Started and Are Attracting Wide- 
spread Interest. 



Premium lists for the forty-first annual dog show 
of the \\ ostniinster Kennel Club, to be held at Mad- 
ison Square Garden, from February 20 to 23, inclu- 
sive, have bei n mailed. New classes will at once 
attract attention, for the oldest and premier club iu 
American dogdom has started several innovations in 
bench show classifications. The aggregate of the 
money prizes to be given by the Westminster Kennel 
dab is about $15,000. Special prizes, which include 
plate as well as cash, v ill aggregate as much more. 

The Board of Governors has been increased by the 
election of Henry Payne Whitney to succeed the late 
Hormanus B. Duryea. One of the new special classes 
is for the best team of four pointers. English set- 
ters, or Irish setters, shown by members of the Point- 
er Club of America, English Setter Club of America 
or the Irish Setter Club of America. The prize is the 
Hennanus B. Duryea Memorial Cup, the gift of his 
widow, which becomes the property of the club show- 
ing the winning team. 

Twenty-seven of the members offer cups to be 
won outright, the list including the president's cup, 
given by R. H. Williams, for the best team entered 
in the regular classes, and the vice-president's cup, 
given by Francis R. Hitchcock, for the best brace 
under the same conditions. The Westminster Kennel 
Club offers $150 for the best pack of American fox 
hounds, and ^100 for the best pack of beagles. They 
will be judged on Friday, February 23, which will be 
known as Hound Day, and members and masters of 
hunt clubs will wear the club uniforms to celebrate 
the occasion. All the classes for foxhounds will be 
judged on that morning, which is another innovation 
and will specialize the interest on the day for fox- 
hounds and increase the interest of the riders to 
hounds. 

The new classification, which has the approval of 
the American Kennel Club, begins as usual with the 
classes for puppies, novices, junior, limit, open and 
American bred, with separate classes for each sex. 
Then follow the innovations, details of which are 
given in full: 

Graduate Classes. — For dogs that have not won a 
first prize of the value of .|10 or over in the regular 
classes under A. K. C. rules; wins in puppy, novice, 
maiden, bred by exhibitor and selling classes ex- 
cepted. 

Maiden Classes. — For dogs that have not won a 
prize in any class at any show under A. K. C. rules. 

Debut.inte Classes. — For dogs that have never been 
exhibited at any show prior to the closing of entries 
at this show. 

Selling Classes. — For dogs which are entered to 
be sold at a price not exceeding the limit named. 

* * * 

"Scotty" Allan, three times winner of the Alaskan 
sweepstakes with a team of dogs, has established a 
new record for making the round trip from Nome 
to Valdez in little more than ten days by means of 
an "aero sled." By dog teams the trip usually is 
made in about eighty days. 

Allan took the dogs to France for use in the battle 
front in the Vosges Mountains, and on his way back 
to Nome he purcha.sed an engine and propeller, which 
he installed on a sled. After several trials he under- 
took the Nome-Valdez journey, about eleven hundred 
miles, in the face of much scepticism. He started 
from Nome and seventy-two hours later he arrived 
in Valdez, and returning reached Nome on November 
11th. His machine is described as a combination 
hydroplane!, aeroplane and sled, with gasoline as the 
motive power. 

* * * 

Over at Somerville, N. J., some years ago a terrific 
thunder storm broke, and there was a family in which 
there was an Airedale terrier and a little child about 
three years old. The child was playing out in the 
lutchen, which adjoined a bedroom, and when the 
first fierce clap of thunder came the dog rushed out, 
seized the child by the clothes and dragged him in 
under the bed. 'riie mother came looking for her 
offspring, and when ^he tried to get him out the 
terrier snarled at her and would not let her budge 
the baby. The mother, thinking the dog had suddenly 
gone mad because of the excitement caused by the 
stt.rm, decided to shoot her pet. She went to a 
bureau drawer and obtained a revolver, but she 
was afraid to shoot fearing she would miss and kill 
her baby. Just as she drew back a bolt of lightning 
struck the kitchen where the child had been playing, 
and in a moment it was a mass of flames. After the 
crack llio Airedale came out, wagged his tail and 
allowed the mother to release the baby. This may 
sound like a fish story, but it is vouched for by a 
very reputable fancier, who says he would be willing 
to make affidavit t othe facts. 

QC 

The annual meeting of the United States Field 
Trials club was held with President Stephenson in 
the chair. The present officers were re-elected and 
a motion was passed to lease more ground which is 
contiguous to the old preserve . Not that there is 
insufficient land to run the trials satisfactorily, but 
the opportuiiltv was at hand to secure this ground 
and the club had no idea of allowing it to slip away. 
The next annual trials will be held the first week in 
January, 1918. 



1 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1917. 



I Stock Breeders' Page | 

lglHl l8»glgR!gllgllSllgl l5iaiBII^^ 

The California Breeders Sales and Pedigree Com- 
pany held an auction sale of nineteen registered Hol- 
stein bulls at Gonzales, Monterey county, on Satur- 
day, January 6th, that attracted a large attendance 
of dairymen who reside in that section. There was 
not a poor bull in the lot, and while prices were not 
as large as might have been made in other localities, 
the California Breeders Sales and Pedigree Company 
officials are well satisfied, as the sale of every bull 
contributed to the improvement of the dairy stock 
in that section of the State. The nineteen bulls sold 
for a total of $3,875, an average of $204. The top 
price of the sale was made by the nine-months-old 
calf Manteca Tilly Alcartra, from the Henderson Co. 
herd of Sacramento county, which was sold to Pura 
Bros, for an even $500. 

<S> <?> 

Thirty thousand cows of Northern California are 
controlled by the newly-formed Northern California 
Milk Producers' Association. Thirteen counties are 
represented in the organization which was formed for 
the purpose of securing protective measures looking 
to the advancement of the dairying business, which 
is one of the most rapidly growing of the Northern 
California industries. The dairymen believe that 
they can through organization, have some power in 
fixing the price of the product to the consumer. 

♦ «> ♦ 

An appropriation of $250,000 will be asked of the 
Legislature for the University Farm at Davis. A 
committee appointed by the Sacramento Valley De- 
velopment Association has been appointed to work 
for the same and this committee is composed of Sen- 
ator Rush, Mars-hall Diggs, Morris Brooks, J. W. 
Kearth, Judge P. J. Shields and Assemblyman Louis 
Tarke. 

♦ «> ♦ 

A Holstein cow owned by Oliver Capbna of Elma 
Center, New York, recently broke the world's rec- 
ord for butter fat production, producing in seven 
days 722 pounds of milk out of which 40.544 pounds 
of butter fat was received. This is equal to a little 
over 60 pounds of commercial butter. 

<S> <S> 

At the meeting of the Missouri State Board of 
Agriculture recently, J. Kelly Wright and Samuel 
Jordan were re-elected to the position of institute 
lecturers for a period of three years at salaries of 
$3,000 a year. This is the first time that the insti- 
tute lecturers were elected for a certain term of 
years and the sterling worth of the two men re- 
elected was recognized by the board, who voted unan- 
imously for their retention. The report of the sec- 
retary of the board, Jewell Meys, sets forth just 
•what has been accomplished by the board and what 
progress has been made to improve agricultural con- 
ditions of the state. According to Mr. Mayes' report 
the year 1916 was one of the most successful years 
of the board. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Nolan Huddleston, an extensive buyer and shipper 
of horses and mules in Callaway county. Mo., shipped 
a load of horses and mules to Wynne, Ark., last week. 
These were purchased in North Callaway and South- 
ern Audrain counties at good prices. 

^ «> <S> 

At the annual meeting of the Standard Poland 
China Record Association, held at the head office of 
the association in Maryville, Mo., Jan 3, Walter W. 
Head of St. Joseph, Mo.; O. E. Wade of Rising City, 
Neb., and S. McKelvie of Fairfield, Neb., were elected 
directors for a term of three years, succeeding H. C. 
Lookabaugh of Watonga, Okla. ; W. A. Baker of But- 
ler, Mo.; and S. McKelvie, whose terms expired. 
John B. Lawson of Clarinda, la., was elected presi- 
dent of the association, vice H. B. Walter of Effing- 
ham, Kan., whose term had expired. C. D. Bellows 
of Maryville was elected to succeed himself as treas- 
urer. F. L. Garrett, formerly assistant secretary, was 
elected secretary, succeeding Ray Davis, whose term 
of office expired. The office of assistant secretary 
was abolished, and the salary of the secretary was 
fixed at il,800 a year. 

<S> ❖ * 

Demand for war horses at the National Stock 
Yards market, St. Louis, continues brisk. Daily in- 
spections are being made by the French, Italian and 
Belgian representatives; while the British represen- 
tatives are holding inspections Monday and Tuesday 
of each week. During the first week of the year, the 
French government bought 262 head of horses and 
468 head of mules, the Italian government bought 
206 head of horses and 77 head of mules, while the 
Belgian government bought 80 head of horses. The 
war horse demand, combined with the brisk South- 
em demand, had made the market the best in its 
history. 

♦ ^ «> 

Alex Keith, of Sturgeon, Mo., left this week for 
Havana, Cuba, where he has a stable of race horses 
for rhe meeting that now is in progress there. 
^ <8> 

Irvin Maddox, of McCredie, Mo., recently sold 26 
head of mules for $227.50 around. J. Ed. Moore, rep- 
resenting the Maxwell-Crouch Company, National 
Slock Yards, being the buyer. Mr. Maddox also sold 
another load on the National market at $200 around, 
and has yet one load on feed. 



PURE BRED SIRES ON THE FARM. 



By R. L. HILL, Columbia, Mo. 




R. L. HILL 



[Written for the Breeder and Sportsman.] 
Country buyers, commission men and shippers tell 
me they have noticed more good cattle, hogs and 
sheep going to market the last twelve months than 
ever before in their recollections, and when asked 
the reason for this most of these men were unani- 
mous in the opinion that 
it was the result of the 
educational campaigns 
conducted by agricultural 
colleges and experiment 
stations, the agricultural 
press and the breeding as- 
sociations. 

For years from various 
sources pressure has been 
brought to bear on the 
thinking breeders and 
feeders to remind them 
that it pays to use pure- 
bred sires of any kind, that 
there is always an in 
creased price to accom- 
pany well bred stock, ^and 
that the demand is always 
better for the better grades of any kind of live stock. 
While there are no separate classifications for pure- 
bred or for high-grade stock on the market, there 
is a cash value difference. 

The market toppers are the easy-feeding, quick- 
maturing kind, uniform in size and conformation, 
and usually well-bred, or at least the get of a pure- 
bred sire. 

I mention the above to impress upon those who 
are not using pure-bred sires to give the matter con- 
sideration this coming year. The winter months 
furnish an excellent opportunity to plan for another 
twelve months, and in that planning, get the avail- 
able literature bearing on the subjects of pure-bred 
sires for raising market stock and study carefully 
the figures and facts there given. Begin the new 
year as it should be started, with a balancing of 
books so far as possible, and with a little retrospec- 
tion, not for the purpose of finding errors to mourn 
over, but for the sake of drawing lessons from past 
experience for future guidance. Consider well the 
class of stock handled in the past, and what could 
have been done in the way of improvement with the 
small outlay of expense attached to a pure-bred sire. 

There is a man in every community who has a 
reputation as a good feeder — not only of cattle, but 
of hogs as well, and he usually tops the market with 
the stuff he feeds. Sometimes this man breeds the 
animals he feeds, and in other cases he buys them. 
This man is making money and is looked upon as a 



have everything on the place pure-bred, but it is im- 
portant to have very high grades, because it has been 
conclusively shown that high grades will make a 
profit when common stock will not. When common 
stock will make a profit, plenty of good blood will 
make a better one. 

There has been remarkable improvement in the 
stock that is being fed for market. Many farmers 
have for years been improving their herds and flocks. 
There is a vast number of men who won't use any- 
thing else but a pure-bred sire, and a good one. These 
men introduce new blood into their herds from time 
to time, and by that means seek to grade up. These 
men know the kind of a sire they want to mate with 
their females, having studied the matter. When 
these men find out the profitable kind they know 
what they want, hunt up the man who has that kind 
to sell and then they buy him — not buying something 
else just as good but a good deal cheaper, but the 
kind they want and need, and they don't dicker too 
much about tlie price. It is necessary to buy a new 
male often enough to avoid in-breeding and conse- 
quent weakness and lack of vigor, and to buy a male 
of the same breeding as the females, and keep the 
herd improving. Once a good sire is secured, it is 
good business to keep him as long as he can be used 
without in-breeding. A good, tried sire, one that can 
be depended upon, should be kept in the herd as long 
as possible. It is not necessary to spend a whole 
lot of money to improve a grade herd. Males can be 
purchased very reasonably. Most breeders are will- 
ing to sell males so that they can make a profit on 
the individual and still let the buyer get a profitable 
investment. 

Don't make the mistake of going into any pure- 
bred business on an extensive scale right on the 
jump. There are a large number of men who are 
constantly on the lookout for easy ways to make a 
living, and a good many of them who read so much 
bunk about how the old sow or the old cow makes 
men fortunes turn to the live stock business, and in 
most cases do themselves and the breed they handle 
an injustice. The vague impression which seems to 
prevail among those who know little about it, that 
the sow or the cow does all the work and the owner 
doesn't have much of anything to do but gather in 
the dollars, is unwarranted. To an industrious, en- 
terprising man, content to begin in a small way, we 
believe the pure-bred business affords as good oppor- 
tunities for making money in proportion to the cap- 
ital invested as any other in sight, but it is after all 
a question of man and management, and the pure- 
bred business is especially one in which one must 
creep before he attempts to walk. He must learn to 
be faithful over a few things before he trusts him- 
self with the control of many. Given enough capital, 
the righ* kind of animals, enough feed and a good 
feeder, it is not difficult to produce good animals and 
mature them to good individuals, but there is another 
end to the pure-bred business ,and that is the selling 




R. L. Hill's Herd Boar, Winner of Duroc-Jersey Championship Missouri State Fair 1913 



good farmer and feeder. Somehow or other, his 
neighbors say, he can put more pounds of meat on 
his fattening stock with less grain than they can, 
and they wonder at this. They also say that he can 
get his stuff ready for market quicker than anybody 
they ever saw, and they cannot account for this. 

This good feeder himself tells you the reason in 
a few words. He won't feed anything but well-bred 
stock, the easy-feeding kind, the kind that put on a 
gain with the least amount of grain, the kind that 
mature rapidly and get ready for the market in the 
shortest possible time. If this feeder buys on the 
market ,you will find him giving instructions to his 
commission man to buy for him nothing but the best 
to feed, and if he buys his feeders locally, he buys 
stock from the neighbors who are using pure-bred 
boars or bulls on pure-bred or high-grade sows or 
cows. He has found that it is unprofitable to try to 
feed common stock of any kind and expect to make 
money. But his neighbors can't realize it. This is 
not due to ignorance, but just to lack of study and 
thought. 

There are just too many farmers who don't care 
what kind of a boar serves their sow, or what kind 
of a bull serves their cow, just so the animal gets 
settled. It is not necessary, for market purpftses, to 



end. Many men can produce, but they can't sell. 

But to discuss the pure-bred business would take 
many books. I started out to say th%t \^ in essential 
to use pure-bred sires on the farms of [he corn belt, 
or anywhere else. A farmer should not be content 
with just getting a living from his fftnn, he should 
be making money on it, and if he expects to make 
money on the live-stock he feeds he iJlUdt have good 
stock, and one of the quickest ways tO get the good 
kind is to use a pure-bred sire on the grade female 
stuff which he now owns. In your plans for 1917, 
set aside a sufficient amount of time an4 money and 
invest in a pure-bred sire for the kind Of stock you 
are intending to breed and feed. 



At a sale of big drafters held in New York last 
week prices for individual horses ranged from $165 
to $385, and for teams from $460 to $850. Trucks 
and harness also brought good prices, some of the 
trucks making $350 and the harness selling as high 
as $115 per set. The outfits were consigned by a 
trucking firm going out of business. 

* ❖ ♦ 

Atlanta, Georgia, which had its first harness race 
meeting last fall, reports a total attendance of 166,000 
for the six days, an average of 27,600 for each day. 



Saturday, January 20, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



THE BEST LINIMENT 

OR PAIN KILLER FOR THE HUMAN BOnf 

^ Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 

IT HAS NO EQLIAL 

Peiiactly Sala 
and 

Rallabls Rsmedy 
lor 

Sore Throa: 
Chest Cold 
Backache 



r-_ -It iipcn.tr.l 
rUI Inj.soolliiog snJ 
h»nn(, and for >]1 U\J 
fha Sor.i, Bruiie.,o, 
ins Woiindi. Faluni 
Exterior Cancan, Bcili 

Human "B?.'„"o'r 

ClUSTIC BiLSlM hai 
no eqiiftl ai 



Body 



LlD 



We would say to all 
who buy it that it does 
nit contain a particle 
of poisonous substance 
and therefore no harm 
can result from its ei- 
lernal use. Persistent 
thorough use will cure 
many old or chronic 
ailments and it can be 
used on any case that 
requires an outward 
application with 
perfect safety. 



Neuralgia 
Sprains 
Strains 
Lumbago 
Diphtheria 
Sore Lungs 
Rheumatism 
and 
all StiH Joints 



REMOVES THE SORENESS -STRENGTHENS K/IUSCLES 
Corobill. Tel.— "On© bottle Cauatio Balsam did 

my rheumetiflm more food then $rJO Ou pnid in 

doclor-lbill. •• OTTO A BEVKR. 

Price • I .SO per bottle. Sold by druggisti. c at 

bf Of expren prepeid. Write (or Booklet R. 

The UWRENCE-WILLIAMS COMPANY. Clevelai.ir. I. 



FOR SALE 

Shorthorn Cattle 

and 

Saddle Horses 

The most attractive 
representatives of the most 
celebrated families 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 
Reasonable Prices 

MUST SELLa 

Jump Cauthorn 

G. 0. BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

p. O. BOX 447 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



EL DORADO 

COCOANUT OIL MEAl 

FOR HORSES, MILK COWS, CHICKENS, 
YOUNG PIGS AND HOGS 

If Your Dealer Doesn't Carry It. Address 

EL DORADO OIL WORKS 

433 California Street, San Francisco 

CLINDAUER Its to 160 Clara SI. 
a San Francisco, Cal. 

General Livery and Sale Business 

COUNTRY HORSES FOR SALE 

WEIGHING 1200 Lbs. TO 1700 Lbs. 

Mul«8 In Carload Lots 

Hortti ind Hlfs of All Detcrlptloni for Hire at All Times 



GOOSE SHOOTING!! 



-ON- 



CHURCH-HANSON 

Famous Goose Preserve 

Near Rio Vista 



THE BEST GOOSE CALLERS IN THE 
STATE 
and a large number of 
LIVE GEESE DECOYS ALWAYS 
On Hand, Assure 
THE SPORTSMAN A GOOD SHOOT. 

FDR PARTICULARS and RESERVATION PHONE OR WRITE; 




W. Gordon Wagner 

PROPRIETOR 

HOTEL RIO VISTA 
Rio Vista — California 

Convenience- 
Train Schedules 
Fast Service 
fS^\ Clean comfortable riding 
Observation car service 
Courteous employes 
Electrically heated cars 
Modern steel coaches. 

Between San Francisco 

AN'D POINTS IN THE 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY 

On the "San Francisco-Sacramento Scenic Line" 
and Northern Electric Ry. 

Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Ry. 

SAN FRANCISCO DEPOT FERRY BUILDING 
PHOI^IE SUTTER 2339. 

TELEPHONE KENNELS 

530 FULTON ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

Tel. Markat 2074. 

Dogs and pups of all breeds for sale. 
Dogs boarded under sanitary condi- 
tions. Special care of bitches in whelp 
and puppies. Dogs clipped and baths 
carefully given. Positively no sick 
dogs accepted. 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

Proprietor. 

HEALD'S 
BUSINESS COLLEGE 

trains for business 
and places its graduates 
in position 

1215 VAN NESS AVENUE 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

BLAKE MOFFIT 6 TOWNE 



PAPER 



DEALERS 
IN 

I7-Iat St., San Franolaoo, Cal. 

niaka, IfcFall * Co., Portland, Or*. 
Ulak*. Ifofflt and Town*. L.oe .^nirf*** 



Buy A McMurray! 




The Real Lady (2) t. 2:0VA. 
world's champion two-year-old, 
established two new world's rec- 
ords the first time hitched to the 
New McMurray Sulky. 

Every race record of two minutes 
or better in 1916 was made to 
the new McMurray Sulky. 

The Golden Anniversary Catalogue 
shows the complete line of Mc- 
Murray "Easy Riding" Jog 
Carts in which horse action is 
absorbed Into the springs — The 
Model 80 "Flyer," the last word 
in a training cart — The New 
Model 44 "Featherweight" Racer 
for racing, training or Matinee 
driving, and is gladly mailed 
free. 

Remember, McMurrays build Sul- 
kies and Carts exclusively. Their 
mechanics are specially trained, 
and by devoting their entire time 
to one line, are better able to 
furnish a first quality article at 
lowest cost. 

Let McMurrays tell you what they 
can do for you. 

The McIVIurray Sulky Company 
288 N. Main Ste, Marion. Ohio 



*'WATCH-IT-CET-EM*' 

POSITIVELY DESTROYS 

ANTS, COCKROACHES, BED-BUGS, 
FLIES and CHICKEN LICE 

MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

Used Extensively by Railroads, Steamship 
Co.'s, Hospitals, Leading Hotels, Res- 
taurants, Cafes, Etc. 
Gets Ihe Nest as Well as the Parent 

NON POISONOUS— DOES NOT LOSE STRENGTH 
ASK YOUR DEALER SEND 6c IN STAMPS FOR TRIAL CAN 

"Watch-It-Get-Em" Coe, 

Ol^ CALIFORNIA 
Nos. 19 to 25 Minna St., San Francisco 

ALL CUTS 
IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PHOTO -ENGRAVING CO. 

215 LEIDESDORFF ST., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Douglas 1810 
Wm .F. EG AN. V.M.R.C.S. 

VETERINARY SURGEON 
1155 Golden Gate Avenue 
Branob Hoaplta.1, corner Wabatar and 
Chestnut Streets. 

San Francisco, California 




HORSE 
EALTH 



IT THOROi;CHLV CLEANS. TONES and STRENGTH. 
ENS EVERY ORGAN OF THE STOMACH AND SYS- 
TEM AND THERE IS NEVER A REACTION AFTER 
THE TREATMENT 

;rti. 50c. •-<» «B.oo ".:'i'.*-V',.VpV,o" 

HORSE-HEALTH CO., Norwalk, Conn., U.S. A. 



xAm. h^-iM. ;>«C^ "Tn^AMt^ 

Tlie liglit remedy U^x ^^Ai-icAJL 
building up horwea run ■^ul.^I>^:, 
down bec^auKC of iiuiiges- 
tion, kidney or blood (Hh- 
oriler and expels stoinach 
worms like magic. 

5c & 95 



1 wo 

SI/.E.S 



J, DAVID WEST 

p.acii-k; (oa.'^t .\(;ent 
J018 FILLMORE ST., 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 





THICK, SWOLLEN GLANDS 

that make a horse Wheeze, 
Roar, have Thick Wind 
or C^hoke-down, can l)e 
reduced with 



^BSORBI 



aUo other Huiu hcs or Swellings. Noblister, 
no hair gone, and horse kept at work. Eco- 
nomical — only a few drops required at an ap- 
plication. $2 per bottle delivered. Book 3 M Iree. 
ABSORBINE, JR., the antiseptic liniment for 
mankind, reduces Cysts, Wens, Painfid, 
Swollen Veins and Ulcers. $1 and S2 a bottle at 
dealers or delivered. Book "Evidence" free. 
W. F. YOUNG, P.D.F., 5 ) Temple St., Springfield, Mass. 

For ule by Lingley ft MlchMU, San Fr»ncucc., o»Uf ; 
Woodwiu-d, Clark 4 Co , PortUnd. Ore : C»l Dmg A Ohem 
Co , Brumwlg Prus Co . WeeUrn Whole«»le Drug Co Loi 
ABg'l"*! C»IU Kirk. Cleary 4 Co.. Sacramento, Oallf ; 
Pacific Drug. Co.. Seattle. Waih.; Spokane Drug Co.. Bpc 
kane. Waeh.: Cf-ffln. Rediogton Co.. San Franciico. 6'al /" 



lassified Advertising 



WANTED. 

Po.sition as trainer by a thoroughly 
competent man of good habits. Has 
trained and raced hor.ses on the eastern 
circuit and in California. Can furnish 
high-class reconunendations and refer- 
ences. Address TRAINER, Box 212, 
Pleasanton, Cal. 

FOR SALE 
BELGIAN STALLION, registered, 
weighs 19.50, 8 years old. A high class 
horse in every respect; sound and hand- 
some. Sires high-class colts. Will sell 
cheap for quick .sale. 
Address 

A. L. WATSON, 
Patterson, Stanislaus Co., Cal. 

LIVE STOCK INSURANCE: Registered 
live stoclt and farm work horses should 
be insured. The Hartford Company, 
strongest in the world writing live stock. 
No trouble to answer questions. D. O. 
Lively, special representative, 215 Ho- 
bart Tilda-, San Francisco. 
AT LAST THE PERFECT SILO— THE 
STAY ROUND: No hoops. No bolts. No 
experiments. Any one can erect. Close 
price. Address D. O. Lively, 215 Hobart 
BIdg., San Franci.sco. 

THOROUCHBRED STALLION FOR SALI 

Hrown, six years old. sired by Orsini. dam 
Leta Trix by Brutus, sound. Bred by J. J. 
Moore. Addres.s JAME.S LAYNE, 

26 S. River Street. San Jose. Cal. 



FOR SALE— THE ICICLE by The Ice- 
man 2:10, dam California by a son of 
Sable Wilkes, next dam thoroughbred. 
Handsome( dark bay horse with black 
mane and tail, star, and both hind pas- 
terns white. A remarkably showy horse, 
weighs 1000 pounds, stands 15% hands 
high and can show five gaits under sad- 
dle. Has trotted a mile in 2:16%, last 
quarter in 32i/2 seconds; trotted a half In 
1:04'/^. Kind disposition and intelligent. 
One of the most desirable horses to ride, 
drive, or show, in California. Will be 
sold cheap. Address 

A. T. JACKSON, 

R. 4, Box 11, Stockton, Cal. 



I WANT TO BUY.— I have sold eleven 
horses in the last few months ranging 
from $2,000 to $200. If you have a horse 
for sale and will write me, I will tell you 
what my system is. It is a winner. I find 
there is a buyer for every horse for sala 
at the right price. It Is just a question of 
getting the buyer and seller together. If 
you have one for sale let me hear from 
you. MAGNUS FLAWS. 

542 S. Dearborn St.. Chicago. III. 

..Modern Horse Management.. 

By 

CAPTAIN R. S. TIMMIS 
Nearly 500 photographs and drawlnga. 
144 Plates 11x8. Royal quarto, 316 
pages. Cassell &. Co.: London, To- 
ronto, Melbourne, etc. Stokes & Co.: 
New York. $5 postpaid. 
"A most valuable authority." — Sporting 

and Dramatic News, London. 
"Very sound and well thought out." — The 
Field. 

"A book that should be widely known." — 
Horse and Hound. 

"The fruits of a tree whose roots are 
grounded in practical experience." — 
Bloodstock Breeders' Review. 

"Worthy to take Its place as a standard 
work." — Sporting Lite. 

"A valuable addition to the horse library" 
—Irish Field. 

"Should be In the possession of every 
horse owner." — The Broad Arrow. 

"Should strike a popular note." — New 
York Spur. 

"The fruit of practical experience." — Chi- 
cago Horse Review. 

"On a scale not heretofore attempted by 
a writer." — Horse World, Buffalo. 

"Deserves the widest possible apprecia- 
tion." — Farm Life, London. 
For sale by 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN, 
P. O. Drawer 447, San Franclace 



u 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 20, 1917 



BEAUTIFUL BELVEDERE 



LOTS FOR SALE 



CORINTHIAN ISLAND bubdivision to Belvedere is the 
most beautiful spot on the shores of San Francisco Bay 
for a suburban home. It commands an extensive view of 

ic, the City of San Francisco, Alcatraz and Angel Islands, 
( Raccoon Straits, San Francisco Baj', Richardson's Bay, 
V the Berkeley shore, beautiful Belvedere and Mt. Tamal- 
I pais. It is in Marin County, directly opposite San Fran- 
f cisco, and forms the eastern shore of Belvedere cove. 
I It has a naturally terraced, sunny, western slope that is 
well adapted for many choice residence sites, every one 
affording most picturesque views of the bay and moun- 
tain. It is protected from the prevailing western trade winds in 
summer by Belvedere Island, and from the southerly storms in 
winter by Angel Island. The soil is fertile and part of the island 
is well wooded. 

It is less subject to fog th.an any other place near San 
Francisco. The summer fog, as it rolls in from the ocean, splits 
on the western slope of Sausalito, part of it flowing in a line with 
Angel Island towards the Berkeley shore, and part of it along 
the southern slope of Mt. Tanialpais, leaving Belvedere, Corin- 
thian Island and Raccoon Straits in the bright sunlight, while 
the fog banks can be seen as a white wall both to the north and 
the south. 

There is very little available land about the shores of San 
Francisco Bay that is desirable for homes, especially for those 
who love boating and kindred sports. The Alameda and Contra 
Costa shores of the bay are the lee shores and receive the full 
brunt of the boisterous trade winds which lash the shoal waters 
near the land into muddy waves, making boating both unpleas- 
ant and dangerous. To the north of the city and in Marin 
County the land from Sausalito to the entrance of the bay is a 
Government reservation and will never be placed on the market. 
The shores of Richardson's Bay are not at present convenient 
to boat service and, aside from Belvedere and Corinthian Island, 
there is little or no land near any ferry landing that possesses 
the natural advantages, improvements and possibilities that are 
offered on Corinthian Island. Concrete roads, pure water, tele- 
phone service and electric light wires are already installed. It is 
only ten minutes' walk from any point on the property to 
Tiburon boats, and but forty-three minutes' ride to the foot of 
Market Street. 

On the point of Corinthian Island the Corinthian Yacht 
Club has had its home for many years, and on any summer day 
the white sails of its numerous fleet add to the charming scene, 
as the trim yachts glide about tbe cove. Excellent fishing of all 
kinds for bay fish, including salmon, the gamey striped bass, 
rock fish and the toothsome silver smelt, is to be had in the cove. 
There is probably no spot so accessible and in such close prox- 
imity to any large city in the world that offers the attractions 
of climate, magnificent scenery, fishing and boating as will here 
be found. 



FOR MAPS, PRICES AND PARTICULARS APPLY TO 



S. L. PLANT, 

PLANT RUBBER AND SUPPLY CO., 

32 BEALE STREET 

San Francisco, CaL 



6"R. 



F. W. KELLEY, 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN OFFICE, 

366 PACIFIC BUILDING 

San E^rancisco, Cal. 



Saturday, Janoiary 20, 1917] 



THE BREEDER A 



ND SPORTSMAN 



15 




SAVE-TiTe-HORSE Will Cute If! 

(Trade-Mark, RctrisU-rcd) 

OVER 200,UU0 cases of lameness successfull}^ treated with 
Save-The-Horse. It is a hy-word now among noted 
horsemen and breeders that Save-Tne-Horse is a prompt- 
acting, sure-cure remed}' for liingbone — Tliorojiin — SPAVIN 
or Any Shoulder, Knee, Ankle, Hoof or Tcivlon D\<r;\'r. no 
matter how old, serious or complicated. 

NO BLISTERING. HORSE WORKS AS USUAL. 

That is why we sell Save-The-Horse with Siu;ned CoiUract-Boud to return 
money if remedy fails. Write for copy of this contract and unquestioned proof! 
bur FREE 96-page BOOK makes it possible for you to dia.^noKe and 
treat cases, and our free expert veterinary 's advice is here to help 
you if you are not sure. Don't run the risk of having horse laid up 
when you need him most. Keep a bottle of Save-The-Horse on hand, 
and be prepared for any em('rgency. Write today for copy of Con- 
tracr. BOOK and Advice— all Free. Tie prepared! 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., Binghamton, N. Y. 

r. E. NEWELL, Agent, 80 Bayo Vista Ave., OAKLAND, CAL. 

$5 a bottle. Druggists Everywhere Sell Save-the- Horse with Contract, or we send by 
Parcel Post or Express paid. 



Anse! M. 



William Ward 
IMPORTERS m BREEDERS 
of Prize Winning 

SHIRE HORSES 



Blackhawk Stock Ranch 

Barns full of top notch two to five year old Stallions 
IMPORTED AND HOME BRED 

With weight, style, and ciuality. heavy clean bone and the be.<=t ■ 
mend them. Show hor.ses and piiza winners. C.reat npportunity i 

BLACKHAWK STOCK ri/v.\JGH, 



.".tallion. 
Telephone Burlingame 131 



Burlingame, Cal. 



Shoeing; and Balancing 

___ qtfe ======= 

Light Harness liorse 

BY JAMES CLARK 

A COPY of this book should be in every liorse 
owner's library. It treats the subject in a way 
that you can understand, giving accurate and re- 
liable information that every owner of a good 
horse will find extremely helpful in the care of 
his horse's feet. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS: 



The Treatment of the Colt's 
Feet Before Shoeing. 

The Fir&t Set of Shoes. 

Sore Feet and Sour Disposi- 
tion. 

Knee-hitting, Scalping, Etc, 
Pads, their Benefits and 

Abuses. 
Thrush, its cause, treatment 
Punctures. 

Quarter and Toe Cracks. 
Hoof Bound. 
Hitting the Elbows. 

ORDER YOUR 



m 



Navicular Trouble. 
Heavy Shoes and Pads 

the Winter Season. 
Neglected Teeth Make Knee 

hitters and Cross Firers. 
Making the Shoes. 
Extension Shoes. 
Outside or ^-swedged Shoes. 
Swedges or Dies. 
Calks and Grabs. 
B;ir Shoes Behind. 
Aluminum Shoes. 
The Last Word. 

COPY NOW 



PRICE 



POSTPm 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

DRAWER 447, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



o Be Sure You're Shooting a 




SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDER 

DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
OR SCHULTZE 

Should Be on Case, Carton 
and the Top Shot Wad 

There is prevalent among shooters some con- 
fusion concerning Du Pont brands of smokeless 
shotgun powders; DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
and SCHULTZE are the Smokeless Shotgun 
Powders manufactured b}- the DuPont Company 

Look at the Top Shot Wad 

—if it reads DUPONT, BALLISTITE or SCHULTZE 
you have the Du Pont Company's powder in your 
shot shells. 

.\sk for DUPONT, BALLISTITE or SCHULTZE at 
your dealer's or club when buying loaded shells. 

For booklets giving loads for trap and game shooting, 
or any information about sporting powders, write to 

£. ;. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 

WILMINGTON. DELAWARE 

BRANCHES: SAN FRANCISCO. SEATTLE end DENVER 



The First National Bank 

of San Francisco 

— Invites the banking business of 
those desiring the best SERVICE. 
We have the will to render it, 

I I 

; the system to insure it. 

, CAPITU AND SURPLUS $4,500,000. 



Horses Will Die- 

Snme with the other classes of livestock. 

Their value when dead is equal only to the amount 

of insurance by which they are protected. 

Let's talk it over. 

Montana livestock & Casualty Insurance Co. 

DOUGLAS KEITH, General Agent Northern Califor- 
nia, 701 Royal Insurance BIdg., San Francisco. 

W. H. MILLER, General Agent Southern California, 
505 Lankershim BIdg., Los Angeles. 



TAllION CARDS 



Send for Our 
SAMPLES and 
CATALOG ol 
Horse Cuts ' 
Horse Bookv' ' 
Impregnators, Supports, 
Serving Hobble* 
Remedies 

ETcryilimg a Siatlioa 
Owner Needs 



Our Stallion Folders, 
Posters, Sale and 
Farm Catalogs 
Compiled and Printed 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ cheaper than you can gel 

the printing alone. 

Send for samples and prices. Our Stallion Service 
Books are the cheapest and best. 



Tabulated Pedigrees 



We make afive-tenera- 
tion pcditfree (blood 
lines ooly) tor $1. A 
four'tfeneralioB tabula- 
lioa with aacettor't record pro^eoy for $2; [ive-ieneratioDs lor 
$3— all on a blaok 14x17. A haodiome Eive-tfeoeration tabula- 
lioD, 16x20, printed in two-colori for Iramiotf, for $6, two copies 
for $6.50 or five for $7. Address 

Magnus Flaws & Co., 542 S. Dearborn St., Chicago, UL 



1 



THE WISE SPORTSMAN'S NEW YEAR RESOLUTION! 

Use the (g) Brand Shells and Cartridges 

1; Wherever ammunition Is used the name of "Peters" is synonymous with QUALITY. The high standards used In the production of these goods guarantee 
that every lot of shells or cartridges shipped under our labels embodies all the essentials of perfect ammunition, such as accuracy, penetration, uniformity 
and general reliability. 

^1 In the last analysis, successful performance is the most conclusive evidence of quality, and during the year 1916, the exceptional shooting proficiency of 
Peters shells has again been demonstrated. 

Mr. Rolla O. Heikes, a veteran of more than 25 years' experience in trapshooting, began using Peters shells a iittle over a year ago and his Official Average 

for 1916, 96.24";,;, exceeds by several per cent the best average he ever made with other makes of shells. 

Similarly Mr. W. R. Crosby, another man with country-wide fame among trapshooters and sportsmen of all classes, averaged in 1916 96.79%, using 
Peters shells exclusively and exceeding any yearly average he has ever made on a similar or greater number of targets when using other brands of ammu- 
nition. 

Add 10 this the achievement of Mr. Woolfolk Henderson in winning the Official High Amateur Average in 1914, 96.63%, and in 1915, 97.53%, and Second 
Amateur honors in 1916, 97.14%, and you have evidence enough to convince the most skeptical that Peters shells are a real contributor to the making of 
high scores. /'KN 

The amateur shooter who heeds the handwriting on the wall and decides to use the ( IJ 1 brand shells In 1917 is sure to make Ihe best scores of which 

the shooting fraternity our best wishes for the Ne>Af Year, including "100%" happiness and a "straight 
run" of 365 prosperous days. 



he is capable. 
llWe extend to the members of 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO.. 



PACiriC COAST 
BRANCH .... 



585-587 Howard Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




WIMCHESTER 

Nickel Steel Repeaters, Extra Light 

Nickel Steel, which has about twice the tensile strength of the steel commonly used 
in guns, is utilized entirely in the construction of the Winchester Model 1912 re- 
peating shotgun; and, consequently, it is tne lightest and strongest repeater on the 
market. It is also considered the handsomest. It is made in 12, 16 and 20 gauges, and 
although on the market but a short time, is now the biggest selling repeater. Get one. 

Use "W tN C H £5T S K "Leader" or "Repeater" shells in Winchester guns, and 
in guns of any make, as on account of their patented construction and uniform 
loading they always give the best results. Winchester shells were used by the winner 
of the Grand American Handicap. 





WIN NEW REVOLVER AND PISTOL 

SHOOTING HONORS WITH 




Dr. Atkinson's Winning Revolver 
Target, 50-Shot Score, 469 

JJ,,f,|.U, l , i JA 



TARGET SMOKELESS 



A new revolver shooting record is the result of the Annual Outdoor 
Pistol and Revolver Championship Contests just completed by the United 
States Revolver Association. 

Dr. A. B. Atkinson, West View, Pa., made a match record of 469, which 
gives him the Outdoor Revolver Championship of the United States. 
Dr. Atkinson shoots and prefers Remington UMC. 

The pistol championship was won by that master marksman, George 
Armstrong of San Francisco, with a score of 474. Mr. Armstrong uses 
Remington UMC .22 Long Rifle Lesmok cartridges for all of his shooting. 

For either practice or championship shooting you may rely upon 
Remington UMC metallics to give the maximum accuracy. 

The Remington Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Company, Inc. 

Woolworth Building New York City 




Mr. Armstrong's Winning Pistol 
Target, 50-Shot Score, 474 



^mSJ gBjaaa H^h^ 




Championship of California!!! 

PACIFIC COAST HANDICAP 1915 

HIGHEST GENERAL AVERAGE, VERNON GUN CLUB, 
Los Ang«l*s, July 2, 3 and 4, 1S16 

493 ex 500 TARGETS 

All of the above winnings were made by Mr. Henry Ffirrmann Jr., with hie 34 inch 
double barrel 

PARKER GUN 

HiKheet Official General Average for 1914 and 1915 was made with the 

PARKER GUN 

If Intareited In amaU bore runs write for Initructlye booklet which will b« aent fra* 
on raquaat. For further partlcxilara recardinK runa from i to It gauee, aildraaa 
rARKKH BROS., Marldan, Conn. Naw York Salaaroom, U Warran ttraatt 

ar A. W. duBray, Raalding Agant, San *^r<nelaeo, p. O. Box 1M 



—TRAINING THE HOUND— 

A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE TRAINING OF FOX HOUNDS, BEAGLES, 

AND COON HOUNDS. 

The system of training advocated is simple and effective, so that anyone who car- 
ries out instructions can easily develop a foxhound, a beagle or a coon dog to the 
highest state of usefulness or organize a pack in which each hound will work independ- 
ently and at the same time harmoniously with the others. The subjects are: The 
Hound's Ancestry. History, Instinctive Tendencies, English and Native Hounds. Deve - 
oping the Intelligence. Training the Foxhound, Voices and Pace of the Hound. Quali- 
ties of Scent. Manners, Training the Coon Dog, Coon Hunting, Training the Beagle, 
Forming a Pack, Field Trial Handling, Faults and Vices, Conditionmg, Selecting and 
Rearing Puppies. Kennels and Yards, Diseases of Hounds and Their Treatment. The 
chapters on field trial training and handling are alone worth the price of the book, 
which is one that every man who loves the voice of a hound should read. 

The book contains 224 pages, is clearly printed, nicely bound, and handsomely Illus- 
trated with bloodhounds, various types of English and American foxhounds, beagles 
and cross-bred dogs for 'possum and coon hunting. 

Price, In heavy paper cover, $1; $1.50, poatpald. 



ADDRESS: 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

p. O. ORAWKR 447, SAN FRANCISCO, CAU 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1917 



Pleasanton Driving Park 

PLEASANTON. CALIFORNIA 

offers for service for the season of 1917 the following stallions: 

THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4 

Fastest trotting stallion ever offered for service in California 
and fifth fastest entire trotter in the world 

Son of Si. Valiant Vincent 2:11% (by St. Vincent 2:13% out of the triple 
.producer Grace Lee 2:29^4 by Electioneer 125); dam Amy Smith by Emperor 
Wilkes 2:20%, sire of Princess Bulalia (4) 2:09Vi. etc.; grandam by Hamble- 
tonlan 5.19. 

The Anvil is regarded by Edward F. Geers as one of the very greatest trot- 
ters that he has ever raced. For five years the pair of Tennesseeans went to 
the races together smd In that time were but twice unplaced, while winining a 
total of tiftecn races, including the historic M. and M. 

As an individual he is most pleasing, not too large or coarse In any way but 
smootlily and compactly made and "all horse" in every line. He is a perfect 
headed, pure gaited trotter, with the very best of disposition, and is destined 
to become a very great sire of trotting speed. His opportunities In the stud 
have been very slight as he has been retired from racing only since the close 
of 1914. He was selected to head the stud at Pleasanton Driving Park not only 
on account of his great qualities as a race trotter, but because one of his first 
foals, Anvilite (2) 2:22Vi. with a trial of ten seconds or more faster, was In 
every way the greatest colt trotter ever handled by C. L. DcRyder. The services 
of The Anvil are recommended to you without reserve. 

Fee for THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4, $50 with usual privilege 

Vernon McKinney 2:01 1-2 

Fastest member of the great family of McKinney 2:11 |/i 
Sire of VERNA McKINNEY (2) 2:13 (his first foal raced), fastest two- 
year-old pacing filly of 1915, three-year-old record, 1916, 2:09|4; 
VERNON DIABLO, mat. rec. half mile track 2:Uy^, and DR. DYER 
(3) trial 2:1214. 

tSon of Guy McKinney 37625 (by McKinney 2:11% out of Flossie Drais by Guy 
Wilkes 2:15Vi); dam Maud Vernon by Mount Vernon 2:15%, sire of the dams of 
Leata J. 2:03, etc.; grandam Mag by General McCIellan, sire of the dams of 
Mack Mack 2:08, etc. 

Vernon McKinney'5 racing career was not an extensive one but will long be 
remembered for the excellence of his performances, as his winnings include a 
Chamber of Commerce stake in time very near the record for that event at the 
time, and he is the fastest of all the McKinneys. 

He is a horse of rare qualities in the way of individual excellence, almost 
ideal in behavior and temperament in harness or out. Since his retirement he 
has been a popular horse in the stud and our claim that he would prove a very 
great sire of pacing speed has been fully substantiated, his first foal to be raced 
being the season champion for the age and gait in 1915, a most excellent testi- 
monial to his potency. He is a very sure breeder, his get are uniformly endowed 
with natural speed and the physical Jind mental requirements of modern race 
horses and find ready sale at most gratifying prices. 

Fee for VERNON McKINNEY 2:01 1-2. $50 with usual privilege. 

The best of cara taken of mares in any manner owners may desire, but no 
responsibility assumed for accidents or escapes. Address for particulars 



GEORGE F. RYAN, Superintendent, 



PLEASANTON, CAL. 



Thoroughbred sire M ARSE ABE 

WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1917 AT 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK 



Service Fee $50 



Marse Abe carries the best 
blood of America through his 
sire lines. Yankee was a su- 
perior race horse and sire. Han- 
over was the best horse of his 
day, and headed the list of win- 
ning sires for years. No refer- 
ence Is necessary to Hindoo as 
everyone knows what he was. 
Halo, the dam of Marse Abe, 
is bred just right to cross with 
the sire blood in his pedigree; 
a daughter of St. Blaise, son of 
Hennit, the most fa.shionable 
sire line In England, and backed 
up on her dam's side by the 
lines of long distance perform- 
ers from which sprung Ten 
Brock and other four-mllers. 

Address all communications to 



"'"Ooo \V^L 



U i Yankee , 
CQ I 
< I I 

U 
(A 
U 
< 

S I Halo. 



Hanover ^ ' Florence 

( Bourbon Belle. \ gp,°"'f Scotland 
f Ella D. 

„ ( Hlmyar j A'a""™ 

Correction. ' \ Ilira 

(jlannie Gray... j 

I Lizzie G . 

( ITermit / Newmlnster 

St. Hlaise... J 1 Seclusion 

I Fusee j Mars.v.a3 

( \ esuvienne 

(King Alfonso... 



Ida K.. 



■ \ Ca pi tola 

/Lerna | Asteroid 

I Laan 



GEO. F. RYAN, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 



DILLCARA 57462 



Sop of Sidney Dillon 23157 (sire of 9 in 2:10 list) and Guycara by Guy Wilkes 
28^7 (sire of 3 in 2:10 list), will make the season of 1917 at 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK, PLEASANTON, CAL. 

SERVICE FEE $50 TO INSURE 

Dillcara is a full brother to Harold Dillon 39610, the leading sire of New Zealand. 
Last season the get of Harold Dillon won 41 races, totalling over f 25,000. 
' Address all communications to 

GEO. F. RYAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



Anse! M. Easlon 



William Ward 
IMPORTERS m BREEDERS 
of Prize Winning 

SHIRL HORSES 



Blackhawk Stock Ranch 

Barns full of top notch two to five year old Stallions 

IMPORTED AND HOME BRED 

With weight, style, and quality, heavy clean bone and the best of breeding to recom- 
mend them. Show horses and prize winners, dreat opportunity to secure a top-notch 
.ntalHon. BLACKHAWK STOCK RANCH, 

Telephone Burllngame 131 Burllngame, Cal. 



$10 Due on Two-Vear-Olds 

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1st. 1917 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stake No. 15.-"S5,150 

GIVEN BY THE PACIFIC COAST TROTTING HORSE BREEDERS ASSOCIATION 

FOR FOALS OF MARES BRED IN 1914 
FOR FOALS OF 1915 TO TROT OR PACE AT TWO AND 
THREE YEARS OLD 
$2800 FOR TROTTING FOALS $250 TO OWNERS OF STALLIONS 

$1800 FOR PACING FOALS $300 TO NOMINATORS OF DAMS OF WINNERS 

MONEY DIVIDED AS FOLLOWS: 



$2100 for Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

100 to the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry Is named the 
Winner of the Three-Year-Old Trot. 
800 for Two-Year-Old Trotters. 
50 to the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry Is named 
the Winner of the Two-Year-Old 
Trot. 

50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner 
of Three-Year-Old Trot when mare 
was bred. 



$1200 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

100 10 the Nominator of the Dam on 
whose Original Entry Is named the 
Winner of the Three-Year-Old 
Pace. 

500 for Two-Year-Old Pacers. 
50 to the Nominator of the Dam on 

whose Original Entry Is named the 

Winner of the Two-Year-Old Pace. 
50 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner 

of Three-Year-Old Pace when mare 

was bred. 



$150 In Special Prizes was paid to Stallion Owners In December, 1914 
ENTRANCE AND PAYMENTS — $2 to nominate mare on December 1, 1914, when 
name, color, description of mare and stallion bred to must be given; $5 March 1, 
1915; $5 Novtnibtr 1, 1915; $10 on Yeailinijs, May 1, 1916; $10 on Two-Year-Olds 
February 1, 1917; $10 on Three-Year-Olds February 1, 1918. 
STARTING PAYMENTS— $25 to start in the Two-Year-Old Pace, $35 to start In the 
Two-Year-Old Trot; $35 to start in the Three-Year-Old Pace; $50 to start in 
the Thrce-Year-OUl Trot. All starting payments to be made ten days before 
the first day of the meeting at which the race is to take place. 
Nominators must designate when making payments to start whether the horse entered 
Is a Trotter or Pacer. 

Colts that start as Two-Year-Olds are not barred from starting again In the Three> 
Year-Old divisions. 



E. P. HEALD, 

PreslOent. 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 
Post Office Drawer 447, San Francisco, Cal. 



THE BEAUTIFUL SADDLE STALLION 

Scottie Moore McDonald 

By Champion Rex McDon&Id 833 

MUST SELL 

on account of my failing health 

A tried sire, possessing the most desired blood lines, in 
the prime of his life and is offered at a price that should 
appeal to any one in the market for a stallion. 

HE WILL PAY FOR HIMSELF THE FIRST YEAR 

For prices ami further information address 

J. R. HODGE, Laddonia, Missouri 



JOE CAREY 



$50 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION 



Haydcn 
Edwards.. 



. Prince Charlie 



Blair Athol 
Eastern Princess 



Sire of 
Brighouse 
Orange Blossom 
Custom House 
Azurea 
Mercurium 
Deckhand 
Buckshot 

Bernice. and other 
Good winners. 



[Bannockbtun... ^ 

< 



< Nannie Bay { gl^"! Butler 

Bettie Blaise.... I j" 



U 

o 

[ Miss Marion.. .. 



f nimyar.. 



r .Vlarm.. 



I Eclipse 
! Msud 

I rti„ f Lexington 

' \ Hegira 



. imp. .\stolat.. 



( KimhKT 1 Bucaneer 

) ^^''^^ 1 Miner*! 

i Bellicent ! 

I Lynette by 



Lord Lyon 



Address all communications to: 



GEO. RYAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



BREED TO THE COAST'S CHAMPION CAMPAIGNER AND FUTURITY SIRE 




Rec. 2:01 3-4. 
Reg. No. 44977 



Jim Logan 

sire ot Hal Logan 2:09, Maxine (3) 2:15, winner of 

Breeders' Futurity, etc. 
Son of CHARLES DERBY 2:20, brother to Klatawah 
(3) 2:05'/2, etc., and sire of TEN In 2:10. 
Dam, EFFIE LOGAN, dam of Jim Logan 2:01%, Sir 
Albert S. 2:0S>i, and Dan Logan 2:07%. 

In the stud, season of 1917, at Woodland Race Track. 
FEE: $50, usual return privilege, $75 to insure liv- 
ing colt payable at time ot service or before removal 
of mares. Call at race track or address 

J. ELMO MONTGOMERY, Davis, Cal. 



NEW EDITION OF JOHN SPLAN'S BOOK 

"LIFE WITH THE TROTTER" 



i M'Mik BRBBDBB and ■PORTBMAM, P. O. 



FRIGE $3.00 POSTPAID 
DiAwar 441, tea FiMil— OBL 



Saturday, January 27, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 Bast 23rd St., 

New York City. 
Entered aa Second Clasa Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year, i3; six months, $1.76; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage $1 per year additional; Canadian postage 
60c per year additional. 

Money should be sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE SEASON OF 1917 promises to be one of the 
best ever enjoyed by the lovers of and participants in 
harness racing. The Grand Circuit has been ar- 
ranged and contains a gi'eater number of meetings 
than for many years, and the purses to be offered 
are large and numerous enough to attract a larger 
number of horses and owners than have been seen 
in a long time. Here in California we ai-e to have 
a circuit that will attract horses from all over the 
coast, as the circuit now being arranged will provide 
at least fifteen meetings with three to seven-day pro- 
grams and purses ranging from $400 to $1,000. We 
expect .to see the largest list of entries that have 
been made for many years and these will assure a 
large attendance and consequently profitable meet- 
ings all along the line. The only question now both- 
ering those who are engaged in organizing a circuit 
on practical lines is to provide for all the places that 
desire to come in. With all the places north of 
Fresno arranged into a circuit that will start in 
July it will not be difficult to make an amicable ad- 
justment of dates for the fairs and race meetings to 
be held in towns south of the raisin center. Mr. 
Waddell, secretary of the newly organized Fair and 
Racing Association, is meeting with such an enthu- 
siastic reception in every town he has thus far vis- 
ited that he is most optimistic over the organization 
of a circuit that will be the best seen on the Pacific 
Coast for years, and he is already in receipt of letters 
from horse owners and exhibitors in the northwest 
and elsewhere who are anxious to come to California 
this summer and are only awaiting for the official 
announcement of programs and dates to make their 
decision. It will take Mr. Waddell a few weeks to 
get the preliminaries arranged but a very early an- 
nouncement of all particulars may be looked for. 
We advise every owner who has a horse that is worth 
exhibiting or racing to begin to get him ready as 
there will be plenty of classes for all. The new rule 
which allows every trotter and pacer a second off 
for every year that has passed since he failed to 
equal or lower his record will bring out many a 
contestant that has been considered outclassed here- 
tofore. Mr. Waddell will visit San Jose, Hollister 
and Salinas during the next few days, and then he 
will go north to Dixon, Woodland, Marysville and 
oth^r places. 

■ ' 

THE SPRING SALE of the Chicago Horse Sales 
Company, which is advertised in this issue of the 
Breeder and Sportsman, offers a splendid chance for 
California owners who want to sell, as Chicago is 
the best horse market in the United States today. 
Among those who have already consigned horses to 
this sale are C. A. Spencer of Santa Rosa and Geo. 
A. Lowery of San Francisco. This is an opportunity 
for those who want to sell to take advantage of. 
Owners should correspond with the Chicago Horse 
Sales Company immediately so as to get the full 
value of the extensive r'\vertisiag this company will 

do. for this sale. 
I , «> <S> ^ 

■ Mr. G. J. Giannini, president of the San Francisco- 
Carifornla Driving Club, and one of the directors of 
ihe Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders' Associ- 
ation, left for New York this week on business mat- 
'ters- connected with the commission house of which 
be f^ , manager. It Is not beyond a possibility that he 
ni'ay see a trotter or pacer while on the trip that he 
will add to his racing stable this year. 



THE CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT. 



Several Towns Desire a Place That Were Not 
Represented at the Conference. 



Since Joseph Waddell was elected Secretary of 
the California Fair and Racing Association, he has 
visited Pleasanton, Santa Rosa and Petaluma in the 
interests ot the proposed circuit and has received 
letters from a number of persons residing in towns 
that were not represented, but desire to be, when the 
circuit is fully organized. 

At Pleasanton it was learned that citizens there, in 
conjunction with Mr. R. J. MacKenzie, owner of the 
track, desired to open the circuit as early as July 
4th, and that a day's racing for that date has already 
been financed. Mr. Waddell showed them the advan- 
tage of holding a meeting of four days beginning 
Wednesday, July 4th, and the probability is that 
such a program will be arranged. 

On his visit to Santa Rosa in company with Presi- 
dent L. L. Cannon of the association, they found that 
the citizens of that city were ready to subscribe to 
a financial guarantee against loss for a properly con- 
ducted fair and race meeting and that August 15th 
to 18th would suit them very well for dates, but they 
were willing to shift a week forward or backward 
to accommodate others. 

Mr. Cannon and Mr. Waddell then visited Peta- 
luma and met with a cordial reception from the 
horsemen and others who would like to see that 
town on the circuit. 

There are five weeks between the proposed open- 
ing at Pleasanton and the Santa Rosa fair, so Messrs. 
Cannon and Waddell set to work to devise a plan 
by which other towns could be brought into the cir- 
cuit . From all that can be learned Eureka, Hum- 
boldt county, and Ukiah, Mendocino county, would 
like to join the circuit and their citizens are willing 
to aid materially in a financial way if the regular 
circuit horses can be brought there. 

Salinas and Hollister will also do much to aid a 
good race meeting and Mr. Waddell says he believes 
a circuit of the towns that would join and give meet- 
ings before the State Fair can be arranged as fol- 
lows: 



Pleasanton July 4- 7 

Salinas July 11-14 

Hollister . July 18-21 

Petaluma July 25-28 

Eureka Aug. 1- 4 

Ukiah Aug. 8-11 

Santa Rosa Aug. 15-18 

Dixon Aug. 22-25 

Woodland Aug. 29-Sept. 1 

Marysville Sept. 41 7 

State Fair, Sacramento Sept. 8-15 



Such a circuit would provide ten weeks of racing 
before the State Fair opened, and would give all the 
towns that desire to hold fairs and race meetings 
after that date opportunity to fall in line for a cir- 
cuit of fall meetings. The Alameda, Stanislaus, 
Kings and Kern county fairs might then agree on 
dates that would be consecutive and give a Califor- 
nia circuit that would stsrt the first week in July 
and end during the month of October. 

Mr Waddell is energetically at work and proposes 
to visit every town where there is a chance of hold- 
ing a meeting and arranging them into a real and 
convenient circuit. 



Glenn County to Hold Fair. 

Orland (Glenn Co.), Jan 24. — The agricultural and 
live stock fair of Glenn county is to be located at 
Orland. It is incorporated for $10,000, already in 
part paid up. Its first beginning was last fall, and 
the present year will see one of the best and biggest 
fairs ever held in Northern California. 

James Mills, the largest farmer the Sacramento 
valley has seen since the days of Dr. Hugh Glenn, 
will be president. This alone assures its being car- 
ried on on a scale that will assure it state-wide prom- 
inence. Chris Myhre will be vice-president. H. M. 
Kingwill will be treasurer. These officers have all 
been duly elected and will foim a corps of leaders, 
efficient and enthusiastic. 

A board of fifteen directors also has been elected, 
as follows; President, James Mills, Hamilton City; 
vice-president, Chris Myhre, Orland; secretary, E. A. 
Kirk, Orland; treasurer, H. M. Kingwill, Orland. 

A three day show will be held in Orland next fall. 
Ample grounds will be provided, and ample exhibit 
space. It is the intention of the officers and direc- 
tors to make the exhibition county-wide in its scope, 
and to cover every line of agricultural activity. The 
movement has started with a vim, and is being car- 
ried out with a broad conception of its possibilities 
that assure its abundant success. 

The Orland center of the farm bureau was the 
father of the idea. The entire farm bureau of the 
county took the matter up and furthered its advance. 
The farming interests outside of the farm bureau 
influence have joined in the movement. 

o 

Al. Sanders, who gave some very successful one- 
day harness race meetings at Philadelphia last year, 
is the person who has succeeded in getting a place 
on the Grand Circuit for that track. He raised a 
$10,000 guarantee in a few hours. 



CALIFORNIA TO THE FRONT. 



[By Stockton Fountain, in The Farmers' Homo 
Journal, Louisville, Ky.] 

Someone has said "all things come to those who 
wait, but they get their share who go after them." 
The year 1916 will go down in the annals of history 
as one of truly great achievement for the State of 
California. 

The Golden Gate State has proved that the Far 
West is really a factor in this great country of ours. 

The great International Live Stock Show pro- 
claimed the Hereford-Shorthorn yearling California 
Favorite to be the Grand Champion steer. He sold 
at auction for the record price of $1.75 a pound. Oats, 
barley and bran constituted his ration chiefly. Cattle 
men of the corn belt states readily admitted that the 
impossible could happen and that in the beef world 
California could play her cards as ably as she had 
in the Presidential election. 

California now steps forward, and commands the 
services of Missouri's noted live stock authority — 
"Jump" Cauthorn— past editor of the Missouri Stock- 
man — now with The Breeder and Sportsman of San 
Francisco, California. 

"Jump," as he is familiarly known and admired by 
thousands of friends, is a self-made saddle horse 
journalist. He was born in the "saddle" and was 
a real "rail bird" the first time he saw his father 
lead out Rex Edmonston, Thornton's Star, and oth- 
ers. His ambition was to render service to his maj- 
esty — the saddle horse — rather than to take a college 
degree. 

As an exhibitor and owner of "The Intelligencer," 
"Jump" soon won a home with every exhibitor and 
fair association of Missouri. He can write of the 
saddle horse as no other could possibly do without 
his experience — and his way is so original that you 
are visiting with the horse alone. 

"Jump" will be missed by scores of admirers. When 
the "rail birds" assemble the coming year, there will 
be a chair turned down for our old friend "Jump." 

California, our loss is your gain. Missouri trusts 
that you will appreciate the opportunity of having 
"Jump" become a citizen of >our State, that you will 
afford him a field for greater development, and honor 
and fame will come to your saddle horses and to 
your hogs and cattle. 

In conclusion, I am sure that I voice the sentiment 
of all Missouri horsemen, in trusting that success 
shall crown the efforts of our old friend "Jump" Cau- 
thorn in the future as it has in the past. May you 
continue to forge ahead, California, and prove to the 
world that along with the scenery and climate, you 
have beef cattle, horses, etc., and above all else, 
men — men like "Jump," with courage and love for 
work. 

o 

To breed a "Khaki" Horse. 

At the Havana Horse Show which will be held 
next month a special cup is to be offered for a horse 
suitable for cavalry that will be of a dun color. In 
this connection Col. Spencer Borden of Fall River, 
Mass., who gives the cup and who for several years 
has been a breeder of Arabian horses ,and whose 
book "What Horse For the Cavalry" is one of the 
best on this subject ever written, writes as follows 
to the New York Rider and Driver: 

"I have for a number of years made a study of 
horses for the cavalry service, and visited many 
countries to see them. I am impressed with the idea 
that the Cuban Colon Horse, dun in color (biccocho, 
they are called in the Philippines, almost Amarillo), 
with black legs, mane, and tail, many of them with 
a black stripe on the back, would be an ideal founda- 
tion for a cavalry horse, if bred to a good chestnut 
colored Arab of pure blood. 

"When the Hungarian Government started to de- 
velop their wonderful breed of chestnut cavalry 
horses that they call Gidrans, they selected 80 chest- 
nut mares, bred them to chestnut Arab horses and 
kept all the chestnut female offspring as foundation. 
These have again been bred to chestnut Arab stal- 
lions, till now the Chestnut Gidran is an established 
breed, that breeds true. 

"In these days all soldiers are being clad in khaki 
colored uniforms. They would also like khaki col- 
ored horses if they could get them; and to my mind 
the Cubans have a chance to be the first to establish 
such a breed. A gallant American cavalry officer 
just back from the border, whom I met in Washing- 
ton last week, told me that the men under his com- 
mand always knew when a certain commander got 
secret orders that he might be ordered over the bor- 
der, for at that time he always gave his old white 
horse a coat of brown paint. Why not breed them, so 
they would not have to be painted! 

"Therefore, I offer a cup for Colon mares, suitable 
for breeding cavalry horses, shown at the Havana 
horse show." 

o 

Stoughton A. Fletcher, of Indianapolis, Ind., has 
added another high class brood mare for his stud 
which Peter the Great 2:07 Vt heads. This one is 
Clara Cantrill, the dam of the sensational stake trot- 
ter, St. Frisco 2:03Vi, purchased a few days ago from 
F. D. McConnell of Tulsa, Okla. Clara Cantrill Is 
a ten-year-old mare, sired by Clarence S. 2:19'/^, a 
speed-siring son of Wilkes Boy 2:24V4, and her dam 
was Cantrill (dam of Miss Penrile 2:17Vi), by Nut- 
wood 2:1S%, second dam Miss Rednion 2:29%, a 
producing daughter of Bourbon Wilkes, third dam 
Becky Bird II., a producer, by Westwood, a son of 
Blackwood 74. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1917 



Harness Horses and Horsemen 



Berta Mac's Daughter, Bertha Maguire. 

Worthinston Parsons, formerly of Salinas but now 
retired from farming and the breeding of horses, and 
a resident of San Francisco, dropped into the Breeder 
and Sportsman office one day this week to sign a 
transfer of some of the horses he had sold, and in 
the couise of the usual horse talk remarked that he 
visited the famous Curies Neck Farm of Mr. C. K. 
G. Billings near Richmond, Virginia, last year and 
there saw his old mare Berta Mac 2:08 by McKinney, 
that he had bred and raced here on the coast and 
raced to her record. With Henry Helman as her 
trainer Berta Mac won $15,000 for Mr. Parsons and 
she was then sold to Mr. Billings for $7000. Conse- 
quently it was with a lot of pleasure that Mr. Par- 
sons visited Berta Mac in Virginia ,and the fact that 
Virginia is Mr. Parsons' native State did not detract 
any from the renewal of Berta Mac's acquaintance. 
She had a weanling at foot by The Harvester and 
Pansons says the youngster was full of fire and so 
wary that he could not get near him. This colt was 
named Harvest Lord and brought $600 at the Old 
Glory last November. After visiting Curies Neck 
Mr. Parsons attended the great meeting at Lexing- 
ton and there saw Berta Mac's first foal. Bertha Ma- 
guire, start in the Kentucky Futurity for two-year- 
old trotters, which was won by that wonderful fllly 
The Real Lady 2:0iM in two heats in 2:07i^ and 
2:07, with Mary Coburn second and Berta Mac's filly 
third. Mr. Parsons says that Bertha Maguire looked 
exactly as Berta Mac did at her age and trotted just 
like her. The following week Bertha Maguire was 
started in a two-year-old race, that went to three 
heats and proved to be the fastest three heats ever 
trotted by two-year-olds. It was won by Worthy 
Volo, who took the first heat in 2:11%, after which 
Harvest Gale won a heat in 2:07%, and Worthy Volo 
captured the third heat and the race in 2:10^^. Ber- 
tha Maguire was third in every heat and was sepa- 
rately timed in 2:08% in the second. Mr. Parsons 
says that Townsend Ackerman, who trained and 
drove Bertha Maguire in all her races last year, ex- 
pects her to trot very close to 2:00 before she quits 
racing as she is sound and all right in every way 
and as game as any trotter he ever drove as well as 
having a wonderful amount of endurance. She is by 
The Harvester 2:01. 

Death of Advertiser 2:15J4. 

Advertiser 2:15*4, one of the very few remaining 
sons of Electioneer, died recently at Springfield, 
Ohio, aged 29 years. He was bred by the late Sen- 
ator Leland Stanford at the famous Palo Alto Farm 
and $125,000 was offered and refused for him during 
the Senator's lifetime, the Senator absolutely refus- 
ing to set a price on him. When Advertiser was six 
years old his son Adbell, whose dam was the famous 
Beautiful Bolls, trotted to the world's yearling record 
of 2:2'i, which record remained for 19 years. This 
added to the fame of his young sire but in the years 
following nothing like Adbell appeared at the farm 
and when the farm's dispersal sales began after the 
Senator's death Adbell was one of a consignment 
that went to the eastern auction sales in 1899 and he 
was knocked down to the bid of Gen. B. F. Tracy 
for $2600, or about one hundred and twenty thousand 
dollars less than could have been taken for him a few 
years previous. He was a very handsome horse and 
won the blue ribbon at the National Horse Show 
when shown there. He was not a great success as a 
sire of fast performers as but 25 trotters and 5 pacers 
with standard records were sired by him, and none 
of them are in the 2:10 list. His sons and daughters 
are doing better, however. Adbell, that died at 
nine years old, was the sire of three and the dams of 
three in the 2:10 list. Eleven of Advertiser's sons 
are producing sires, and 15 of his daughters have 
produced standard speed. Advertiser was by Elec- 
tioneer out of Lulu Wilkes by George Wilkes. It is 
said that Arion 2:07% and Hummer 6112 are now 
the only living sons of Electioneer, that great horse 
that founded at Palo Alto Stock Farm one of the 
greatest of all trotting families. 

Keep Your Colts and Fillies in This Stake. 

How about your two-year-old that is entered in 
Pacific Breeders Futurity No. 15? This stake is 
worth $5,150 and the two-year-old divisions are to be 
trotted and paced this year. The amount given for 
the two-year-old trot is $800, and for the two-year- 
old pace $500. The payment necessary to keep your 
colt or filly in the stake is $10, and it must be made 
on or before next Thursday, February 1st. The two- 
year-olds will make an interesting race this year as 
they generally do, as they are all unknown quantities 
until they get the word in a real race. There will 
probably be several races for two-year-olds given on 
the circuit this year, but the Pacific Breeders Futu- 
rity will be the main race for the colts and fillies 
of this age. Don't miss a chance of getting some of 
this stake money by failing to make this payment. 
Next Thursday is the date, February 1st. Also re- 
member that this payment is necessary to keep your 
colt eligible to the three-year-old divisions which are 
to be trotted or paced next year. 



Curies Neck Horses to be Dispersed. 

Right on top of the announcement that C. K. (J. 
Billings had sold his New York residence, had offered 
the famous Curies Neck Farm in Virginia for sale 
and would move to California, came the news this 
week that he would sell his entire trotting stud at 
auction this spring, reserving only the two great 
champions Uhlan 1:58 and Lou Dillon 1:58^^. This 
means the dispersal of one of the greatest collections 
of brood mares in the country, together with the ex- 
champion stallion trotter The Harvester 2:01. It is 
stated that Mr. Billings expended over a million dol- 
lars in buying and improving Curies Neck Farm, 
which comprises 5,000 acres of land and is probably 
one of the best appointed horse breeding farms in 
the world. Among the brood mares on the farm are 
Lou Dillon 1:58>^, Berta Mac 2:08, Baroness Virginia 
(3) 2:08>4, Baroness Evelyn (3) 2:12%, Bemice R. 
2:07*4, Kingston Bell 2:10%, Louise Wilson 2:10%, 
Zarrine 2:07>.4. Adioo Dillon (2) 2:24%, Nancy Royce 
2:06'/i. Margaret Preston 2:10*4, Santos Maid 2:08%, 
Ethel Toddington (2) 2:13%, Lucille Marlow 2:09%, 
Lufille Bingen (3) 2:08*^, and many others. The 
weanlings by The Harvester from the Curies Neck 
Farm mnres brought an average of over $700 at the 
Old Glory sale last November, one of the largest 
averages ever received for weanlings, so it is not 
probable that Mr. Billings is selling out on account 
of any depres sion in the prices of trotting bred stock. 
Mr. Billings will make Santa Barbara his home, and 
has alread.v shipped seven or eight trotters there to 
use- under the saddle, an exercise to which he is 
greatly devoted. 

Grand Circuit Dates For 1917. 

The Grand Circuit for 1917 will open at Cleveland, 
Ohio (North Randall track) on July 16th and close 
at Atlanta, Georgia, October 20th. The circuit stew- 
ards met at Atlanta this week, re-elected W. K. De- 
vereux as president and allotted the following dates, 
according to press dispatch. It will be noticed that 
Philadelphia will be a member of the circuit this 
year: 

Cleveland (North Randall) July 16-21 

Detroit July 23- Aug. 4 

Kalamazoo Aug. 6-11 

Columbus Aug. 13-18 

Cleveland Aug. 20-25 

Philadelphia Aug. 27-Sept. 1 

Hartford Sept. 3- 8 

Syracuse Sept. 10-15 

Columbus Sept. 17-29 

Lexington Oct. 1-13 

Atlanta Oct. 15-20 

It will be noticed that Columbus and Cleveland will 

each hold two meetings ,and that Lexington is given 

its usual two weeks. 

To Stallion Owners. 

Other things ^eing equal, owners of good mares 
prefer to breed them to stallions that are well ad- 
vertised. The advertised stallion not only does more 
business but gets a better class of mares and thereby 
sires more winners and high-class colts that will add 
to his fame and value. If you own a stallion that is 
worth his keep as a stallion, printer's ink is as neces- 
sary as any other item of his keep, in fact, it is the 
one expense that will bring cash returns. Now is 
the season to let the public know about your horse. 
Owners of mares are choosing the horses to patron- 
ize. Get your announcement in early when it will 
produce the strongest impression. State terms for 
service, give breeding and other particulars, or let us 
know and we will fix up the copy for you. 

An advertisement in the Breeder and Sportsman 
for three months will cost according to space used; 
for instance, you can put in an announcement the 
size of that of the Blackhawk Stock Ranch on page 
two, for $5 a month. Also don't forget that the 
Breeder and Sportsman issues a modem Stallion 
Service Book, the price of which is $1, and tabulates 
pedigrees and prints stallion posters and folders, 
doing expert work at the lowest prices. 

Bill to Provide Fifteen Agricultural Districts. 

Senator Slater of Sonoma county, always a friend 
of the live stock breeders and agriculturists of Cali- 
fornia, has introduced in the California Senate a bill 
dividing the State into fifteen agricultural districts 
and giving the counties power to co-operate in hold- 
ing district fairs. This is a bill that should pass, 
for nothing has been more clearly demonstrated than 
the fact that district or county fairs are a wonderful 
aid in developing the resources of the sections in 
which they are held. Any person who attended the 
State or any of the county fairs held in California 
last year could not help but notice the great interest 
manifested in the displays of live stock, while the 
sales of pure-bred cattle, sheep and hogs for breeding 
purposes ran into thousands of dollars. Fifteen fairs 
could be arranged in a circuit that would attract 
entries from the leading live stock breeders of the 
United States and prove of immense value to the 
industry in California. There should be a concerted 
movement among the farmers and live stock breeders 
of this State toward inducing the Legislature to pass 
and the Governor to sign Senator Slater's measure. 

McKenzle Youngsters Shipped to Dick McMahon. 

On Monday last four youngsters owned by Mr. R. J. 
MacKenzie were shipped from Pleasanton Stock 
Farm to Dick McMahon at Macon, Georgia. They 
were the two-year-old colt Terry Patchen by Joe 
Pathen 2d, dam Zombro Belle by Zombro, Carl Ver- 



non by Vernon McKinney, dam by Carlokin, a filly by 
Vernon McKinney, dam Merry Widow 2:03%, and 
another two-year-old by Vernon McKinney out of a 
mare by Searchlight. All will be put in training by 
McMahon and all are fine prospects. George Ryan 
had them led out for inspection by a number of vis- 
iting liorsemen at Pleasanton last Saturday and all 
pronounced them a fine quartette of youngsters. 
Terry Patchen and Carl Vernon both took the ex- 
perienced eye of C. A. Durfee, who said he would 
like to have both of them in his own stable. Terry 
Patchen is one of the best developed two-year-olds 
we have seen this year and has natural trotting speed 
of a high order, having already stepped an eighth in 
16 seconds. 

Experimenting with Starting Machines. 

Down in New Zealand where they are trying to 
handicap trotters and pacers by yards instead of 
seconds, a number of new devices are being tried. 
The latest invention, according to the New Zealand 
Referee, is that of Mr. D. M. Robertson, of Christ- 
church, and it is really an ingenious piece of work. 
The object of the invention is to provide a reliable 
construction which will operate silently. Two posts 
are provided, one on either side of the course at 
each end of the points where the barriers are re- 
quired, and upon each of these posts is provided an 
arm pivotted at one of its ends so as to be capable 
of swinging in a vertical plane parallel with the 
course. The barrier consists of a card which is at- 
tached to the ends of the arms and extending across 
the course to a corresponding arm, the arrangement 
being that when the arms are down the barrier will 
be closed and so retain the horses behind it, and 
when the starter presses a lever all the barriers, 
which are placed at intervals of 12 yards, will simul- 
taneously be released. The idea is really after the 
style of the barrier now in use for the starting of 
gallopers, only instead of one barrier being used, as 
many barriers as there are handicapped horses may 
be utilized, the whole number being linked up so that 
when the lever is released all will fly up in a hori- 
zontal position, thus effecting the start. The bar- 
riers can be readily altered to sut the various dis- 
tances of handicaps. 

Promising Youngsters at Los Angeles. 

Mr. Charles Ramsey, of Los Angeles, who is an 
enthusiastic lover of horses, has a very promising 
bunch of youngsters at Exposition Park in that city. 
Among them is a handsome black gelding three years 
old, by Six Bells, dam Kinney wood by Zolock 2:05Vi, 
that has been an eighth in 17*4 seconds on the pace. 
Another nice one is a two-year-old fllly by Zomrect 
2:03%, dam a full sister to the gelding just men- 
tioned. A three-year-old stallion by a full brother to 
Auto Zombro 2:02*/6, out of a mare by Zolock 2:05*4, 
can trot a 2:20 gait taken right off the road and looks 
like a high class trotter. Mr. Ramsey also has the 
mare Donna Lee 2:19*4 by Donnasham, dam Bay 
Leaf by Telephone 2:16, that is in foal to Carlokin 
2:07*4, and that had two-minute speed when in train- 
ing as a two-year-old. Another member of the string 
is a very handsome yearling by Carlokin out of 
Donna Lee that should make a trotter. Donna Lee 
and this yearling are owned by Mr. Ramsey's son 
George. 

Trying to Close the Pool Rooms. 

A bill has been introduced in the California Legis- 
lature which has for its object the closing of the pool 
rooms which infest nearly every town of any size in 
the state. The bill makes it illegal for a newspaper 
to print any form chart or other news by which the 
bookmakers are enabled to make odds and the public 
to get information on which to back their "systems" 
of betting. It will be a hard job to devise a bill which 
will close the so-called pool rooms, and they probably 
will continue to be open for business so long as there 
is anything on which people wish to make wagers. 
There was probably more business done by these 
pool rooms on the result of the recent Presidential 
election than were wagered on horses during that 
time. Of course every one knows that all pool rooms 
can be closed in any town where the police do their 
duty, and we doubt if any law that will keep the 
daily newspapers from printing the form charts, se- 
lections, and other news will ever be enforced in the 
large cities. 

The Hay Market. 

Wholesale prices of hay in carload lots are quoted 
as follows this week: Fancy wheat hay, light 5-wire 
bales $20 to $21; No. 1 wheat or wheat and oat $17 
to $19; No. 2 wheat or wheat and oat $15 to $17; 
choice tame oat $18 to $19; other tame oat $14 to 
$16; wild oat $14 to $16; barley $14 to $16; alfalfa 
$14 to $17; stock hay $13 to $14; No. 1 barley straw 
70c to 90c. 

o 

Arlie Frost, the Monroe, Wis., trainer, has pur- 
chased the fast pacing mare Colleen 2:05*4, for one 
of his patrons. Colleen was in the stable of Henry 
Thomas, who raced the daughter of Charley D. 
2:06*4 for her former owner, E. L. Leach, of Cin- 
cinnati, the past season. This mare raced very con- 
sistently over both the mile and half-mile tracks and 
took her record in the first heat of the 2:07 pace at 
Lexington. She worked in 2:04*4 very handily over 
the Blue Grass track and ought to be a good mare 
for Frost the coming season. She was bred in Cali- 
fornia and is a daughter of the old mare Cricket 2:10, 
who was the first pacing mare to pace that fast. 



Saturday, January 27, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



Thoroughbred Matters 



THE RACING COMMISSION BILL, which it has 
been decided will not be introduced in the California 
legislature this year, and which it has been stated 
was endorsed by the Golden Gate Thoroughbred 
Breeders' Association, never came before that organ- 
ization for endorsement and had it so come it would 
have been materially altered in all probability before 
being submitted to the Legislature. A member of 
the aforesaid association informed the writer this 
week that at a meeting of the association held before 
the Legislature met, it was ordered that a bill pro- 
viding for a racing commission be drafted on the 
plan of the Kentucky law. A firm of legal gentlemen 
was instructed to prepare such a measure. When 
this draft was finished, copies of it reached the press 
and were published in the San Francisco Chronicle 
and the Breeder and Sportsman. When the meeting 
of the Golden Gate association was called to hear 
the bill read and to pass on it before submitting it 
to the State's lawmakers, but five members showed 
up and the meeting adjourned with the understand- 
ing that it would not be good policy to have the bill 
introduced at this session. Our informant stated that 
in his opinion the bill did not meet the approval of 
a majority of the Golden Gate's members and that 
had it ever come before that body it would have 
been materially amended before receiving their en- 
dorsement. The section which fixed the length of 
meetings at 30 days with two meetings a year was 
objectionable, as many thought the Kentucky law, 
which put the allotment of dates entirely with a com- 
mission to be appointed by the Governor, much more 
preferable . No association is permitted to hold a 
meeting lasting 30 days in Kentucky. There were 
several other features of the bill which were objec- 
tionable to the breeders of thoroughbreds and it was 
a mistake to say that it was endorsed by the Golden 
Gate Thoroughbred Breeders' Association. 

o 

The thirty head of thoroughbred youngsters which 
Geo. Ryan, superintendent of the Pleasanton Training 
Track, recently purchased from Lawrence & Com- 
stock ot the Oakwood Stock Ranch, Lincoln, Placer 
county, are now at Pleasanton and being broken to 
saddle. There has seldom been as nice a lot of young 
thoroughbreds in one collection. The two-year-old 
colt by Salvation out of Zorita, half sister to Emperor 
of Norfolk by Cerito 2d, is a grand looker and Ryan 
Intends keeping him for a stallion. He is a chestnut 
with white hind ankles and strip in his face. The 
sire of Zorita is by imp. The Hook out of the famous 
Miss Ford by Enquirer, and every dam of this colt 
back to the seventh is a producer of winners. Salva- 
tion is proving an excellent sire, no less than nine 
of his get being returned winners as two-year-olds 
last year. Nearly all the youngsters in this string 
are out of the dams of winners and as they are by 
Salvation, Rey Hindoo and Tim Payne they lack 
nothing in breeding. It is Mr. Ryan's intention to 
race several of them this year. The colts and fillies 
were sent down from the Oakwood ranch in excel- 
lent condition and all look big and strong and ready 
to commence galloping as soon as they are broke to 
the saddle. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

A. J. Gorey, of Covington, Ky., this week sold his 
good stallion Transvaal to R. J. Walden, for $10,000. 
"Transvaal is a bay horse .twelve years old, son of 
Commando and imp. Royal Rose, by Royal Hampton. 
He is the sire of thirty-eight winners which have won 
in the neighborhood of 200 races and $100,000. King 
Gorin, Blackie Daw, Little Bit, Resign and Balko are 
some of the best of his get. In speaking of the sale 
Mr. Gorey said: "While $10,000 may seem to some 
people as a large price to pay for a horse I think it 
is but about half what the horse is worth, as I pre- 
dict within the next year or two Transvaal will be 
the leading aire of North America, and the only ex- 
cuse I can offer for selling him Is he has become too 
valuable an animal for a person in my circumstances 
to retain. Mr. Walden, the purchaser, has a splendid 
stock farm at Middleburg, Md., stocked with a band 
of brood mares, the blood lines of which have no 
superior in America, and I feel sure what is Ken- 
tucky's loss will be Maryland's gain in the transfer 
nf Transvaal." 

♦ 

A bill to legalize the totalizator or pari mutuel 
machine is before the Australian parliament and will 
probably become a law. Under the terms of the bill 
10 per cent commission is to be taken out of the 
amount wagered on every race of which the Austra- 
lian government will take 7 per cent, allowing the 
association but 3 per cent. The government expects 
to realize about two million dollars per year from 
this source. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

John E. Madden sold this week to Messrs. Pinker- 
ton and Arnold ot New York, Duke of Ormonde, bay 
horse, 7, by Orsini out of Santa Bella by St. Serf; 
and Lord Rock Vale, brown horse, 4, by Rock Sand 
out of Lady Violet by The Ill-Used. These horses 
will be used to sire hunters. 



THOROUGHBREDS BETTER TODAY THAN EVER 



Racing Authority Compiles Tables to Prove This 
Assertion. 



Walter S. Vosburgh, handicapper for The Jockey 
Club tracks, and one of the authorities in America 
on racing, has compiled some interesting statistics 
and brought forth some interesting discussions dur- 
ing the off season. Most recently Mr. Vosburgh has 
turned his attention to records made and improved 
upon from lime to time. His latest discussion is as 
follows : 

"When I began attending races, Legal Tender's 
time, 1:44, was the fastest mile on record. I have 
often thought it might prove somewhat interesting, 
as demonstrating the improvement in the speed of 
the racehorse, if a table were presented, showing 
how the time for one mile and other distances, had 
been gradually reduced during the years following 
Legal Tendei"'s race. Never having seen one in 
print, and for want of a more perfect one, I present 
my own. which I have kept for many years ,and beg 
indulgence for any omissions in it: 

REDUCTION OF THE RECORD— ONE MILE. 
1:44 — Legal Tender, -5, 104 (third heat), Cincinnati, 

June 23, 1865. 
l:4:i% — Hen!og, 3, Cincinnati, September 21, 1869. 
1:431^ — Herzog, 3, Cincinnati, May 25, 1869. 
1:43V4, — Judge Curtis, 5, ll'', Saratoga, July 18, 1878. 
1:43 — Fadladeen, 4, 104, Lexington, May 22, 1871. 
1:43 — Salina. 3, 87, Lexington, May 23, 1871. 
1:42% —Alarm, 3, 90, Saratoga. July 17, 1872. 
1:42V4 — Grey Planet, 5, 110 (against time), Saratoga, 
1874. 

1:41% — Searcher, 3, 90, Lexington, May 13, 1875. 
1:4114 —Kadi, fi, catch weight, Hartford, 1875. 
1:41 — Warfleld, aged, 87, Saratoga, July 26, 1882. 
1:40V4 • — Boardman, 4. 91, Sheepshead Bay, September 
22, 1880. 

1:40 — Stuyvesant, 3, 111, Sheepshead Bay, September 
7, 1887. 

1:33% — Ten Broeck, 5, 110 (against time), Louisville, 
1S77. 

1:39 ',2 —Racine, 3, 107, Chicago. June 28, 1890. 
1:301/2 —La Tosca, 3, 105, Morris Park, October 10, 1891. 
1:391,4 — Raveloe, 3, 107 (straightaway), Monmouth, July 
31 1890 

1:38% —Libertine, 3. 80. Chicago, 1894. 
1:37 4-5— Brigadier, 4, 112, Sheepshead Bay, June 22. 1901. 
1:37 2-5 — Dick Welles, 3, 109. Harlem. Chicago, 1903. 
1:37 2-5— Kiamesha, 3. 104, Belmont Park. October 9, 1905. 
1:37 Vi — Kildeer, 4, 91 (straightaway), Monmouth, Aug- 
ust 13. 1892. 

l:3fi 4-5— Sam Jackion. 7. 117, Aqueduct, July 31, 1915. 
1:3()V4 — Amalft, 6, 107 (trotting track), Syracuse, Sep- 
tember 3, 1914. 
1:3.'>% — Salvator, 4, 110 (against time, straightaway), 
Monmouth. August 28. 1890. 

"Legal Tender's 1:44 was made in the third heat 
of a race of mile heats, and was the occasion of con- 
siderable dispute. The horse was a son of imported 
Sovereign ,and was bred by Col. W. S. Buford, who 
happened to be one of the judges at the meeting. 
Feeling that he was an interested party. Colonel 
Buford withdrew in favor of Mr. B. G. Bruce, who 
had a curious prejudice against the get of Sovereign. 

"The late Dr. J. W. Weldon, who trained Legal 
Tender, made a bet of $5 to $100 with a friend that 
Legal Tender would beat the record (Mammona's 
1:44%). He won it, as Legal Tender won the third 
heat in 1:44. Colonel Buford walked over to the 
timer's stand and remarked to the late Mr. R. A. 
Alexander, who was one of the timers: 'Well, what 
do you think of the Sovereigns now? Don't you 
think 1:44 a little better than the Lexingtons?' Mr. 
Alexander replied that it was remarkable, as the 
heat was really run in 1:43. Buford exclaimed, 'Why 
in hell didn't you report the heat as run?' Mr. Alex- 
ander answered that it was 'fast enough,' and that 
if the real time had been given a host of doubters 
would rise up and dispute it. Thus it stood, but Mr. 
John Smith, secretary of the' Buckeye Jockey Club at 
the. time, said his watch made Legal Tender's heat 
1:411/2. 

REDUCTION OF THE RECORD— SIX FURLONGS. 
1:16 —Alarm, 4, 108, Saratoga. July 17, 1872. 
1:15% —Chinaman, 3, 111, San Francisco, January 9. 
1875. 

1:14 — Barrett, 2, 110, Monmouth Park. August 14. 
1880. 

1:13 —Force, 5. 121, Louisville, September 24, 1883. 
1:11 —El Rio Rey. 2. 126 (straight). Morris Park, Aug- 
ust 31, 1889. 

1:1014 —Fides. 4, 116 (straight), Morris Park, May 31, 
1890. 

1:0')% —Yemen. 3, lOSi.i (straight). Morris Park, Octo- 
ber 1. 1892. 

1:09 3-5 — Iron Mask. 6, 115, Juarez. January 4. 1914. 
1:08 — Artful. 2. 130 (straight), Morris Park. October 
15. 1904. 

REDUCTION OF THE RECORD— NINE FURLONGS. 
1:561/2 —Fannie Ludlow, 4, 105, Saratoga, August 10. 1869. 
l;5t; — Fadladeen, aged, 111, Saratoga, August 19, 1874. 
1:54 — Bob WooUey, 3, 90, Lexington, September 6. 
1875. 

1:5:{ — Ro.salie. 4 (catch weight). Brighton. August 13, 
1881. 

1;.52% —Teuton, 4. 113, Chicago, June 28. 1890. 
1:5V,^ — Tri.stan, 6. 114. Morris Park, June 2. 1891. 
1:51 — Uonnibcrt, 4, 120. Brighton. July 20. 1902. 
1 :.50 3-.5— Charles Edward. 3. 126, Brighton, July 16, 1907. 
1:49 3-5— Roamer. 3. 124. Laurel. October 10. 1914. 

REDITCTION OF RBCOHD— liA MILES. 
2:10 — Narragansett. 3. 90, Saratogn. August 4, 1869. 
2:091/4 — Frogtown, 4. li'4, Lexington. May 4. 1872. 
2:08% — Grlnstead, 4, 108, Saratoga, July 24. 1875. 
2:08',<. — Charlie Gorhain. 3. 87, Lexington, May 18, 1877. 
2:08 — Mendels.sohn, 3, 95, Lexington, May 10. 1880. 
2:07% —Getaway. 3. 100. Snrntoga. August 4, 1881. 
2:071,2 — Blnette. 5, 101. Chicago, July 12. 1886. 
2:07 —Dry Monopole, 4, 106. Gravesend. May 14. 1887. 
2:06',i — Klng-ston, $. 122, Grave.Mcnd, September 24, 1889. 
2:05 —Salvator, 4. 122, Sheepshead Bay. June 25, 1890. 
2:03% —Banquet. 3, 109 (.straight). Monmouth, July 17. 
1890. 

2:02 4-5— Broomstick. 3. 104. Brighton. July 9, 1904. 

2:02 — Roamer. 3. 114 (trotting track), Syracuse, Sep- 
tember 5, 1914. 

2:00 —Whi.sk Broom. 6, 139, Belmont Park, June 28, 
1913. 

"Whatever may be said of the value ot time as a 



test, it Is certain that it is influenced greatly by 
conditions. The state of the weather, the tempera- 
ture, the condition of the ground, and the formation 
of the track — not to speak of the manner in which 
the race is run. Several of the records were made 
over straightaway courses, which, particularly in 
races over moderate distances, are greatly to the 
advantage of fast time when compared to a circular 
course. Ov(>r long courses, It is not so much so, as 
a straightaway gives no change in the use of the 
muscles, and a horse would tire much sooner. Some 
ot ihe races. Ten Broeck's and Salvator's miles, tor 
example, were not made in actual contests, but 
"against time," they having the course to themselves 
except for stable companions to help them regulate 
their speed. Accordingly, Sam Jackson's mile made 
in an actual race seems the most creditable perform- 
ance. 

"Taking all things into consideration, it would ap- 
pear from the records that the horses of today are 
faster than thone of forty or fifty years ago. But 
it is doubtful if they are so much faster as many 
people believe. Assuredly, there is a great improve- 
ment in the tracks which in those days were kept 
deeper than in later years, when they have been kept 
so hard as often to show the blue metallic mark of 
the horses' footprints. Besides, in the old days the 
tracks were often neglected until a short time before 
a meeting. 

"Little was done with them, while nowadays, some 
of them are kept in condition for galloping during 
the entire season. Naturally then a horse could 
gallop faster over the tracks of today than over those 
of forty years ago. So much, then, in favor of the 
horses of the earlier period. 

But on the other hand, if any one will compare the 
results in the records given above, it will be noticed 
that the early records generally were made by horses 
carrying very light weights as compared with those 
of today. For example, when Alarm in 1872 made 
his mile in 1:42%, he carried only 90 pounds, while 
Dick Welles, the same age (three years) in 1903 
made his mile in 1:37 2-5 with 109 pounds. 

When Legal Tender ran his mile in 1:44 in 1865, 
he was five years old and carried only 104 pounds. 
Herzog, Salina, Searcher and Warfield all carried 
very light weights. And the same is true in respect 
of other distances. Narragansett's record in 1869 
of 2:10 at a mile and a quarter, was made with 90 
pounds up, while Broomstick's 2:02 4-5 in 1904 was 
made with 104 pounds. At nine furlongs Fannie 
Ludlow, four years old, in 1869 made a record of 
1:56V4 with 105 pounds, while Roamer, three years 
old, in 1914 ran it in 1:49 3-5 with 124 pounds. 

"It is the habit of old racing men to admit that, 
while the horses of today may be speedier than those 
of the 'sixties' and seventies,' it is for short distances 
only; that they cannot carry their speed — they are 
not so stout and cannot stay over a distance of 
ground like the older generation. But the records of 
time do not bear this out. When I began attending 
races Kentucky's 4:01V^ was the 2i/4-niile record, 
made at Saratoga in 1965, as a four-year-old, with 
104 pounds . Ethelbert, the same age, with 124 
pounds, covered the distance at Brighton Beach in 
1900 in 3:)9 1-5 — over twelve seconds difference and 
with 20 pounds more weight. Again, take the record 
for four miles: We have practically ceased to run 
four mile races, therefore there is less opportunity 
for comparison; but in 1874 Fellowcraft, four years 
old, at Saratoga ran the distance in 7:19^, with 108 
pounds up, while in 1912 Sotemia, a five-year-old 
mare, ran it at Louisville in 7:10 4-5, with 119 pounds. 

"Accordingly, tlie 'predonderance ot evidence,' as 
they say in the courts, is rather in favor of the horse 
of today. Personally, I believe we have horses now 
in training that could gallop four miles in close to 
seven minutes. But they would need to be specially 
trained to do it. The system of training today is 
opposed to the system of training for four-mile races. 
Horses are trained to break fast and run at a high 
rate of speed from the start. Such horses would find 
it difficult to maintain that rate of speed very far. 
Indeed, the limit ot extreme speed in a racehorse is 
only about three furlongs — perhaps 600 yards is 
nearer the mark. 

"Some horses can carry a very high rate of speed 
for a mile or nine furlongs, but to Cdver four miles 
they would need to be trained to rate along, the heart 
action regulated, and the muscular system developed 
to sustain the prolonged effort. That would dimin- 
ish their speed tor the kind of races now In vogue; 
hence trainers are naturally averse to distance races, 
and rightfully so, as distance races are so few that 
the game isn't worth the candle." 

o 

All ten of the outside subscriptions to Headley & 
Miller's popular sire Uncle have been subscribed for 
1917. A. K. Macomber got four, R. J. MacKenzle 
two, F. R. Hitchcock, S. L. Parsons, Otto Stifel and 
A. L. Rogers one each. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Walter S. Heather, of Rugby, England, has made 
eleven nominations in the Futurity for 1919 to be 
run in New York. This is certainly an innovation 
and may lead to English breeders being well repre- 
sented in the leading American stakes. 

O. A. Bianchi sold this week the chestnut mare 
Irish Queen, by liearcatcher, dam Maid of Fermoy, 
by Trentola, by Trenton, and a half interest in the 
yearling colt, by Jim Gaffney, out of Irish Queen, to 
W. H. Luesing, for |1,800. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1917 




The horse is given to man to use, but not to abuse. 

❖ <S> 

Geo. E Stocking, of Rochelle, 111., last week pur- 
chased a good pleasure-using gelding from Blades & 
Holeman of HoUiday, Mo., for $275. 
y ♦ ♦ ♦ 

' Col. Paul Brown, the St. Louis horse lover, reports 
the sale of his stallion, Foss McDonald, to George 
M. Taylor, of Trenton, Tenn . Foss McDonald was 
purchased by Col. Brown at the Greenvell dispersioiv 
sale at Lakenan, Mo., last fall, and was considered 
one of the best bred stallions in Missouri. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

.las Buford, of Paris, Mo., is working nine saddle 
horses, among them the much-talked-of Katherine 
Farmer, owned by W. W. Crosswhite, of Clark, Mo., 
that is said to be going at her work in the proper 
manner, entirely settled and racking like a wild 
horse. He recently received four new ones from 
Jake Sikes, of Sikeston, Mo., for training. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Jas. Houchin, of Jefferson City, Mo., owner of the 
world famous saddle stallion Astral King, reports 
the demand for the progeny of that celebrity greater 
than he can supply. While there are many noted 
matrons at the Astral King farm, and a large num- 
ber of colts produced every season, Mr. Houchin has 
been forced to buy the colts of others breeders and 
this has brought the public service of this stallion 
in great demand. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

In this issue J. R. Hodge, of Laddonia, Mo., offers 
his magnificent stallion, Scottie Moore McDonald, for 
immediate sale. Ill health prevents this well known 
breeder giving this horse proper attention and the 
sale must be made at once . This unfortunate condi- 
tion will be the cause of some one getting a beautiful 
saddle stallion, a proven sire and show horse, at a 
ver> low fl','ure. Scottie Moore is sired by Rex Mc- 
Donald, and is one of the handsomest horses in exist- 
ence with the blood of the old champion. 

<8> <» ❖ 

There has been more fox hunting in Missouri this 
year than in a decade, clubs being formed in every 
section of the north-of-the-river country, and many 
new recruits going in for the sport. Dell Holeman, 
of Monroe county, has recently purchased a pack of 
hounds and has organized a club in that section. 
Fox hunting in Missouri is not a society stunt, it's a 
regular whiz of a sport, and the foxes are regular, 
"wild and woolly" and are scouted from their orig- 
inal dens. The baying of the hounds has the same 
effect on the old-timers as of a band playing Dixie. 
<$> <^> <$> 

It is understood that E. A. Trowbridge, of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture, Columbia, Mo., has been invited 
to serve as judge at the Cuban-American horse show 
at Havana, next month. He has not definitely decid- 
ed, however, whether he will accept or not. Mr. 
Trowbridge is one of the best judges in the country 
and his conscientious work has made him a univer- 
sal favorites with exhibitors. He has served in many 
states and was the judge at the California State Fair 
last year. His election is a splendid compliment of 
the association to the Missouri College, as well as 
to the saddle horse interest of that state. 

<?' ^ 

Blades & Holeman, of HoUiday, Mo., are repre- 
sented at the Denver horse show, this week, with the 
beautiful roan mare. Lady of the Decoration; the 
junior stallion, Beauchamp; the three-gaited Cath- 
erine Countiss, Theda Bara, and Dan Matthews. 
They are also showing the senior stallion. Noble 
Rex. In a letter to the Breeder and Sportsman, a 
recent visitor to HoUiday declares Blades & Hole- 
man will be well up in every award at the show. 
The Judy mare, referred to above as Lady of the 
Decoration, will make her first real show for these 
horsemen at Denver, under the name Adelaine Jeane, 
and Holeman declares there never was "no such 
boss." This mare's show at the Missouri State Fair 
last year was sensational. She was green, thin and 
pulling, but nevertheless at the same time wonder- 
ful. Beauchamp was the sensation of the saddle 
horses at the International, and is fifty per cent bet- 
ter now than at that time. Mr. Holeman probably 
will only show one of these in the $1,000 saddle 
stake and will reserve the other for the other class. 



The great demand for colts of champion Astral 
King is a splendid recognition, on the part of horse 
lovers, as to the popularity of that celebrated stal- 
lion. Astral King is siring a magnificent lot of colts 
which are selling as rapidly as they come on. The 
prospects for a "full house" in the stud this year are 
also bright for the champion. 

❖ <?> ❖ 

Lee Bros., of Mexico, Missouri's largest operators 
in the buying of horses and mules, during the last 
year averaged four carloads a week in shipments to 
the National market. In addition the firm's sales of 
high-class horses sold to Eastern users and dealers 
increases the number appreciably and value very 
materially. It is doubtful if there has been a con- 
cern in ihe Middle West that has gotten more out 
of the "war-horse" business than the Lee Bros. They 
are keen business men, and upon this business open- 
ing up their foresight and good judgment indicated 
to them the great possibilities of the business and 
they got busy and have continued busy. In this con- 
nection the firm has paid to the fanners of Central 
Missouri many thousands of dollars that would not 
have been theirs had it not been for the enterprise 
and resourcefulness of this popular firm. While the 
bulk of the buying during the last year has been 
done by Col. Will Lee, yet the junior member of the 
firm, Ed L. Lee, has been a big factor in this end of 
the business. George Lee has devoted the greater 
part of his time to the selling end and has been 
present at the inspections at which the representa- 
tives of the foreign governments pass upon the qual- 
ity and suitability for service of horses and mules 
furnished them by his firm. In this connection and 
as a testimonial of the good judgment used by the 
buying end of the firm Lee Bro.s. have had "branded" 
more horses and mules than any other firm of ship- 
pers on the National market, with fewer "rejects" 
in proportion to the number inspected. 




JOHN T. HOOK, America's premier saddle horse 
exhibitor. Mr. Hook is the manager of the saddle 
hor.se department of Longview Farm, which is the 
show place of Missouri and the leading saddle horse 
nursery of America. The Longview stable, headed 
by the magnificent stallion. My Major Dare, is being 
exhibited by Mr. Hook at the Denver Horse Show 
this week. Reports from Denver are to the effect 
that this is most spectacular exhibition of show 
horses ever given in the West and that the attend- 
ance is the best in history, fully 10,000 persons 
attending every performance. 



Mrs. J. Quinn, one of the prominent patrons of the 
San Francisco Riding Academy, has not missed a 
day on her favorite mount in many weeks. Mrs. 
Quinn is one of the most accomplished devotees of 
this popular sport in the city. 

« ♦ ♦ 

Langhome T a b b Anderson, of Point-au-View 
Farms, Maysville, Ky., has purchased of Jump Cau- 
thorn, of the Breeder and Sportsman, the undeveloped 
saddle mare, Lillian Terry. Mr. Anderson has been 
"dickering" for the mare for several weeks and when 
Cauthorn came to California the Kentucky horseman 
took advantage of the opportunity and purchased her. 
While the price was an exceptionally good one for 
a green mare, Mr. Anderson was well aware of the 
possibilities in this sensational doing mare. She 
is a full sister to The Intelligencer, one of the best 
horses produced in Missouri in recent years and for 
which an offer of $4,000 was refused. Like her illus- 
trious brother she is a bay with stripe in face and 
hind feet white, with excessive style and action. 



Two of the most attractive horses in San Fran- 
cisco are the chestnuts. Money and Tango, owned 
and ridden daily by Mrs. Winfield Scott Davis, a 
charming saddle horse devotee. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. St. Clair Boyd, who are spending the 
winter in the city, brought their favorite saddle 
horses up from their ranch and are taking advantage 
of San Francisco's splendid equitation paths and by- 
ways. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

A, J. Donzel, a well known San Franciscan, who is 
along in the sixties and rides a registered trotter 
every day, has not missed a day in the saddle for 
years and attributes his splendid health to this form 
of recreation. 

♦ ❖ ❖ 

John T. Hook, manager of the Saddle Horse de- 
partment of Longview Farm, Kansas City, Mo., 
writes the Breeder and Sportsman, from Denver, 
where he is showing the champion, My Major Dare, 
Joan Sawyer, Pi-ince of Melbourne and a new "King 
Bee" as he expressed it, called Silver Zizz, that they 
are having a fine show this week. The writer fully 
appreciates where the name Zizz comes from, as 
every horse lover in the Middle West and South 
knows what that popular sportsman, D. Schilling, 
said when he mounted the sensational High Ball, at 
the International several years ago. While the own- 
er. Miss Loula Long, declared at the close of the 
1916 Int( rnational that My Major Dare would be re- 
tired from the show ring, having won all honors pos- 
sible for a saddle horse to win, she has, however, 
decided to make one more performance with him at 
Denver, where both owner and horse are so popular. 
Mr. Hook in his letter declares he has the most sen- 
sational saddle horse he has brought out in many 
years in Silver Zizz, and expects to feature him in 
stake and championship classes the coming season. 
He was bought at Columbia, Mo., from Joe Howell, 
a well known horseman, who was using him as a 
farm horse, and when the writer first saw him he 
thought that was what Hook was going to do with 
him. The popular manager declared to the critics 
present .however, that he would make them all sit 
up and take notice before another year. He paid less 
than $200 for him and it is doubtful if he could be 
bought for $2,000 now. Deals of this kind are the 
cau.se ot John Hook's being the highest salaried 
saddle horse man in the United States. Watch next 
week's Breeder and Sportsman for a full report of 
the Denver show. 



Payments Due Feb.1 in $5,000 Saddle Horse Futurity. 

Owners of saddle horses eligible in the California 
.State Fair saddle horse futurities are reminded of 
the payment due in stakes number one and two, 
February 1, 1917. Stake number one is for three- 
year-olds, to be shown under saddle, and a payment 
of $25 is due and must be paid on every horse that 
is to be kept eligible and to show. Stake number 
I wo is for two-year-olds, to be shown to halter, and 
a payment of $15 must be made if the entries are to 
be shown in 1917 and kept eligible for the three-year- 
old division of 1918. 

Few stakes have ever been offered of such magni- 
tude and with such liberal conditions for saddle 
horses and this year's show will undoubtedly prove 
of more interest than any saddle horse exhibitions 
ever given in California. The three-year-olds have 
been rivals since weanlings, and this will be a test 
between the winners of former shows, where individ- 
uality played such a prominent part and their ability 
to perform five gaits correctly. Individuality, man- 
ners and soundness to count as before. It will bring 
about more than any one thing the qualities of the 
sire and matrons of California, and the winners will 
be worth double their present value. The breeders 
of saddle hor.ses and horse lovers of California have 
been watching these entries show since their wean- 
ling fonn, and they are keen to see them compete 
in a performance class. The three-year-old stake, or 
futurity number one, is for $1,200, and will be divided 
between the three and five-gaited varieties; $800 
.going to the five-gaited entries and $500 to thethree- 
gaited cliss. Every owner of colts in these futurities 
will make a serious mistake if they fail to make 
this payment. Should the two-year-olds not be in 
condition and ready for this show, they should be 
kept eUgibie for the final show in 1918, for after the 
sensation the three-year-olds will make in futurity 
number one, there will be a demand for two-year- 
olds eligible for next year's show. Every owner who 
expects to continue in the business and to encourage 
the breeding of saddle horses in California should 
make these payments. 

•Tames Hayes, on the W. M. Afflick place in Saling 
Township, now has forty head of mules to feed. He 
recently purchased a pair of extra good cotton mules 
from Walter Bryson. 

♦ « ♦ 

Robt. Ferris, of Laddona, recently sold twelve head 
of medium classed mules to O. E. Underwood, of 
WellsviUe. 

<?><?><* 

For nine years the grey gelding, "Billy Milo," has 
been puUing a mail wagon and a man that weighs 
over 200 pounds. In that time Billy has been off 
duty only four days, aside from legal holidays, trav- 
eling a distance of 52,560 miles, equal to two times 
around the world. 



Saturday, January 27, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



Notes and News 



October 1st to 14th are the dates selected for the 
Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders meeting in 1917. 

♦ ♦ 

E. J. Tranter now owns Zephyr 2:07%, the dam of 
"Virginia Barnette 2:07%. 

♦ ♦ «> 

W. H. Kinnan of Cleveland has been elected secre- 
tary of the Grand Circuit. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Seven thousand dollars will be given for harness 
racing at the meeting at Vancouver, B. C, August 
21-25. 

<$> <^ <S> 

Dick McMahon is back at Macon, Georgia, where 
his horses will winter and get their early spring 
training. 

Tenants of Madison Square Garden have been 
notified to move by March 1st, and the Fasig-Tipton 
Company will soon announce its new headquarters. 
<»<$><$> 

Ed Geers, who will soon celebrate his 66th birth- 
day, is reported to be in fine health this winter and 
to have fully recovered from the effects .of the two 
smashups he suffered last summer. 

<$> <S> <J> 

Of the ten head of horses owned by Mr. I. L. Bor- 
den that were at the Pleasanton track four head have 
been turned over to Sutherland & Chadbourne and 
the others sent back to the farm. 

«>««>♦ 

The time allowance will permit many a trotter or 
pacer that has not equaled his record for a few years 
to get back into the game again in classes where 
he belongs. 

<»<$><$> 

There are several horses being worked at Red 
Bluff Etnd it is thought a good meeting could be 
pulled off there this year if action were taken in 
that direction. 

«> ❖ ^ 

Sutherland & Chadbourne are only jogging the 
horses in their stable at Pleasanton these days, but 
they are as busy as bees as their stalls back of the 
Rose Hotel are about all full. 

John H. Wilson, of Springfield, Ohio, who owned 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:161/^, writes to renew his subscrip- 
tion to the Breeder and Sportsman and states that 
thev were enjoying good sleighing in Ohio last week. 
♦ ♦ 

W. H. Smollinger, for several years prominent in 
the affairs of the Great Western Circuit, has sold his 
Iron Mountain Stock Farm, Iron Mountain, Mo., and 
will dispose of all his trotting stock except Angiola 
2:06, and her son, St. Roch, by Bingen 2:061^. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

William Frye, an aged horseman who has worked 
at Pleasanton for several years past, suffered a para- 
lytic stroke one day last week and is now at the 
Alameda county hospital. Owing to his age, his con- 
dition is serious. 

^ <^ <J> 

C. E. Berry, who trained Mr. I. L. Borden's horses 
last year, has left that gentleman's employ and de- 
sires to engage as trainer of trotters and pacers. Mr. 
Berry has been a successful trainer in the east and 
can furnish the very best of references. 

<?> <8> <S> 

Jos. Twohig was at Pleasanton last Sunday, arrang- 
ing to send a couple of mares to George Ryan to be 
bred to The Anvil and Vernon McKinney. Mr. 
Twohig is engaged in farming at Mission San Jose, 
but he may find time this summer to take a horse 
or two through the California circuit. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The many friends of Mr. W. P. McNair of Phoenix, 
Arizona, who has acted as starter for the harness 
races on the California Circuit on several occasions, 
will regret to learn of the death of his estimable 
wife, which occurred at Phoenix on Saturday, Jan- 
uary 13th. The cause of death was heart disease. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The latest report concerning the future of Madi- 
son Square Garden, New York, is that that part of 
the property containing the arena, where horse 
shows and sales have been held, will be preserved, 
but that on the Madison and Fourth Avenue front- 
ages will in all probability be erected modem busi- 
ness buildings. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Several changes will be made in the next Ken- 
tucky Futurity, soon to be announced. The money 
set aside as prizes to the original nominators of the 
dams of winners has been increased from $800 to 
$3000, of which $2000 goes to the three-year-old divis- 
ion and $1000 to the two-year-old. Prizes are to go 
to nominators of dams of the first, second, third, 
fourth, fifth and sixth horses in each race. The pac- 
ing division of the stake is entirely eliminated. It 
has also been decided that the prize money will go 
entirely to the original nominators and none to those 
who get substitutes. In the case of any of the latter 
winning, the prize money will revert to the associa- 
tion. 



Harry Boyle, of Livermore, intends breeding a 
number of his big mares to a fine jack this year. He 
received the jack from Stockton last week and the 
horse and mule experts of Livermore who were pres- 
ent to look him over when he was taken off the cars 
predict that there will be some extra fine mules 
sired by this jack. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Tests recently made with the object of ascertain- 
ing the quantity of water drunk by horses went to 
show that medium-sized animals, engaged in farm 
work, consumed on an average from five to six gal- 
lons per day, and in hot weather, or under severe 
work, from eight to ten gallons. On dry rations of 
grain and hay they will naturally require more water 
than if soft, succulent foods of any kind are included 
to any extent in the rations. 

<S> ♦ 

The Bureau of Estimates of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture estimates that on January 
1st. 1917, there were 21,126,000 horses on farms and 
ranges in this country, having an average value of 
.'i!102.94 per head and a total value of $2,174,629,000. 
This is a slight decrease in the total number of 
horses over last year and a slight increase in value, 
as they averaged $101.60 last year. There were 
nearly five million mules in the United States Jan- 
uary 1st, with an average value of $118.32 per head. 
«> * ♦ 

A. R. Miller, of Vancouver, B. C, the man who 
formerly owned Bon Voyage 2:08 and Bonaday 
2:111,4, has purchased the bay stallion Hal Scott 
2:191/2 by Hal B. 2: 04 1/2. dam Maud Hunter by Cap- 
tain Hunter, grandam by Geneva. Hal Scott made 
his record in 1911 and under the allowance made by 
the new rules will get a second off his record for 
every year since, which will make him eligible to 
the 2:26 classes. He is a sound and fast pacer, a 
good looking stallion and resembles his famous sire. 
4> <» ♦ 

Hemet, Riverside county, desires to hold a race 
meeting during September this year. The half mile 
track at the famous Hemet Stock Farm is one of 
the best on this coast and has all the appointments 
for a first class race meeting. The plan as announced 
in the Hemet News is to give a two days meeting 
during the second week in September, with two 
harness and one running race each day. Purse, $400 
for the harness events and $100 for the running 
races. The meeting would be just prior to the one 
at Riverside. 

At Pleasanton Bert Webster is getting five head 
ready to attend speed school this spring. He has a 
couple owned by Thomas Coulter of Sacramento, 
bo*;h out of that fast mare Queen Derby 2:06%, one 
a four-year-old sired by The Bondsman and the other 
a two-year-old by Joe Patchen 2d. Others in the 
string are a gelding by Cole Pointer out of a mare 
by a son of Piedmont, another is a yearling by Ra- 
pallo out of a mare by Washington McKinney, and 
Rodney Patchen by Joe Patchen 2d, dam Miss Harris 
by Sidney Dillon. 

<$><?>♦ 

Last year the American Trotting Register Associ- 
ation had a rule that records made prior to and dur- 
ing the week of which July 4th was a part were not 
winrace records and therefore no bars. There seems 
to be an impression among horsemen that the new 
rules for 1917 vacate the conditions of the old rule. 
This is not the case. While no such conditions will 
be made this year the records made in races held 
during the week of July 4th or prior thereto in 1916 
will not keep them out of races in 1917 to which they 
are otherwise eligible. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

Another of the old-time Califronia horsemen has 
crossed the great divide. Suel Harris, a native of 
Maine, who came to California when quite a young 
man and engaged in farming and live stock raising 
in Sutter county, died at his home near Yuba City on 
Thursday of last week, aged eighty years. Six sons 
and daughters and seven grandchildren mourn his 
loss . His wife died about fourteen years ago. Mr. 
Harris was a man of high character, an enterprising 
farmer, and at one time greatly interested in the 
breeding of trotters. 

♦ <S> # 

That the Kentucky Trotting Horse Breeders' As- 
sociation should abolisli the pacing division of the 
Kentucky Futurity after more than fifteen years' trial 
is no surprise to the trotting horse fraternity in 
general. So few pacers were started in these futu- 
rities as to make interest in them almost nil, is the 
reason for this action. The reason for the scarcity 
of pacing colts is hard to understand. There are as 
many pacers in the class races as trotters, but so 
few three-year-old wigglers have been raced in the 
futurities that these events have been little more 
than jokes. 

♦ ❖ ♦ 

Sam Norris, of Santa Rosa, reached home last 
week with a car load of Arabian horses — two stal- 
lions and seven mares — which were purchased re- 
cently at Hingham, Massachusetts. They were 
shipped from Hingham by express and were only 
about six days on the road. These horses were pur- 
chased l)y a wealthy Japanese gentleman who is es- 
tablishing a breeding farm in Korea for the purpose 
of raising horses suitable for the Japanese army. 
Quite a number of thoroughbred mares have already 
been purchased and shipped to Korea. 



Horsemen will sympathize with George A Bain^ 
the- widely known live .'~tock auctioneer who cries^ 
the Old Glory and other big sales, in the loss of his^ 
mother, who died suddenly last week at Lexington,' 
Ky. Mrs. Bain was seventy-six years old, and is 
survived by her husband, George W. Bain, and his 
two sons, George A. and John W. ' 

Frank Loomis is handling a very elegant three^ 
year-old chestnut colt by Prince Ansel, dam Princess 
Bessum, dam of Prince Del Monte 2:22V4. second 
dam Carrie Malone, dam of Ray o' Light 2:08Vi and 
several others by Steinway, third dam Katie G., dam 
of Klatawah (3) 2: 05 14. etc. by Electioneer. This 
colt is owned by W. C. Brown, a Vancouver, B. C, 
barrister. Mr. Loomis is wintering several head of 
race horses at Vancouver, B. C. 

<S> <S> <S> 

Two important deals were put through at Lexing- 
ton week before last. James Snell sold to the Pas- 
time stable for a snug sum the promising youngster 
Harvest Song by The Harvester. This youngster 
was one of the juvenile sensations at the Lexington 
track last summer. The other sale was made by 
John Splan to Roy Miller, and was of the four-year- 
old Miss Gaiety that took a breeder's record of 2:20 
as a three-year-old last year. She is by Peter the 
Great. 

^ ^ 

Richard W. Russell, a pioneer of California and 
for many years engaged in the stage and livery busi- 
ness at San Andreas, Calaveras county, died at Stock- 
ton this week, aged 86 years. Arriving in California 
from New York by way of Cape Horn in September, 
1849, Mr. Russell engaged in mining in the Mother 
Lode country. In 18.'')2 he settled at San Andreas as 
a miner and sluiced out gold with three partners in 
the gulch that runs through the town today. Each 
man usually cleaued up about $30 per day. In 1854, 
with a few head of horses and two open buggies, he 
went into the livery business. Later he owned some 
of the finest livery horses to be found in the moun- 
tains . In the '70's Mr. Russell went into the stage 
business with a line running to Mokelumne hill. Later 
he operated a line from San Andreas to Milton. He 
had lived in Stockton for many years. 

Mr. C. A. Durfee hitched up his new Dodge ma- 
chine last Saturday morning and invited Secretary 
Jos. Waddell of the California Fair and Racing As- 
sociation, Mr. Nick Sweeney of Oakland, and the 
editor of the Breeder and Sportsman for a ride to 
Pleasanton. This is to certify that "Pop" is a care- 
ful driver, never exceeds the speed limit, and is as 
good ;i chauffeur as we ever rode with. Only once 
on the entire trip was there an incident that caused 
any worry . The engine stopped near Dublin and as 
anyone by the name of Durfee is certain to be well 
known in a town of that name, our chauffeur sat 
still and waited for someone to come along that was 
an expert with gas engines. A handsome young 
man driving a big car soon hove in sight and the 
question was put up to him. He raised the lid, 
looked at the engine and said there was nothing the 
matter. He thought perhaps Durfee had shut the 
gas off and forgotten to turn it on again. So the 
electric button was pushed and the engine turned 
over and worked as smooth as butter. Apologizing 
to the young man for delaying him, and thanking him 
for his advice, "Pop" started up and brought his 
guests safely into port. He insisted, however, that 
the engine stopped of its own accord and that in 
his opinion either the magneto crossfired or the car- 
buretor was hitting its knees. He said the car acted 
the same way once before but that time he started 
it hy putting a few gallons of gasoline in the lank. 
Thanks to Mr. Durfee we all had a fine ride and 
Geo. Ryan, superintendent of the Pleasanton track, 
treated us to the finest dinner we ever sat down to 
on a race track. 

o 

Horse Famine After the War. 

That the next ten years will see the greatest de- 
mand for horses the world has ever known is the 
opinion of Wayne Dinsmore, secretary of the Per- 
choron Society of America. His belief is based on 
the unprecedented destruction of horses in the great 
war in Europe, which some authorities estimate as 
high as 10,000,000. This country alone has lost one 
million horses and mules since the outbreak of hos- 
tilities. France, England, Germany and Austria as 
well as all the other countries in Europe, must have 
been stripped of available animals for military pur- 
poses. Russia alone has a supply sufficient to meet 
her own needs. 

When the war is over and the men under arms re- 
turn to agriculture and industry every countiy in 
Europe will be short of horses unless the market 
experts are much mistaken. They expect to see 
hundreds of thousands exported from the United 
States after peace is restored. Breeders who have 
ceased to raise horses in expectation that motor 
vehicles are going to supplant them in nearly all 
lines of work will soon see the mistake they have 
made, Mr. Dinsmore declares. "It takes time to 
make headway in the horse business," he says. "Five 
years are required to grow a horse of marketable 
age. At best one should not expect more than two 
foals from three mares, on an average, per year. 
Moreover, not more than sixteen per cent of our 
farmers are raising any colts. Two or three years 
hence the others are going to wake up only to learn 
that a great opportunity has passed." 



8^ 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1917 



CALIFORNIA DOGS GOING EAST. 



ROD. GUN AND K£NN£L 



Miss Anita Baldwin and Martin I. Smith to Show 
at Westminster. 



CONDDCTKD BY FISHER HUNT 



i 



No Arms for Aliens. — A bill is to be introduced by 
the Fi.sh and Game Commission prohibiting the car- 
ryins of firearms, by aliens. This measure is the 
most far-reaching and most important of any that 
the Commission is contemplating. 

A meeting of the committee on game and fish reg- 
ulation last week disclosed that many of the mem- 
bers were in favor of such a law. Carl Westerfeld, 
executive officer of the commission, is of the opinion 
that the bill will be carried. 

Following the enactment of a similar statute in 
Pennsylvania, the Italian Minister contested the law 
on the ground that it was unconstitutional. A year 
ago the United States Supreme Court held that such 
a law was constitutional. Since that time other 
states have enacted the same measure. 

Eighty per cent of the violations of fish and game 
laws are made by aliens, according to Assistant Ex- 
ecurive Officer Hunter, who also points out that in 
the past few years alien hunters have killed or 
wounded at least six state deputies. 

Angling Club Elections. — Annual elections in the 
two leading anglers' clubs of San Francisco have tak- 
en place recently. The California Anglers' Associa- 
tion has elected practically the same set of execu- 
tives who held office last year. They are: Floyd 
Spence, president; Charles Bredenstein, vice-presi- 
dent; George Wentworth, secretary; H. Cohn, treas- 
urer; and W. Ogle, Charles Gibbs and Joseph String- 
er, directors. 

William von Dohlen now heads the San Francisco 
Bass Club, for two years presided over by A. W. 
Thornton. E. F. Davis is the new vice-president, 
while James S. Turner and Charles H. Kewell were 
re-elected secretary and treasurer respectively. 

The Bass Club announces that it is prepared to 
line up behind the Fish and Game Commission and 
support any reasonable measure intended for the 
protection of flsh. However, the sentiment of the 
club ,as voiced by Thornton, is against any radical 
measure .which would have little or no chance of 
success at Sacramento. 

Hogs Eat Fish. — That hogs are fattening them- 
selves on bass, shad and salmon — the fish that the 
State Fish and Game Commission each year spends 
thousands to protect and hatch — and that millions of 
these fish die each year in the irrigating ditches of 
Sacramento valley, are some of the pertinent facts 
disclosed in a communication from H. G. French of 
Jacinto ranch, in Glenn county. 

Hatch charges that the Fish and Game Commission 
is derelict in its duties in not stopping the tremen- 
dous loss of valuable fish, which are sucked up by 
the powerful pumps which draw water for irrigation 
from the valley rivers. He says: 

"All that come within reach of the suction of the 
large pumps are doomed, not to immediate death, 
but to an eventual death in the canals, which have 
no outlet to any stream, and are allowed to run dry 
each winter, when irrigating ceases and the pumps 
are shut down. 

Striped bass exceeding a pound in weight have 
been sucked through even the small 24-inch pumps, 
and bass up to 10 pounds in weight frequently come 
through them. 

"To see the hogs wading through these shallow- 
pools, that are nearly solid with flsh, feasting on 
three-inch bass, perch and all varieties of flsh that 
spawn in the Sacramento river, is enough to make 
a sportsman's heart bleed. These canals destroy 
more flsh than all the fishermen on the upper Sacra- 
mento. 

"Since, according to the highest authority, more 
than 80 per cent of all salmon hatched in the natural 
way fall to reach maturity, whereas over 90 per cent 
of those released by hatcheries do, would it not be 
better to propagate more salmon and protect them 
while on their journey to the sea, rather than to 
curb a rapidly growing industry and add to the cost 
af salmon to the consumer by putting further restric- 
tions on the fishermen?" 

ae 

Indoor Rifle Match.— Philadelphia, Jan. 20.— Dr. 
\V. G. Hudson of Wilmington, Del., won the national 
indoor 22-calibre rifle championship here tonight, de- 
feating Arthur Hubalek of Brooklyn, the title holder, 
by a single point. Dr. Hudson scored a total of 
2,468 points. 

Alfred P. Rains of New York, world's champion 
pistol shot, won the 25-shot pistol championship of 
the United States with a .score of 236 points. Cap- 
tain W. H. Richard of New Haven, of the United 
States army, won the 20-shot prone rifle match with 
the score of 199 points and the 10-shot prone match 
with a score of 300. 

Tough on Rabbits. — Beware, you hunters who 
chase the naughty bunny! Beware, rabbits are 
"wors'n" we thought. "Meadowlark" Stuckenbruck, 
the blacksmith Senator from Lodi, has introduced an 



amendment to .section 637 of the penal code, which 
maligns and injures the character of our native jack- 
rabbits. 

Not content with calling the long-eared jumpers 
"predatory" animals, he puts them in the family 
Feladae, the cougars, bobcats and other wMcked var- 
mints. Perhaps the Senator has found a new spe- 
cies in the wilds of the San Joaquin valley, a curious 
animal with cats' claws and a long tail, which bristles 
when dogs approach. 

Many limes we have been startled when a huge, 
mule-eared bunny jumped right out of the brush in 
front of our gun. but never did we feel the need of 
a low-branched tree. 

With the rabbits of the ferocious family Felidae 
at large, it's trees for us. 

% 

Big Game Farm. — G. W. Bene, a Visalia resident, 
is preparing to start a wild animal farm, and he 
proposes to procure the nucleus for his farm from 
Golden Gate park in San Francisco. Register H. P. 
Andrews of the Sacramento land office has received 
a modest request from Bene that he be sold three 
deer and two buffalo from the Golden Gate park 
herd 

Bene's letter follows: "Dear Sir: I wa.s informed 
by a friend about deer. There are some deer at 
Golden Gate Park and I would like two does, one 
buck and two buffalo heifer calves. 

"I would like to get a start of them. If you can 
grant me a favor to get them, I wish that you would 
be so kind enough to help me, so I can get a start. 
Write soon." 

Andrews is a bit fearful that the city of San Fran- 
cisco will not allow him to sell a part of its wild 
animal herd, so he has referred Bene's letter to the 
San Francisco park commissioners. 

QC 

Bill for Preserve. — Santa Barbara. — State Senator 
R. Thompson proposes to make a strong effort to 
secure two wild-game preserves for this section. One, 
it is explained by the Senator, he expects to have 
located near Lompoc and the other in Ventura 
county, both on the National Forest Reserve. 

"The slaughter of deer is bringing this game close 
to extinction," said Senator Thompson last week, 
"and we are facing a really serious problem. Either 
we must close the deer season for at least three 
years or establish game refuges where wild game 
Will always be immune from the huntsman. 

"I favor two preserves as the most feasible solu- 
tion. We have the forest reserve officials with us in 
this plan. By wise conservation we will be able to 
add materially to the wild life of the county and in- 
crease the reputation of Santa Barbara and Ventura 
counties as a hunter's paradise." 

Forest Rangers Visit Park. — A hundred Forest offi- 
cers from the National Forests in California, dele- 
gates to the Forest Ranger Convention held in 
Berkeley from January 3 to 12, visited Golden Gate 
Park Sunday afternoon, guests of Superintendent 
John McLaren. The object of the trip was primarily 
to afford the Forest Rangers a lesson in the inten- 
sive development of the recreation features of Gol- 
den Gate Park and the methods of handling the 
traffic problems in this popular playground. 

The trip was made in three "rubber-neck" coaches 
provided by the Park Commission. Visits were made 
to the California Academy of Science, Stow Lake, 
and the Beach. On their return to Berkeley in the 
evening, the Rangers, whose work is so largely the 
recreational development of the National Forests 
and the handling of mountain travelers and campers, 
w-ere given a flreplace talk by William E. Colby, 
Secretary of the Sierra Club. 

The morning session included an address by Su- 
pervisor Bigelow, Nevada City, on "Service to Recre- 
ationists," a paper by Supervisor Kotok of Placer- 
ville, California, on "Improvement Work,',' with par- 
ticular reference to National Forest roads and trails, 
and a paper by L. A. Barrett of the District Fores- 
ter's office, on the application of modern efficiency 
methods to the recreation development of the Na- 
tional Forests. 

QB 

It is believed by many expert hunters in California 
that the growing of so many thousands of acres of 
rice in the Sacramento and San Joaquin valleys is 
having a peculiar effect on some of the wild ducks. 
Many thousands of birds have been killed, it is said, 
so devoid of flesh as to be little more than skin and 
bone . Close examination of the birds shows that the 
gizzard of each is in an unhealthy condition, the craw 
without sand or grit and the passage from the craw 
to tiie gizzard so attenuated as to apparently prevent 
the passage of food. There is a theory that the birds 
feed greedily on rice without sand or grit to help 
grind the food and thus fail to secure the mixture 
that is needful to proper nourishment. 



There will be a good representative entry of Cali- 
fornia dogs at Westminster show this year. Anoakla 
Kennels are showing six dogs of each of their three 
principal breeds. Airedales, Bulldogs and Russian 
Wolfhounds, says H. M. Robertson in the Kennel 
Review. The dogs go through from the Coast in 
a special train under charge of Chris Shuttleworth. 
It is unlikely that they will take in any of the other 
Eastern flxtures but they have not definitely decided. 
The probability is that they will leave immediately 
after the New York show and take in pasadena show, 
the middle of March, if all is well. 

Mrs. Baldwin's dogs are in great shape meantime 
and ought to do well. It takes a lot of ambition and 
enterprise to enter eighteen dogs and travel them 
three thousand miles, and no matter what honors 
they gain they will be well deserved. 

Martin I. Smith, Jr., is sending through a corking 
good Wire puppy under charge of Billy Coats of 
Vancouver, w-ho judged him at Long Beach. This 
puppy should make a good showing in any sort of 
fast company. He was bred by Mr. Smith at Del 
Rev Kennels, near Venice, and called Del Rey Wy- 
collar Boy, after his illustrious dad. He is out of 
Venus of Paignton, imported from Stephen Plump- 
ton last year. This bitch whelped a marvelous litter 
and is bein.g bred back to Wycollar Boy next time in. 

I have no word of any other Airedales that are to 
brave the journey except those of the Anoakia Ken- 
nels, but if these are taken as representative of Cal- 
ifornia Airedales, and this Wire puppy as an exam- 
ple of the home-bred stuff, it will look like another 
boost for the Golden State. From Lamonda Park 
there will sojourn a lonesome Whippet bitch, Ross- 
moyne Dancing Girl. 

* * * 

The regular quarterly meeting of the Pacific Coast 
Collie Club was held at 1275 Stanyan street, San 
Francisco, on the evening of October 6th, w-ith the 
president, Thomas J. Murray, in the chair. After 
the calling of the roll, the minutes of the previous 
meeting and the treasurer's report were read and 
approved. 

The resolution regarding the reinstatement of the 
Valverde dogs, and the letter which the .secretary 
was in.structed to prepare, was then discussed at 
len<;th, and the following letter and resolution sub- 
mitted: 

"American Kennel Club, New York, N. Y. — Gen- 
tlemen: At a recent meeting of the Pacific Coast 
Collie Club, held in this city, the following resolution 
was presented and unanimously carried, with in- 
structions that the same be presented to your body: 

" 'Resolved, That we petition the American Kennel 
Club for reinstatement of dogs purchased from or 
bred from the Valverde Kennels of California. 

"In presenting this resolution and asking your con- 
sideration of the same, we wish to make clear our 
position in the matter, and the reasons which impel 
us to make such a request. We have no desire that 
the painful and unpleasant memories of the past be 
revived; no one who truly loves a Collie can but re- 
gret that the master mind which directed operations 
at Valverde has been lost to us. There still remains, 
however, a splendid kennel, with the blood and breed- 
ing so much needed in Colliedom. 

"The risk in importing dogs in these days is, as 
you know, a great one. Even the long journey across 
our own continent has seriously to be considered. 
But greater than any financial risk or loss, is the 
tragedy to the Collie lovers here on the coast, that 
right at our doors the greatest Collies of all time are 
imavailable by purchase or for breeding purposes. 
The immortal Anfleld Model and his progeny still 
live at Valverde. May we not perpetuate them? 

"This resolution was presented, considered and 
carried with but one thought of better Collies, and 
saving to the world this royal blood and breeding. 
We most earnestly beg that you, as the parent body 
of the dog fancy, will consider it in the same spirit 
"Respectfully submitted, 
"CALIFORNIA COAST COLLIE CLUB." 

Signed: Thomas J. Murray, president; Mary R. 
Rand, vice-president: Charles Cleveland, director; 
Waller Duncan, director; E. C. Rand, director; Mrs. 
Walter Duncan, secretary. 

The secretary was al.so instructed to send a copy 
of this letter to all Collie clubs in the United States 
and Canada ,and as far as possible to every known 
breeder of show stock. 

% 

S. F. Fly-Casting Club. — San Francisco fly casters 
are planning a big spring tournament at Stow lake 
on February 22. The contests will mark the first ac- 
tivities of the sport for the new year. 

Interest in this sport is increasing, partly due to 
the move of the San Francisco organization to bring 
about a coast-wide association. The plan originated 
with Paul W. Shattuck and has met the approval of 
the .secretaries of other coast clubs. 

A "ladies' night," an annual affair with the local 
club, will provide opportunity for the presentation of 
the trophies which are to be awarded to winners in 
the spring tourney . The date of this dinner is not 
settled, but probably will be on the evening of Feb- 
ruarj 22. 



Saturday, January 27, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



INTERSTATE ASSOCIATION AVERAGES. 



Coast Shooters Rank High For the Season of 1916. 



Breeder and Sportsman: — Following herewith is 
the official Interstate Association list of trapshooting 
averages of Amateurs and Professionals who quali- 
fied in 1916, with names of contestants, total number 
of targets shot at in Registered Tournaments, total 
number of targets scored, and percentages. 

The averages for single targets for both Amateurs 
and Professionals are based on a minimum of 2,000 
targets, as per The Interstate Association ruling to 
that effect. 

The averages for double targets are computed on 
The Interstate Association Tournaments only, and 
they are based on taking part in two tournaments as 
a minimum, as per The Interstate Association ruling 
to that effect. 

THE INTERSTATE ASSOCIATION, 
E. REED SHANER, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Secretary. 

The leading twenty shots of the country with the 
official averages of the shooters on the Pacific Slope 
are as follows: 

Shot. Bke. % 



Harlow, Fred, Newark, Ohio 2010 

Arie, M., Thomasboro, Ills 2400 

Henderson, \V., Lexington, Ky 2650 

King, R. A., Delta, Colo 2000 

Richardson, A. B., Dover, Del 3435 

Bonser, H., Cincinnati, Ohio 2000 

Pendergast, H. J., Phoenix, N. Y 2250 

Peck, C. H., Remington, Ind 2460 

Pfirrmann, H., Jr., Los Angeles, Cal... 2100 

Craper, F. A., Custer Park, Ills 4250 

Jahn, John R., Davenport, la 5660 

Skutt, A. C, Morton, N. Y 2345 

Shuck, C. R., Kempton, Ind 2410 

Newcomb, C. H., Philadelphia, Pa... 5155 

Wright, F. S., Buffalo, N. Y 4260 

Plum, Fred, Atlantic City, N. J 4415 

Livingston, J. R., Springville, Ala. . . 3300 

Spotts, R. L., New York, N. Y 3150 

Melius, F. H., Los Angeles, Cal 2000 

Huckins, L. C, Chicago, Ills 2720 

Troeh, F. M., Vancouver, Wash 2890 

Cocke, A v., Wellington, Tex 2820 

Varner, E. W., Adams, Nebr 2250 

Ford, O. N., San Jose, Cal 6580 

Dodds, J. F., San Diego, Cal 5980 

O'Brien, P. H., Portland, Ore 3080 

Koyen, Albert, Fremont, Neb 4290 

De Mund, H. P., Phoenix, Ariz 2070 

Nash, C. H., San Jose, Cal 2080 

Howard, N. A., Piedmont, Cal 3500 

Niddaugh, H. J., Fremont, Neb 2440 

Seavey, J. W., Portland, Ore 2090 

Siddall, M., Salem, Ore 2190 

Mullen, W. E., Ray ,Ariz 3105 

Martin, Dr. J. L., Fresno, Cal 2500 

Rossbach, V. A., Los Angeles, Cal 2620 

Cline ,H. W., Los Angeles, Cal 2340 

O'Connor, C. A., Spokane, Wash 2350 

Strowger, A. W., Portland, Ore 2640 

Professionals. 

Clark, Homer, Alton, Ills 2100 

German, L. S., Aberdeen, Md 4700 

Crosby, W. R., O'Fallon, Ills 5545 

Spencer, C. G., St. Louis, Mo 5160 

Young, Chas. A., Springfield, Ohio... 3690 

Killam, Art, St. Louis, Mo 6535 

Mitchell, Ed. L., Los Angeles Cal 2200 

Razee, Rush, Curtis, Neb 2190 

Taylor, J. R., Newark, Ohio 4250 

Gibbs, H. D., Union City, Tenn 3050 

Reed, R. C, San Francisco, Cal 2260 

Barre, J. W., Louisiana, Mo 2960 

Graham, E. S., Ingleside, Ills 2500 

Hawkins, J. M., Baltimore, Md 7580 

Kirkwood, H. C, La Grange, Ills 2580 

Reid, L. H., Seattle, Wash 2740 

Poston, H. E., Ban Francisco, Cal 5020 

Holohan, G. E., Los Angeles, Cal 3260 

Hawxhurst, L. S., Oakland, Cal 3380 

Riehl, Frank C, Tacoma, Wash 2690 

Holohan, P. J., Portland, Ore 3640 

Morgan, E. J., Salt Lake City, Utah.. 4325 

Carter, Geo. L., Lincoln, Neb 3250 

Cook, J. A., Oakland, Cal 2160 

Morris, E. B., Portland, Ore 2040 

Bowman, Wm. M., Denver, Col 3490 

Hoyt, Harry A., Los Angeles, Cal 2320 

Stanton, L. A., Denver, Col 2395 

Simmons, E. E., Minneapolis, Minn... 4535 

Haight, C. A., San Francisco, Cal 2870 

Double Targets — Amateurs. 

Troeh, F. M., Vancouver, Wash 120 

Noel, J. H., Nashville, Tenn 60 

Bering, Guy V., Columbus, Wis 130 

Henderson, W., Lexington, Ky 130 

Jones, W. H., Macon, Ga 130 

Larsen, L. C, Greeley, Neb 60 

Tappan, C. C, Hoagland, Neb 130 

Double Targets — Professionals 

Spencer, C. G., St. Louis, Mo 60 54 .9000 

Clancy, R. W., Chicago, Ills 60 50 .8333 

Crosby, W. R., O'Fallon, Ills 60 49 .8166 

Marshall, T. A., Chicago, Ills 60 49 .8166 

Dickey, O. R., Boston, Mass 90 72 .8000 

06 

Du Pont 18-Yard Shoot. — Trapshooters throughout 
the United States will no doubt be interested in some 



1964 
2337 
2572 
1936 
3316 
1020 
2168 
2364 
2017 
4074 
5414 
2243 
2305 
4928 
4070 
4218 
3147 
3003 
1906 
2592 
2751 
2682 
2126 
6206 
5606 
2870 
3980 
1906 
1899 
3167 
2188 
1866 
1945 
2735 
2150 
2251 
2003 
1998 
2147 

2058 
4573 
5367 
4988 
3565 
6310 
2124 
2114 
4101 
2942 
2177 
2840 
2406 
7294 
2482 
2605 
4751 
3070 
3170 
2510 
3373 
3993 
3000 
1950 
1814 
3091 
2040 
2079 
3871 
2410 



105 
50 
105 
104 
101 
41 
83 



.9771 
.9737 
.9705 
.9680 
.9653 
.9645 
.9635 
.9609 
.9604 
.9585 
.9565 
.9565 
.9564 
.9559 
.9553 
.9553 
.9536 
.9533 
.9530 
.9529 
.9519 
.9510 
.9440 
.9431 
.9374 
.9318 
.9277 
.9207 
.9129 
.9048 
.8967 
.8928 
.8881 
.8808 
.8600 
.8591 
.8559 
.8502 
.8132 

.9800 
.9729 
.9678 
.9666 
.9661 
.9655 
.9654 
.9652 
.9649 
.9645 
.9632 
.9625 
.9624 
.9622 
.9620 
.9507 
.9464 
.9417 
.9378 
.9330 
.9266 
.9232 
.9230 
.9069 
.8892 
.8856 
.8793 
.8680 
.8535 
.8397 

.8750 
.8333 
.8076 
.8000 
.7769 
.6833 
.6384 



information relative to the Du Pont 18-yard mark 
Championship Trophy since the last Accumulation 
Purse of ?200 was shot for at the Westy Hogan 
Westy Hogan Tournament in Atlantic City, N. J., 
during the month of September, 1914. The winner 
of the trophy at that shoot was William Foord of 
Wilmington, Del., with the remarkable score of 97x 
100. The historic cup was again placed in competi- 
tion at the Westy Ilogan shoot in September, 1915, 
when it was won by Allen Heil of Allentown, Pa. 
Mr. Heil duplicated Mr. Foord's excellent score in 
winning this trophy. 

With the consent of the Interstate Association the 
cup was next placed in competition during the month 
of July, 1916 at Philadelphia, Pa., on Practice Day 
of the Eastern Handicap. The latte A. B. Richardson 
of Dover. Del., led the field with 97x100. It is inter- 
esting to note that the winner of the last three com- 
petitions was compelled to break 97 in order to cap- 
ture this attractive trophy. 

The cup was shot for last at Atlantic City in Sep- 
tember, 1916, during the annual tournament of the 
Westy Hogans. Seventy shooters entered the con- 
test which wa.s finally won by Geo. N. Fish of Lyn- 
donville, N. Y. Mr. Fish broke 96x100, beating out 
E. L. Bartlett of Baltimore, Md., by two targets. 

These shoots have naturally contributed largely to 
the Accumulation Purse and at the present time 
there is $174.65 in the bank to the credit of the 18- 
Yard Championship Trophy. 

Trapshooters should understand that under the 
conditions governing competitions for the trophy 
they are privileged to challenge Mr. Fish at any 
time. Challenges should be sent to the Du Pont 
Powder Company, Wilmington, Del., who will in turn 
notify the holder of the trophy that he has been 
challenged. The holder of the cup when so advised 
must notify the Du Pont Company within ten days 
of his acceptance of the challenge, naming the place 
and date for the contest that shall not be later than 
forty-five days from the date of challenge notice. 

When a contest for this historic cup is arranged, 
by reason of challenge or otherwise, the event be- 
comes an open competition and all amateurs are 
eligible to compete for the trophy and purse. All 
contests are at 100 single targets, 18 yards rise, and 
targets are thrown full 60 yards. 

The championship cup is the old Du Pont Smoke- 
less Powder Championship Trophy. It was first won 
in 1895 by Fred Gilbert of Spirit Lake, Iowa, at Bal- 
timore, Md. If no challenge is received within a rea- 
sonable time, it should be understood that the Du 
Pont Powder Company reserves the right to call in 
the trophy upon the payment of $10 to the holder 
and to place it in open competition. It is hoped that 
another shoot for this attractive cup may be staged 
shortly in order that the Accumulation Purse may be 
increased from $174.65 to the necessary $200. 

ae 

Averages of Arizona Shooters. — The averages of 
the Arizona shooters during the past season are as 
follows : 

Shot. Bke. Pet. 

Barbara, W. B., Ray 920 785 .8532 

Bertram, W. R., Phoenix 100 36 .3600 

Boyd, W. S., Ray 40 29 .7250 

Batton, C. A 200 182 .9100 

Campbell, H., Flagstaff 20 10 .5000 

Cariisle, J. H., Parker 200 138 .6900 

Cooley, C. P., Holbrook 520 425 .8173 

Crabb, E. H., Flagstaff 120 93 .7750 

Davis, J. H., Ray 400 302 .7550 

De Mund, H. P., Phoenix 2070 1906 .9207 

De Mund, R. P.. Phoenix.- 1120 1050 .9375 

De Mund, C. W., Phoenix 100 73 .7300 

Edens, T. L., Phoenix 1120 1043 .9331 

Feland, R. F., Phoenix 100 61 .6100 

FRinney, W. D 200 169 .8450 

Francis, J. W., Flagstaff 200 166 .8300 

Francis, C. W 20 18 .9000 

Gold, F. M., Williams 200 179 .8950 

Heflin, W. S., Phoenix 920 802 .8717 

Hellemay, W. H., Phoenix 510 441 .8647 

Hughes, K. L., Williams 200 153 .7900 

Jones. .L, Phoenix 120 54 .4416 

Lowe, F. E 80 57 .7125 

Melick, E. W., Williams 200 139 .6950 

Melick, Dr. P. A., Williams 200 194 .9700 

Miller, Geo., Phoenix 100 52 .5200 

Morrell, D. E., Phoenix 1120 961 .8401 

Mullen, W . E., Ray 3105 2735 .8808 

Mullen, C. V 520 363 .6980 

Mullen, A. P., Signal 140 77 .5500 

Mullen, Thad., HilKside 200 168 .8400 

Ortt, C. W., Williams 60 53 .8833 

Patterson, C. S., Williams 200 183 .9150 

Princp, B. B., Phoenix 340 174 .5117 

Smith, C. L., Ray 1120 944 .8428 

Smith, Wyatt, Williams 20 16 .8000 

Staiger, G.. Ray 1120 87'3 .7821 

Sweenev, J. R., William.. s 40 28 .7000 

Twitchell, W. IV, Phoenix 1400 1134 .8100 

Wade, C. v., Williams 40 34 .8500 

oe 

Trade Notes. — The Portland (Me.) Gun Club ush- 
ered in the New Year with an interesting shoot. 
E. A. Randall, the State Champion, wa.s high gun. 
Shooting Nitro Club "Speed Shells" he scored 120x 
125. 

Thirty-six shooters faced the traps of the Thorn- 
burg (Pa.) Gun Club recently. W. A. Smith, shoot- 
ing Nitroa, was high over all with a score of 48x50. 



TRAPSHOOTING FIXTURES. 



August 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 1917— Chicago, Ills.— The 
Interstate Association's Eighteenth Grand Amei^ 
ican Trapshooting Tournament, under the aus- 
pices of the South Shore Country Club Gun Club; 
$4,000 added money. Winner of first place in the 
Grand American Handicap guaranteed $500 and a 
trophy; winner of second place guaranteed $400 
and a trophy; winner of third place guaranteed 
$300 and a trophy; winner of fourth place guaran- 
teed $200 and a trophy, and the winner of fifth 
place guaranteed $100 and a trophy. Numerous 
other trophies will also be awarded. Elmer E. 
Shaner, Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

May 28, 29, 30, 1917— San Jose, Cal.— The Interstate 
Association's Twelfth Pacific Coast Trapshooting 
Tournament, under the auspices of the San Jose 
Gun Club; $1300 added money. Winner of first 
$75 and a trophy, and the winner of third place 
place in the Pacific Coast Handicap guaranteed 
$100 and a trophy; winner of second place guar- 
anteed $75 and a trophy, and the winner of third 
place guaranteed $50 and a trophy. Several other 
trophies will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner, 
Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

OG 

Bids for State Shoot. — Clarence A. Haight an- 
nounces that bids for the California-Nevada shoot 
will remain open until February 15. Any club desir- 
ing to hold the attractive event is invited to get in 
line before it is too late. The directors of the asso- 
ciation will meet at that time and formally make the 
award. 

So far Del Monte and Los Angeles have declared 
their desire to hold the event. Del Monte .where 
traps have been installed, has been anxious to at- 
tract the scatter gun artists and Los Angeles papers 
carry the information that the Los Angeles club will 
make a bid for the state title shoot. 

If Los Angeles gets the shoot it will be pulled off 
early in May, according to the reports, while Del 
Monte will likely wait until June or July when the 
Pacific Coast handicap will be finished at San Jose. 

Interest is running high over the selection of the 
place to be named. Last year at San Jose a large 
gatherin.g of shooters was attracted and the events 
were very interesting. Heine Pfirrmann performed 
the feat of breaking 100 straight to carry off the hon- 
ors and the competition was close and exciting all 
the way. 

oe 

Seattle Association. — With a frosty, snappy day 
that added considerable zest to the sport, a good- 
sized bunch of gun bugs turned out for one of the 
most enjoyable shoots of the season on January 17. 
New shooters were much in evidence as well as 
several old-time shooters who turned out for the first 
time in several months. 

D. Rhodes, professional, surprised the bunch by 
shooting high score in the fifty target event after 
an absence from the firing line of several months. 
Tom Wilkes and J. H. Hopkins stacked up the high 
amateur score, both hitting forty-seven out of the 
bunch. Hopkins stood high man in the hundred 
event with a ninety-four. Tom Wilkes and D. Rhodes 
were in second position in this race with ninety- 
three each. 

Some of the new shooters who have started in the 
fascinating sport are, J. H. Davis, J. A. Fortier, A. 
F. Hale, C. F. Reinhard, O. F. Weaver and J. H. 
McDiarmid. R. J .Ovington of Lake Crescent, Wash., 
turned out for the first time at the traps since the 
early eighties. 

Portland was well represented by the genial pro- 
fessional known as Pete Holohan. The scores: — 

At 50 targets— D. Rhodes* 48, Tom Wilkes 47, J. 
H. Hopkins 47, Pete Holohan* 46, C. E. McKelvey 
45, Ed Jones 45, Ralph Kinzer 44, C. W. Bandy 43. 
Hi Follerich 42, Jno. Ruppe 40, W. B. Taft 36, E. J. 
Ovington 35, J. A. Fortier 31, J. H. Davis 29. Geo. 
Scripture 27, C. F. Reinhard 20, A. F. Hale 16. 

At 100 targets— J. H. Hopkins 94, Tom Wilkes 93, 
D. Rhodes* 93, C. E. McKelvey 92, Ed Jones 92, Pete 
Holohan^ 88, Hi Follerich 79, W. B. Taft 71, J. A. 
Fortier 65, J. H. Davis 65, J. H. McDiarmid 45, F. O. 
Weaver 29. 

QG 

Alameda Elks' Club. — At an enthusiastic meeting 
of the Alameda Elks' Gun Club on Monday night offi- 
cers were elected for the ensuing year and plans out- 
lined for a busy season at the traps. The club, which 
was; organized last year with a membership of fifty- 
nine, will hold monthly tournaments throughout the 
year. The members also decided to apply to the 
Interstate As.sociation for a registered shoot on the 
Alameda grounds on Sunday, April 29. The club will 
use the first Sunday in each month for its events, 
starting the season on March 4. 

Former officers who handled the gun affairs so 
well the first year, were re-elected, with Tom Hast- 
ings as president, Henry Meinecke vice-president, 
Fred Hlllyer secretary, Tay Croll assistant secretary 
and treasurer; Bray Thorning, field captain; Charles 
Linderman, Al Dumey. Pedro Martine, Bill Ellis, Lou 
Schroeder and Bob Vallow, board of directors. 

oe 

The annual meeting of the Portland Rifle Club was 
held at the armory January 14. and the following offi- 
cers were elected: President, Dr. G. Earle Henton; 
vice-president, Norman Schmitt; secretary, J. S. 
Hyatt; treasurer, H. V. McDonald; range officer, B. 
D. Ritter. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1917 



* * 

I Sportsmen's Row j 

Al Durney, the enthusiastic member of the Alameda 
Elks' Gun Club, left Wednesday for Honolulu on the 
steamer Matsonia. Before departing Durney made 
an effort to have the steamship officials install a 
trap aboard the ship so that the alluring trapshooting 
sport could be enjoyed on the ocean. Al argued that 
the sport would arouse interest aboard ship and at 
the same time give the shots a chance to try their 
eye. Shooting targets from steamers is nothing new 
but it has not been taken up very extensively out 
here and there is a big field. 

lit is not often in these days of keen competition 
that we see an 11-year-old dog winning at bench 
shows and field trials, but such was the unique rec- 
ord of the Llewellyn setter Count Gladstone's Glad, 
owned by R. L. Keesler of Harrisburg, Pa. Count 
Gladstone's Glad won first in the bench show held in 
connection with the Pennsylvania grouse trials in 
November in a class that brought forth some twenty- 
odd dogs, and then came to the field the next day and 
won second in the All-Age Stake and was runner-up 
in the Grouse Championship. Count Gladstone's Glad 
is one of the few surviving sons of Champion Lady's 
Count Gladstone, and he represents a line of blood 
that breeders of Llewellyn setters are cherishing 
with jealous care, for they realize that this blood is 
absolutely necessary to preserve the "fountain-head" 
of the strain. The dog, despite his years, is as young 
looking as a three-year-old. 

* * * 

The Ontario Government has this season reduced 
the fee for hunting licenses, granted to non-residents 
of the province, from $50 to $25. With the magnifi- 
cent sporting opportunities in the "Highlands of On- 
tario," and throughout the newly opened territory 
along the line of the Transcontinental, the season 
of 1916 should see a large increase in the number 
of visiting hunters. 

* * * 

A rabbit with six legs, all perfectly formed, and all 
"in working order" was born on the beautiful estate 
of W. Marrigan, Polard Plains Park, Port Arthur, in 
August last. The rabbit is pure white, of the Dutch 
breed, both its parents being white also. If it lives 
it should prove a very valuable pet. 

Hugh Poston has been having a time of it getting 
on his feet, but he is up and about and is looking for- 
ward to setting another high mark for 1917. 

Members of the California Fish and Game Commis- 
sion are mourning the death of Paul Smith, a deputy 
connected with the commission for five years, who 
died late last week of appendicitis. Smith was well 
known in Del Norte and Sonoma counties and in Los 
Banos. where he had served as game warden. He 
was known as a hard and faithful worker. Smith, 
who leaves a widow and child, was the sixth member 
of the commission to die inside of six months. 

* * * 

Dr. E. W. Morse of Portland, Ore., is being con- 
gratulated on the recovery of his promising poung 
English setter, "Rowdy," from an attack of distem- 
per. "Rowdy" was runner-up in the Oregon Derby, 
and might have been the winner had his handler not 
been taken ill. He gives promise of training on, and, 
should he develop as his owner expects, he will be a 
hard dog to beat next year. "Rowdy" is by Chicken 
Chops — Trixie IL He is coming back strong after 
his recent illness, and will be given light work by 
his trainer during the winter. 

* * * 

If a good breeding season is experienced this sea- 
son in Utah the sportsmen of Ogden will enjoy some 
grand quail shooting next autumn, as there are now 
more birds in the east foothills than for many years. 
A. H. Moyes of Ogden, deputy game warden, has re- 
cently made trips to the foothills to feed the birds 
and says he finds them very numerous. 

* * * 

Every gim club should become a member of a local 
league if possible. If this cannot be done, arrange 
team shoots with neighboring clubs in which every 
member will be permitted to participate and the 
scores of the five or ten high men to count as the 
club's team score. If this is out of the question, each 
week appoint two of your members team captains, 
divide the members of your club equally as possible 
in shooting strength and shoot a team race. Such 
action will create new interest in the club and bring 
out the members regularly. 

* * * 

The annual report of state game warden Hedrick 
of South Dakota shows that over 200 tons of rough 
fish were seined out of the waters of the state the 
past year, the work being done under the supervis- 
ion of the fish and game department. 

* * * 

The annual banquet of the San Francisco Striped 
Bass Club was held in a Mission banquet hall on 
Jan. 25th. Jack Wallace was in charge of the com- 
mittee arranging for the event and drew up a 
menue on which individually baked striped bass was 
a feature. 



H. Wheeler Perce of Chicago, for many years prom- 
inently identified with the casting game, died sud- 
denly Saturday, January 6, at 1 a. m., from heart 
trouble. Mr. and Mrs. Perce were returning home 
from a social gathering when Mr. Perce was sud- 
denly taken violently ill. He was removed from the 
elevated train and taken to the Palmer House, where 
he died a few minutes later. 

The Del Monte Trapshooters' Association, J. F. 
Neville, secretary, has affiliated with the American 
Amateur Trapshooters' Association. There were 
thirty-four new clubs taken in during the month of 
December. The Cedar Lake shooting club of Cedar 
Falls, Washington, R. S. Whaley secretary, was 
among those that joined. 

* t * 

Manager Pete Ashcroft is getting the Alameda 
grounds into shape to open up the local trapshooting 
season around February 10th. 

* * * 

At a meeting of a handful of Ventura sportsmen 
to discuss the proposal of an all-the-year-round open 
season for steelheads in tide water the oipnion was 
expressed by Assemblyman Joseph Aagabrite that 
any such changes would have to be approved by the 
Fish and Game Commission before the legislature 
would feel justified in enacting them. 

Los Angeles Club. — The cool, brisk weather Sun- 
day seemed to be to trapshooters' liking, and as <i 
result close to forty shooters were in attendance and 
contested for the Owen Council trophy. The hand- 
some prize was captured by Lew Melius, who smash- 
ed 90x100 targets from the nineteen-yard mark. 

Six professionals finished with better scores than 
Melius, but their shooting, as usual, went for naught. 
Frank Riehl and Al Cook, two visiting pros from San 
Francisco, had the high scores of the day. Both 
smashed 93x100 targets. 

Heine Pfirrmann tried hard to win the Council cup, 
but failed. The best the Dutchman could do was to 
smash 88x100. Pfirrmann was anxious to win the 
Council cup because, a few weeks ago. Council cap- 
tured the Pfirrmann trophy. Both being sporting 
goods salesmen, it was a peculiar incident that Coun- 
cil should capture his fellow salesman's cup. Pfirr- 
mann tried to return the compliment, but failed. 

William Kennedy won the solid golf take home 
trophy in the first string of twenty-five. He had a 
straight score.. In the second event at twenty-five 
targets for a take home trophy Heine Pfirrmann and 
Owen Evans tied ,each having a score of 24x25. In 
the shoot-off for the prize Pfirrmann was the victor. 
He smashed twenty straight, while Evans missed one 
target. 

Fish won the take home trophy with a straight run 
of twenty-five. In the fourth event at twenty-five 
targets, Micka and Dunn tied with 23x25. In the 
shoot-off for the prize Dunn won by breaking twenty 
straight. 

Following are the scores: 
—Frank Riehl, 16 yards, broke 93; F. H. Teeple 18— 
93, J. A .Cook 16—92, Ed Mitchell 16—91, G. Holohan 
16—91, L. R. Melius 19—90, H. Pfirrmann 20—88, L. 
J. Micka 20—88, J. N. Dunn 19—88, Roy Witman 19— 
87, O. Evans 20—84, F. M. Gibson 18—84, R. O. Pool 
16—84, C. W. Fish 21—83, W. H. Carnahan 16—83, 

E. C. Grossman 16—83, W. A. Cornelius 20—82, C. W. 
Clement 18—82, A. Pachmayr 16—81, O. Council 20— 
79, E. K. Mohler 21—78, W. A. Hillis 21—78, H. E. 
Sargent 18—78, F. H. Hall 17—78, C. Blackstock 18— 
77, H. Cline 18—76, Mrs. Pfirrmann 16—74, V. A. 
Rossbach 18—73, E. Goiter 16—48, D. R. Dickey 16— 
55, O. F. Meilicki 18—53x75, O. D. Ashton 16—52x75, 

F. Free 18—50x75, E. W. Selbach 16—50x75, William 
Kennedy 16—58x75, J. G. Griffith 16—32x50, M. Steel 
16—31x50, F. C. Patton 16—29x50, G. L. Pulley 16— 
23x25, Mrs. Grossman 16—22x25, J. H. Bishop Jr. 21— 
18x25, "Wally Robb 16—12x25. 

OG 

Vernon Club — A large crowd of trapshooters at- 
tended the weekly shOot of the Vernon Gun Club 
Sunday, and despite the cool wind some very excel- 
lent scores were made. Dr. Packard, after a lay-off 
fro mtrapshooting for a short time, did a come-back 
Sunday and won the gold bar for the high run. He 
smashed 48x50. 

Stanton Bruner was a very close runner-up with 
46x50 smashes. The real high gun for the day was 
A. W. Bruner. He made a score of 49x50, but as he 
is a professional his score did not count. In the prac- 
tice event Bob Bole and Stanton Bruner were high. 
Each contestant broke 47x50 targets. 



Following are the complete scores: 

Hdcp. Trophy Practice 



S. .\. Bruner , 


20 


46 


47 


C. E. Groat 


,18 


43 


20 




18 


41 


20 


J. D. Dierdoff 


18 


43 


23 




16 


36 


21 


J .W. Meek 


17 


42 


42 




20 


48 


44 


Bob Bole 


17 


43 


47 


William Pugh 


18 


45 


46 




16 


49 


24 




16 


32 






16 




36 


Pollv McLarry 


16 




20 




, , , , 16 




21 




, 16 




19 




18 


43 


23 




16 







HERE IS SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT. 



Where Are the 10,000 Elk That Were Once in this 
Country? 



Consider the elk, my son. 

When the first white man settled in what is now 
the United States there were, according to calcula- 
tions made by Ernest T. Seton, based on twenty 
years' research, 10,000,000 elk in this country. In the 
days of Daniel Boone they were more than plentiful 
in Kentucky and neighboring states. Naturally these 
elk, as well as the buffalo, being of good size and 
fair flavor, made up the principal meat supply of the 
people. It is fit and proper that native wild animals 
be used for food under such circumstances, so the 
decrease in elk cannot be blamed entirely on the 
early settlers — people long dead, and for this reason 
on whom we like to shift the blame for our own near- 
sightedness in game protection. 

Dr. Hornaday ,director of the New York Zoo, who 
has done much good work in the cause of conserva- 
tion, says: "There is no reason, except man's 
shortsighted greed and his foolishness, why there 
are not today 100,00 Oelk living in the Allegheny 
mountains, furnishing each year 50,000 three-year- 
old males as free food (and noble quarry) for the 
people. By sensible management the Rocky moun- 
tains, the Sierra Nevadas, and the coast range would 
support enough wild elk to feed a million people." 
Emerson Hough says that elk were killed as late as 
1865 at Spirit Lake, Iowa, but now look what we 
have: less than 60,000 on the whole North American 
continent, according to Hornaday. 

It is true that the early settlers and "civilization" 
are partly to blame, but not nearly as much as our 
American happy-go-lucky, not to say boob, proclivi- 
ties. The hundreds killed by sportsmen and tusk 
hunters in recent years cuts a bigger figure in our 
supply than did the hundreds of thousands killed by 
our granddads. 

It was only a few years ago that bands of elk 
were driven from Yellowstone Park by snow and 
lack of feed only to be slaughtered, does and young- 
sters along with the older males, by 80-called "sports- 
men." 

It seems to be the general impression that in order 
to be a conservationist one must necessarily be a 
"muck raker," a "gloomster," and a rabid "long 
hair," but such is not the case with us— we like to 
show the good with the bad. Consequently, we take 
pleasure in telling those who do not know that the 
grand lodge of the B. P. O. E. has passed a resolution 
discouraging the wearing of elks teeth as emblems. 

The Elks we know personally are kindly, intelli- 
gent men — just about the last folks in the world who 
would knowingly injure anybody or anything — and 
for this reason we have often wondered at their 
thoughtlessness in encouraging tusk hunters, the 
most ignoble beasts that stalk about the earth today. 
Possibly they are not aware of the fact that thou- 
sands of elk have been killed for their tusks alone 
and the carcasses left to rot. 

So let's not weep over the past, sad as it may be, 
but be thankful for the elk that are thus saved by 
the action of the grand lodge. 

Portland Club. — Henry R. Everding successfully 
defended the W. C. Bristol 20-gauge gun trophy 
against a field of twenty contestants, including the 
donor himself, on January 14th. Mr. Bristol, how- 
ever, is not a contender for the trophy. 

Everding pulverized 20 out of 25 targets thrown 
for him. C. C. Kelley came within one bird of tying 
Everding's score, while Frank Templeton, who issued 
the challenge, broke but 16 targets. 

A 25-bird memorial event in honor of E. B. Van 
Arnam, the local professional who passed away a 
week ago, brought out a field of 36 nimrods. Dennis 
Holohan of Burley, Idaho, was high man in the event 
with a perfect score. J. W. Seavey was second, 
dropping but one bird, and Frank Troeh, the national 
champion, was third. 

A. L. Tippett, a prominent sportsman of Deer 
Lodge, Mont., participated in the event and broke 
20 out of 25 targets. 

The scores of the E. B. Van Amam Msmorial 
event of 25 targets: — Dennis Holohan 25, J. W. Sea- 
vey 24, Frank Templeton 23, F. M. Troeh 23, R. P. 
Knight 22, Abner Blair 22, P. P. Bull 22, A. Woelm 
21, S. E. Bird 21, C. C. Follett 21, H. R. Everding 21, 
A. L. Tippett 20, H. A. Pollock 20, Dr. L. L. DuBols 
20, E. L. Youmans 19, J. C. Morris 19, E. E. Redfleld 
19, E. H. Keller 19, A. L. Zachrisson 19, W. B. Honey- 
man 18, O .J. Clossett 18, C. C. Kelley 18, L. L. Mulit 
17, Al Sequin 17, J. S. Crane 17, B. J. Boone 17, Ed 
Long 16, A. W. Strowger 16, A. R. Parrott 16, Dr. L. S. 
Besson 15, R. E. Martell 14, Dr. A. J. Brock 14, J. K. 
Simpson 14, W. C. Bristol (20-gauge) 13, C. Meach 
11, A. Erickson 10. 

Following are the scores registered in the 20-gauge 
event:— Everding 20, Kelley 19, Holohan 18, Zachris- 
son 17, Bristol 17, Follett 16, Templeton 16, Youmans 
16, Seavey 15, Blair 15, Bull* 15, Clossett 14, Boone 
14, I'ollock 14, Knight 12, Honeyman 11, Parrott 10, 
Simpson 10, Bird 10, Strowger 10, Keller 8. 

OS 

The hunting season is rapidly drawing to a close. 
Most of the boys got in their sport before the first of 
the year, but some of them have been getting good 
bags of late. 



Saturday, January 27, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



NEW FIGHTING SWORDFISH OF PACIFIC. 

Sportsmen at Catallna Are Worried by Appearance 
of New Species 

By W. T. PAYNE. 
(Author of "Game Birds and Game Fishes of the 
Pacific Coast.") 

The appearance in large numbers in the waters of 
Catalina of a swordfish new to the California coast 
has created a lively interest among the expert ang- 
lers who are alv. ays looking for the most determined 
fighters of the sea with which to match their skill. 

This new and powerful fighter has, very naturally, 
created no end of discussion as to what it really is, 
what is its relationship to the Atlantic swordflsh and 
to the resident fish of a similar character, long 
known as the California swordfish. 

The common resident of the Catalina waters, and 
very appropriately given the English name, Califor- 
nia swordflsh. by Jordan and Evermann, has been 
classed as a member of the genus Tetrapturus, found 
on the Atlantic coasts and in the waters of Japan. 
I have illustrated and described this fish in "Game 
Birds and Game Fishes of the Pacific Coast," under 
the name used by Jordan and Evermann, Tetraptu- 
rus mitsukurii, as it is supposed to be one of the 
species inhabiting the Japanese waters. But there 
is at least some question whether or not this fish is 
the mitsukurii of Japan. I am led to the entertain- 
ment of this doubt by the fact that none of the illus- 
trations or descriptions of the mitsukurii that I have 
yet seen, either show or describe the two long "feel- 
ers" which are, in fact, ventral fins, so prominent in 
the Catalina fish; nor do the descriptions of it cor- 
respond in many other respects. I may here state, 
however, that but little is known of any of the spe- 
cies of the families Istiophoridae or Xiphiidae, which 
include the sword, spear and sailfishes. It is there- 
fore possible that a better study of the California 
swordfish (Tetrapturus mitsukurii) may show it to 
be as distinct a species as is the new visitor to our 
coast, and possibly separate it from the Tetrapturus 
to which the spearfishes belong. I am led to this 
opinion also by the behavior of the fish when im- 
paled. ■ It is the most determined and spectacular 
fighter known to the anglers in any part of the world. 
In its struggles for freedom it fights constantly on 
the surface, and in its mad rushes to free itself from 
the impaling hook leaps clear into the air thirty, 
forty and even sixty times before its strength and 
courage are exhausted, a fighting courage never even 
approached by any other fish. The tuna, while a 
hard fighter, wearies the angler by its strong, steady 
work below the surface. The trout and salmon, after 
one to three angry leaps, settle down to erratic under- 
water runs. The tarpon, once considered the king 
of fighting fishes, rarely, if ever, shows itself half 
a dozen times above the surface. But the California 
swordflsh enters the contest with the spirit of the 
Roman gladiator, with its heart in the battle, and 
with a determination to fight to the very finish. 

An examination of the illustrations of the two 
swordfishes, the Xiphias gladias of the Atlantic and 
the new Catalina visitor, to which I have given the 
name Pacific swordfish, will show a very marked 
difference in the length of the sword, the length of 
the under jaw, the shape and size of the dorcal fin, 
the location of the pectoral fins, the size of the eye, 
and the presence of a large anterior anal fin in the 
Pacific fish which is entirely absent in the Xiphias. 

The swordflsh of the Atlantic is fairly well known 
to our scientific men, and described alike by them 
all. Its habitat is given as both sides of the Atlantic 
Ocean, and its supposed spawning grounds as the 
Mediterranean. None of our writers on the subject, 
so far as I am able to learn, seem to have any knowl- 
edge of a species of swordfish distinguished from the 
Xiphias of the Atlantic, except Gunther, who writes 
of a type inhabiting the warm waters of the Pacific 
and Indian oceans. In writing of these he says: 
"Many of the young fishes are c^^.ught in the nets of 
the native islanders, but the mature fishes are too 
strong for any net." An assertion easily believed 
after an examination of its powerful fins. He de- 
scribes these fishes as "distinguished from the At- 
lantic Xiphias by the presence of ventral fins which, 
however, are reduced to long styloform appendages," 
but he does not mention their location. He classes 
them under the generic name Histiophorus, but it 
seems he has not been sufficiently conversant with 
them to give them specific names. Nor does he de- 
scribe the species herein discussed. For it, unlike 
his histiaphorus, has no ventral fins, and unlike the 
Atlantic Xiphias it has a very large, fleshy anterior 
anal fin. 

Jordan and Evermann, speaking of the Atlantic 
swordflsh, the Xiphias gladias, say: "It is rare on 
the Paciflc coast, only five records being known." 
And in mentioning their value as food fishes, they 
say: "Its dark flesh, though a little coarse, makes 
excellent steaks." These well known authorities also 
indorse the statement made by others that but little 
Is known of this family of fishes because of its in- 
convenient size for laboratory work. In view of 
these statements it is quite possible that the five 
records mentioned were reports furnished them by 
fishermen, and not actual examinations made by 
themselves, for they are too careful observers not to 
have noticed the marked difference between the dor- 
sal fin of the California swordflsh, or the new visitor, 
and those of the Xiphias of the Atlantic. Also the 
presence of the large, fleshy anterior anal fin in both 



of these Pacifls species, which they well knew was 
entirely absent from the Atlantic species. If, then, 
as I have assumed, the flve records were furnished 
by fishermen who mistook the California swordfish 
for the Atlantic Xiphias, it will account for the state- 
ment that the flsh is "dark and a little coarse," which 
is the case with the California swordfish. Whereas 
the flesh of the Atlantic species is quite light col- 
ored, while that of the new visitor is absolutely 
white and almost devoid of grain, and so delicate 
that in the language of one angler, "It melts in the 
mouth like a caramel." 

This new Paciflc swordfish, which has caused so 
much discussion, is, as will be seen by a glance at 
its large, heavy fins, a powerful swimmer. The larg- 
est one yet landed weighed 404 pounds, but speci- 
mens have been hooked though, not landed, that 
when brought to the surface, were estimated to 
weigh fully 600 pounds or more. 

Avoiding the technical style of the naturalist, this 
fish may be described as a large, powerful fish, reach- 
ing a weight of 600 pounds or more. Color, dark 
green above, with a metallic luster .shading to 
silver>- below; upper jaw extending into a hard, 
bony sword, four or five inches wide at the base and 
tapering to about one inch wide by a quarter of an 
inch thick at its point, and in length about three- 
fourths of the length of the body, measured from the 
eye to the base of the tail; under jaw sharp and 
pointed and about one-fifth the length of the sword; 
dorsal fin three to four inches thick at the base, 
a little higher than the depth of the body, fleshy like 
that of the shark, rising aburptly from the head a 
little in front of the gills and about one-half the 
width of its length; second dorsal unconnected with 
the first and reduced to a mere adipose teat close to 
the tail; pectoral fins longer than the depth of the 
body and located on the throat just under the gills; 
ventral fins absent; anterior anal fin thick and 
fleshy, located about half way between the pectorals 
and the base of the tail and nearly as wide as it is 
long; posterior anal fln very small and about half 
way between the anterior and the base of the tail 
and without the two spiny points of the Atlantic 
species; flukes of the tail very ling, thick and pow- 
erful; eye brilliant light blue and very large with a 
hard crystal encased in a movable bone cup ;skin 
smooth, oily and without scales. 

This species quite likely belongs to Gunther's 
Ocean type to which he has given the generic name, 
Histiophorus, although he has failed to describe this 
species . Nor can I find any mention of it in any of 
the authorities at my command. I can, therefore, 
draw but one conclusion, and that is, that it is a type 
heretofore unknown. 

QG 

Arguing Over Quail. — Some sportsmen with best 
intentions are advocating a return to the old short- 
season plan of protecting quail, based upon an ap- 
parent scarcity in their immediate neighborhood. 

The state game authorities say the extension of the 
season from one to two and a half months was a vin- 
dication of the promise made several years ago to 
restore the shooters their longer open period when- 
ever a sufficient stock had been built up by the 
drastic legislation to permit maintaining the supply. 
Therefore the legislature of 1915 was advised to ex- 
tend the season in the South. Rather than reduce 
it generally because of a limited local condition, the 
argument has been advanced that an extension of the 
powers of the fish and game authorities by giving 
them right to arbitrarily curtail the open seasons 
would better meet the possible emergencies of dry 
seasons developing in between legislatures and al- 
lowing breeding stock to be shot off before the law- 
makers could act. 

Many sportsmen shot their limits the last two days 
of the season of 1916 and general opinion among ex- 
perts is that the year ended with plenty of quail left 
for breeding. 

Quail shooting is so particularly a California sport- 
ing asset, typical of the country, that all the exer- 
cise of the privilege possible is thought wise, but the 
breeding stock must be maintained. Given that and 
good seasons there will always be plenty of -quail. 

Even sportsmen are at times inclined to place all 
blame for scarcity of game upon the gun, forgetting 
that the gun never drained marshes or plowed up 
the brushy uplands that made the best hunting 
grounds. Posting has been a great factor also; quail 
shooting upon many of the present ranches has not 
improved at all, and very little shooting is done upon 
most of them. It seems the nature of quail not to 
increase beyond a certain point, whether shot or not. 
* * * 

Bill Against Spears. — Sacramento, Cal. — Abolilion 
of the use of the spear in catching steelhead salmon 
is the intent of a bill which was introduced in the 
Senate by Senator Herbert W. Slater of Sonoma 
county this week. 

That the bill will be fought stoutly by fishermen 
in Slater's own district was admitted by hini. Inter- 
est in this bill is augmented by the fact that Slater 
is chairman of the Fish and Game Committe of the 
St nate. 

Senator Slater says he was moved to an attempt 
to abolish the use of the spear for the reason that 
the steelhead salmon is decreasing to an alarming 
extent. As hundreds of fishermen who use the spear 
live in Slater's district, the fight against the bill 
probably will be spirited. 

Representatives of the Truckee Fihermen's Union 
appeared before the Senate Fish and Game Commit- 



tee this week to protest against the introduction of 
a bill prohibiting the sale of Tahoe trout. The fisher- 
men's committee was assured that if the bill appeared 
it probably would be killed. Chairman Slater said 
that no bill for the prevention of the use of salmon 
eggs as bait would be introduced in the 191? legis- 
lature. 

Casters Going East. — The fly and bait casters of 
the Southern California Rod and Reel club will hold 
their regular monthly casting tournament at the 
Eastlake park grounds a week from Sunday. This 
tournament next month is expected to prove one of 
the best held this season, for the casters are just 
getting warmed up. 

In the tourney last month some very good marks 
resulted in the varoius events. The casters now have 
something to try for good marks, for the present 
indications are that at least three of the local fly and 
bait casters will be sent east this year to take part 
in the national tournament. 

Sherman Baker, Oscar Lane and E. J. Kennedy 
are the Three men who are expected to make the 
trip. All are experienced casters and have equaled 
some of the national records in the tourneys at East- 
lake park. 

Both fly and bait events will be down on the pro- 
gram for the tournament, and with good weather 
nothing but good marks are expected. 

QG 

Seattle After Game Warden. — Seattle, Wash. — The 
sportsmen of King county, and have been for the 
last few weeks, taking a very keen and active inter- 
est in the administration of the county game war- 
den's office, which includes the propagation of game 
birds and fish, as well as the enforcement of game 
laws. 

Sportsmen cite the fact that King Is the richest 
county in the state, but that it is the poorest in the 
amount of game birds and flsh at the present time. 
They contend that they should have as many game 
birds and flsh as any other county in the state, espe- 
cially in view of the fact that there is spent annually 
about .?17,000 . This amount is secured through the 
sale of hunting and fishing licenses and not by tax- 
ing the general public. This is a great deal more 
than is spent by any other county in the state. The 
sportsmen believe that they are entitled to consid- 
eration in the selection of the game warden and his 
deputies and in the administration of that office. 

At a recent meeting held jointly by the Seattle 
Trapshooters' Association, the Green Lake Gun Club 
and the Seattle Fly and Bait Casting Club, many mat- 
ters of interest were discussed pertaining to the con- 
duct o fthe game warden's office and to the deplor- 
able conditions of flelds and streams. It was unani- 
mously agreed by those present to advocate an entire 
change of administration in that office and the ap- 
pointment of E. J. Beach as game warden and E. E. 
Bonn as second choice, or chief deputy. Since that 
meeting the Seattle Rifle and Revolver Association 
has joined the movement. Each of these organiza- 
tions has respectively petitioned the King county 
game commissioners to grant its requests. 

The commissioners also were presented with a pe- 
tition containing the signature of approximately 1200 
sportsmen, urging the appointment of Beach and 
Bonn, as indorsed by the clubs. 

The ppirit of the movement on the part of the 
clubs and sportsmen is for the purpose of assisting 
the commissioners in the selection of highly compe- 
tent officials and they believe that their request has 
been kindly received and will be granted. 

00 

Handicap Committee. — Editor Breeder and Sports- 
man; — Please announce in the Trap Department of 
"Breeder and Sportsman" that the committee which 
will allot handicaps to entrants in the coming Grand 
American Handicap is constituted as follows: Guy 
V. Dering, Chairman, Columbus, Wis.; Geo. K. 
Mackie, Lawrence, Kans.; Ben S. Donnelley, Chicago, 
Ills.; W. H. Cochrane, Bristol, Tenn.; Fred Plum, At- 
lantic City, N. J. 

Yours very truly, 

THE INTERSTATE ASS'N, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. E. REED SHANER, Sec'y. 

The first registered shoot to be held by Denver 
Trap club under the auspices of the Interstate Asso- 
ciation will be Sunday, May 6, in which there are 
expected about seventy-five participants . The Inter- 
state Association will contribute $1,')0 in merchandise 
and cash prizes, to which will be added a sum of |50 
by the Denver Trap club, so now is the time for all 
to get out and commence to practice for this event. 

* * * 

Santa Barbara county has discontinued the office 
of game and fish warden, owing to the efficient work 
done in that vicinity by Deputy Fish and Game Com- 
missioner Henry J. Abels of Santa Maria. Several 
other counties co-operate with the Fish and Game 
Commission in sharing theexpenses of patrol work 
which in the past has made Itposslble in several In- 
stances to maintain deputies in counties. 

* * * 

Fish and Game Commission field patrol deputies 
have been instructed to take nothing but the exhibi- 
tion of a license as evidence of the issuance of one, 
hunters and fishermen be ing required by the law 
not only to have procured their license but to exhibit 
them to any warden or duly qualified peace officer 
upon demand; and one cannot exhibit anything 
without having It with him. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1917 



I Stock and Farm Department | 

The two-day sale of Holstein-Friesians recently 
held at the Liverpool, N. Y., pavilion netted an aver- 
age of ?4r)0. The highest price was $3,500, which 
was paid for Woodcrest Ina DeKol 4th, a four-year- 
old with a record of 34 pounds of butter in seven 
days. Rdward H. Witte, Kansas City, Mo., bought 
her for his slock farm at Independence, Mo. 

❖ ❖ ♦ 

The second annual public sale of the Ohio Short- 
horn Breeders' Association, conducted at Columbus, 
Ohio, January 10, resulted in the sale of 127 head 
for ?30,040. 

<8> * 

Nothing better has ever happened to the dairy in- 
terest than the great advertising campaign now being 
carried on in all national magazines, in which milk 
as a food is being brought to the attention of the 
consumer. Wise will be the breeder of good dairy 
cattle who will see and grasp his opportunity, when 
he realizes that this great wave of education on the 
value of milk as a food will sweep the country. Cali- 
fornia and the coast states are prepared. Her dairy 
interests are now the most important of all live stock 
afifairs. 

^ ^ <•■> 

Exercise for Hogs in Winter. 

In cold weather a colt or a calf will hustle around 
on its own account and get plenty of exercise just 
for the fun there is in it, if given room. But a pig 
is lazy, and if the weather is a little chilly will not 
come out of its warm nest except to eat. It is more 
diflicult to make young fall pigs exercise than it is 
tho.<?e born in warmer weather. They shun the cold 
and avoid any unnecessary exertion. Accordingly 
their blood runs more sluggishly, which makes them 
feel the cold more and also prohibits the body from 
assimilating the food most efficiently. Probably no 
one thing is responsible for so much trouble with 
pigs at this time of year as the direct and indirect 
effects of too little exercise. One way to remedy 
this condition is to make them march the length of 
their pasture lot or enclosure for their feed. House 
them at one end and feed them at the other. Colony 
houses make this arrangement easy. They want to 
eat and they want to sleep. The involuntary walk 
between does the trick. 

Keep the Tried Brood Sows. 

While the practice of selling young sows before 
one really knows their value is not followed as often 
by the breeder as by the market producer, neverthe- 
less this is sometimes the case. 

There have been many times when a breeder 
would give several times the market value could he 
only get back a sow that had proved her value in a 
litter developed after she had gone to market. 

Aside from the fact that the old, well-selected sow 
generally does better for one, some figures recently 
gotten together at this station show that the old sow 
produces more pigs per litter in later litters than in 
her earlier ones 

Of the 34 sows which have raised five or more lit- 
ters in the station herd, the following is the average 
number of pigs farrowed: 

First litter, number of pigs, 7.09; second, 8.64; 
third, 8.87; fourth, 9.83; fifth, 9.62. 

While it is generally recognized that the young 
sow will raise a greater percentage of the pigs far- 
rowed than the old sow, the number will not be so 
large nor the vitality and ability as when the sows 
of known value are used. — [J. B. Rice, Illinois Eperi- 
ment Station. 

Choosing a Stallion. 

As spring approaches, the progressive farmer is 
confronted with the problem of choosing a stallion 
to which to breed. In many cases it is merely a 
question of eliminating the worst, as there are some 
communities that are not supplied with a good stal- 
lion. In other cases, however, the saving of $5 on 
a service fee plays a too-important part. An effort 
to save $5 on a service fee often means a loss of 
$100 or more when the colt is two years old. The 
day of the mediocre horse is over, and the farmer 
is only wasting time and effort by bringing the scrub 
into the world. No one wants him, there is no place 
for him and he will not bring his cost at four years 
old. However, the best of every breed are growing 
in demand and price. If farmers generally would pay 
more attention to selecting animals of the right kind 
of breeding, progress would be made more rapidly. 
It should be remembered that good feet and legs 
are the first essential of a marketable horse. If a 
stallion does not have them he cannot be expected 
to produce them in his progeny. 

❖ * ❖ 

G. T. Florida & Son, of Sweetwater, Tenn., who is 
the King of Tennessee jack men, advises the Breeder 
and Sportsman of the sale of his three-year-old cham- 
pion jack to Jenkins & Shook, of Tarboro, N. C, for 
$1,200. Mr. Florida breeds the best jacks in that 
section of the South and has made some remarkable 
sales. He recently sold 18 head to R. A. N. Walker, 
of Jonesboro, Tenn., for $27,000, at private sale. 
^ ^ <S> 

Hughes Maupin, the well known North Callaway 
operator, last week bought 11 mules and a horse from 
O. E. Underwood, of Wellsville. 




Holstein Interest Improved by Sensational Purchase. 

While the dairy interest of the Pacific Coast has 
been making phenomenal strides for several years, 
and many famous herds of dairy cattle brought into 
this section, which have proven profitable, the pur- 
chase at the recent Pacific International Livestock 
Show, at Portland, of the junior yearling bull, Fin- 
derne Mutual Fajne Valdessa, by Mr. John von Her- 
berg, well known theatrical man and ranchman of 
Portland and Seattle, for $21,500, is the most valu- 
able acquisition to the interest yet attained. The 
consignor of this magnificent young bull was Bern- 
hard Meyer, of Findeme, N. J., who is one of the 
foremost breeders of America. 

Finderne Mutual Fayne Valdessa is considered the 
greatest Holstein of all time and in addition to his 
wonderful type and Holstein character, carries the 
blood of more champions than any bull in this coun- 
try. He is sired by a son of the first 40-pound cow 
of the breed and his grandsire was champion Pontiac 
Cornucopia that sold for $15,000 several years ago, 
and which was the record price for many years. His 
dam, Finderne Mutual Fayne, was the world's record 
junior two-year-old. 

Mr. von Herberg owns one of the most magnificent 
country places in the country near Kent, Wash., 
where Valdessa will head the heard of 100 magnifi- 
cently bred Holsteins. 

Ayrshire Breeders' Association Annual IVIeeting. 

The forty-second annual meeting of the Ayrshire 
Breeders' Association was held at Hotel McAlpin, 
New York, January 11th, with about one hundred and 
twenty-five members and friends present. The re- 
port of the secretary showed an increase in the 
number of members over any year since the organi- 
zation of the association, one hundred and eight new 
members having been added, coming from all parts 
of the United States and Canada, but particularly 
from the West and Southwest, the result largely of 
the increased advertising done by the association 
during the year. 



The Hillcrest Stock Farm, near Davis, California, 
has long maintained the reputation of being one of 
the prominent factors in the growth of better stock 
in California. It is one of the pioneer establishments 
of the West which has stood always for the advance- 
ment of pure-bred stock and only the best available 
blood has ever been considered when it came to 
purchasing new foundation stock. Perhaps one of 
the most important secrets of the success of T. S. 
(ilide, the owner, has been in the constant improve- 
ment of his herd. Never satisfied with letting well 
enough alone, Mr. Glide has gone out and year after 
year added some famously bred bull or cow to be 
used in the foundation. 

The famous King Edward has, however, added 
much to the success of this magnificent herd, and the 
blood of that grandly bred bull can now be found in 
many of the leading herds in the state. He was 
three times grand champion at the state fair and his 
offspring has repeatedly won in important shows over 
the state. His most noted son. King Lancaster, now 
one of the herd bulls at Hillcrest, is proving a re- 
markable sire, as are also Hillcrest Knight and 
Knights' Perfection. Mr. Glide has much faith in two 
recent purchases, one a Canadian bred bull and the 
other a calf of Cumberland blood. 

There are more than 70 head in his stables at the 
present time being fitted for forthcoming sales and 
shows. While the Shorthorn herd at Hillcrest has 
been the leading breed, they also have several mag- 
nificent flocks of pure bred sheep. They market 
thousands of sheep and cattle annually, and the big 
prices their market stock commands is on account of 
the uniformity of type and quality found in their 
beef herds, which are from pure bred bulls and very 
high grade cows. 

<S> ^ <$> 

There are 80 cows in the magnificent herd of 
Holstein-Friesians owned by A. W. Morris & Sons, 
of Woodland, Cal., including 28 heifers, which aver- 
age 16,932 pounds of milk and 722.29 pounds of 
butter in one year. 



California swine breeders seem to appreciate the 
merits of the Berkshire, and that profitable breed can 
be found in great numbers on the good ranches of 
the state. There are also a number of splendid 
herds of pure bred Berkshires in this state which 
are far in advance of any in the Combelt. 

<» ♦ ♦ 

All previous Colusa county wool sales were broken 
last week when F. J. Mendonsa sold 60,000 pounds 
at 33 cents per pound. This is ten cents in advance 
of any price heretofore received by this well known 
sheepman. The wool sold by Mr. Mendonsa is con- 
tracted for May delivery. He refused to sell his 
lambs for June delivery at $6.50 per head. This is 
indicative of what he expects sheep prices to come to 
during the coming season. 

❖ ❖ 

J. M. Roberts, California field agent for the Amer- 
ican Jersey Cattle Club, with headquarters in Davis, 
has returned from an extended business visit through 
Missouri and Kansas, where he purchased 21 head 
of Jersey cattle. The selections were made from the 
leading herds of those states and are from some of 
the largest producing herds in the country. Mr. 
Roberts personally accompanied the shipment from 
Kansas City. 

❖ <S> 

I. F. Davis, agent of Animal Husbandry of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, who is looking after 
pig club work in California, has recently organized 
clubs in many public schools in the state. Last week 
he organized a club at Live Oak which promises to 
accomplish much. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

E. O. Lamb, a leading sheepman of Paisley, Ore- 
gon, has sold his wool, numbering 2,800 fleeces, to 
Chas. Umbi'ch, a Lake View dealer, for more than 
30 cents per pound. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

The wool, cattle and horse market around Lake 
View, Oregon, has been rather active during the last 
week. The majority of the cattle and horses were 
sold to California buyers. Jas. Dodson, a prominent 
shipper, brought 300 head of good cattle to California. 
One hundred head were purchased from M. C. Cur- 
rier, 128 from W. B. Parker, 62 from C. E. Campbell 
and others from various breeders. He also made 
purchases from Brattain Bros., and Elder & Mc- 
Donald, of Paiseley, Ore. Six hundred head were 
purchased in that community. Mr. Horton intends 
to buy 1,000 head for shipment to California. 
<S> <S> <S> 

The value of the combined products of the farms 
of Missouri in 1916 was approximately $232,000,000, 
according to the state board of agriculture. 

^ <$> ^ 

D. O. Lively, San Francisco's well known live stock 
broker, is attending the National Western Live Stock 
and Horse Show at Denver, Colorado, this week. Be- 
fore his return to the coast Mr. Lively will attend 
several important live stock sales in Illinois, Iowa 
and Missouri. 

Wilmer L. McElroy, of near Louisiana, recently 
purchased at Palmyra, Mo., a two-year-old Percheron 
stallion that is a half-brother to the great two-time 
International Grand Champion, The Dragon. This 
youngster is said to be one of the best of his age. 
Mr. McElroy also reports the sale of a pure bred 
Percheron mare to C. H. Randall, of Whitmore, Kan- 
sas. In an interview recently, Mr. McElroy expressed 
himself as feeling most optimistic regarding the im- 
mediate future of the live stock industry. Particu- 
larly does Mr. McElroy view with favor the situation 
as it applies to the breeding of draft horses, jacks 
and mules. "Europe will never again be looked upon 
as the nursery of the draft horse and American 
breeders will henceforth lead in their production," 
was his comment on the subject. 

❖ ❖ 

J. T. Johnson just put on feed what is said to be 
one of the finest bunches of cattle ever brought to 
the county. They are equally Whitefaces, Blacks and 
Shorthorns. They were sent to Mr. Johnson's Fish 
Branch and Laddonia farms. 



Saturday, January 27, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



1 



The University Farm 



By JUMP CAUTHORN. 



The farm, no matter how far off the beaten track 
of civilization; how old-fashioned are the ideas of 
the owner or how run down the improvements may 
be, to all good blueblooded people, is more alluring 
than are the great white ways of our best cities, with 
all their thrillers, romance and glamour. It does 
one good and is of far more value, however, to visit 
one of the country places of the new-idea farmer and 
stock grower. 

Only a visit to one of these modern ranches will 
give one any conception of what progress is being 
made in an agricultural way, and every man who pro- 
poses the establishment of a herd of pure bred stock 
or to go into extensive agriculture, should visit the 
leading establishments of the vicinity in which he 
expects to operate, before going on with his venture. 
However much one learns on these inspections, it 
is only the pi-eliminary to what he will get by visit- 
ing the University Farm, at Davis. 

Having only left the corn belt, with its long estab- 
lished agricultural colleges and advanced herds of 
breeding stock, I fully expected to spend most of my 
time, when I visited Davis, in advising those with 
whom I came in contact, of the achievements being 
made there: of the results of their experiments and 
of the value of those institutions to the interest of 
which they are devoted; of the great land of plenty, 
where the farmer's son is born with the silver spoon 
in his mouth; where "milk and honey land" first got 
its name. However, there was not a chance for me 
to bring up a subject or to make a statement, that 
the instructors at Davis did not show me one better, 
and I was amazed to see an institution so young, and 
only since the achievements of their efforts made at 
the International Stock Show known to the Cornbelt 
and East, achieving so much. 

Th6re are no agricultural and experimental sta- 
tions in the United States today that are more inter- 
esting than the University Farm, with its varied 
lines of endeavor and instruction, its experiments 
and live stock, and growing crops. The farm con- 
sists of 780 acres in the fertile Sacramento valley, 
where facilities for agricultural investigation are un- 
equaled. It was established about ten years ago and 
at present has an enrollment of several hundred stu- 
dents; more than 150 head of pure bred cattle of all 
leading breeds, and the same number of pure bred 
sheep in which the following breeds are represented: 
Hampshire, Shropshire, Southdown, Cotswold and 
Romney Marsh. The advancement of California as 
a sheep state in recent years has attracted the at- 
tention of live stock breeders everywhere, and the 
state farm is responsible in a large measure for this 
progress and prevailing activity among the breeders 
of the state. 

More than 400 hogs are handled every year, and in 
no department has the school proven more valuable 
to students and breeders. The most successful ex- 
periments have been carried on, and California, a 
few years ago not mentioned when prominent swine 
breeders met, is now regarded as one of the leading 
swine states. The popular breeds are handled and 
they have owned some of the most noted boars and 
brood sows in the counti"y. The farm is now furnish- 
ing breeders all over California with foundation 
stock. 

The certainty that good draft horses will always be 
in demand and profitable for the breeder, has caused 
the school to establish a splendid band of pure bred 
draft horses. Practicing what they preach, they pro- 
cured a splendid foundation, and the Percheron stal- 
lion, Fernand, with several filly foals, is the begin- 
ning of what is expected to b*^ one of the leading 
draft horse breeding establishments in the country. 



Percheron stallion 
Fernand and five of 
his get. 




The young mares sired by Fernand and owned at the 
farm show that he is a sire of splendid type, with 
necessary size, bone and conformation. One of the 
mort attractive horses, however, on the farm is the 
twoyear-old Shire mare, by Newadd Hillside, the 
Jack London stallion. This Ally won her class at the 
P.-P. I. E. and I believe could win in any company 
today, were it not for a slight blemish. She is 
breaking nicely and is doing her share of the work 
on the farm. The evident interest shown by the stu- 
dents in these horses is splendid assurance that there 
are to be a lot of valuable herds established in Cali- 
lornia in the future. 

E\ery California farmer, rancher and stock grower 
should arrange to visit this wonderful institution, 
which is doing much to make this the leading agri- 
cultural state. The rapidity with which the science 
of agriculture has developed and the many ways in 
whicli ranch profits may be increased or losses re- 
duced, make it very necessary that every present day 
ranchers visit the farm. The farmers' short courses 
f.re no\V being well attended, and many successful 
riinchcr-stockmen have found that a few weeks' in- 
struction at the University Farm have been the most 
profilable teed they have ever sown. The value of 
the short course is best attested by the steadily in- 
creasing enrollment. 

The student is taught both by lectui'es and prac- 
tical work. He. is required to do the things which 
will make him more expert in his stock raising and 
agricultural endeavors. 

Some have told me the fertility of the farm has 
been the cause of California's agricultural college 
making such remarkable progress; others, however, 
declare they could do more on their own farms if 
they had the money to operate on; while others be- 
lieve it's just because it's California. I should say, 
however, from what I have seen of conditions and 
the advancement of this great institution, that the 
faculty and instructors of the College of Agriculture 
are responsible for more of its success than all these 
splendid affiliations. California has been fortunate 
in selecting men of the type found in this school. 
They have excluded politics and prejudice entirely; 
have gone to the four corners of the earth to get the 
best limber for every department. The instructors 
work to one end, every one desirous of having his 
department outdo the other, and the result is won- 
derful. The whole school is a fascinating, co-opera- 
tive organization with every department dovetailing 
into the others. 

o 

MISSOURI NOTES. 



[By RUFUS JACKSON.] 
In a communication to this paper J. F. Morrow, of 
Adairville, Ky., asks to be put in touch with a 
responsible mule-feeder as he desires to buy a car- 
load of mare mules of good quality, two- to four- 
year-olds, preferably twos and threes. Any reader 
that can supply Mr. Morrow's wants will confer a 
favor by writing him and mentioning the Breeder 




Grade shire, mare 
and foal. Both bred 
at the University 
Farm. The filly was 
first in her class 
at the Sacramento 
State Fair. 



and Sportsman. 

Last week's sales just about cleaned up the Mis- 
souri cotton mules of Audrain, Callaway and Boone 
counties. A prominent mule-feeder informs us that 
there remain in the feed lots of the three counties 
not to exceed 2u0 head of cotton mules. This num- 
ber includes a load belonging to John (Jlenn, of east 
of Columbia, two loads belonging to Henry Brown of 
Hallsville, and one load belonging to Sam Brown 
of t;entralia. Never before in the memory of pres- 
ent day mule-feeders has there been so active a 
demand or better prices obtainable for well condi- 
tioned cotton mules. 

R. B. Glenn, of near Stephens, cleaned up his mule 
pens last week with two shipments to the National 
market. The first load sold Thursday at $207.50 and 
the other load sold Saturday at $200. 

Zena W. Green, of the well known firm of W. L. 
Green & Sons, of t.'entralia, was on the National Sat- 
urday with a load of cotton mules that .sold at satis- 
factory prices. The last year has been the most suc- 
cessful in the career of W. L. Green & Sons. The 
firm has handled 3,387 head of mules, of which all 
but 484 head were sold as "warriors" to the foreign 
governments. Wliile December was the banner month 
for the finn yet the largest individual sale was made 
in July, when the firm sold to Hudson & Sons of 
New Orleans, 154 head for over $30,000. The sales 
by months follow: January, 270; February, 33; 
March, 20; April, 98; May, 111; June, 232; July, 247; 
August, 321; September, 377; October, 512; Novem- 
ber, 339; December, 827. However, this does not 
include about 1,200 head of mules purchased by 
Charles W. Green, of the firm, and shipped to market 
from other points. 

Owen Layson, of near Hereford, last week sold 27 
head of cotton mules to J. Ed Moore, representing 
the Maxwell-Crouch Mule Co., of the National mar- 
ket, at $227. r,0 a head. These n;ules were shipped 
from McCredie Saturday. 

Stockmen throughout this section of the State are 
commenting upon the absence of Howard Bailey of 
the Maxwell-Crouch Co. Mr. Bailey in previous sea- 
sons has been represented in the extensive pur- 
chases made in this territory, and the activities at 
the National market have heretofore been forecasted 
by the visits of the popular dealer to the mule pens 
of this section. It may be explained that Mr. Bailey 
is yet in the mule business but is on the selling 
rather than the buying end. His firm has had exten- 
sive contracts with the Allied Governments and for 
the last year has been located in New York, where 
he receives the mules shipped from his firm for ex- 
port and collects for same from the fiscal agents of 
the governments purchasing the mules. In this con- 
nection it is of interest to know that all the mules 
now being sold by Mr. Bailey's firm to the Allies are 
being shipped to New York and other eastern sea- 
ports by express. The additional cost, it is said, is 
overcome by the lessened loss by death and injuries 
suffered through the slower means of freight trans- 
portation. J. Ed Moore, of Callaway county, has I'ep- 
resented the Maxwell-Crouch concern in this terri- 
tory in Mr. Bailey's absence and his purchases have 
been in keeping with his high-class judgment of 
mules and their values. 

There is a good story being told at the expense of 
Col. Harry Gillen, of the Gillen-Heiman Mule Co., 
of the National market. The story goes that Col. 
Gillen, in anticipation of the visit of one of the firm's 
good buyers, came up to Mexico in advance of the 
patron's arrival at the market. With his character- 
istic promptness for details, Col. Gillen ordered three 
cars set out at McCredie to be loaded for that after- 
noon's north-bound train and departed for that point 
on the morning passenger. Upon his arrival there 
he immediately proceeded to Tyke Harrison's mule 
pens and almost before he had looked over the Har- 
rison & Yates mules he had negotiated their pur- 
chase. Upon his return to McCredie a telegram was 
handed him. This read in effect that the firm's 
expected buyer had arrived at the National and that 
he had stated flnnly that he expected to acquire the 
mules needed by him at a price not to exceed $200 
a head. One may imagine the Colonel's state of 
mind when it is staled that the mules that he had 
bought and arranged to ship so hurriedly for this 
particular patron had cost th(! munificent sum of 
$225 around. 



J. B. Rutter, of east of Mexico, recently purchased 
a mare mule from R. A. and J. R. Fountain, of Cen- 
tralla, for $240. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, January 27, 1917 



Warranted 

to give satisfaction. 




GOMBAULT'S 

CAUSTIC BALSAM 

A safe, speedy and 
positive cure for 

Onfb, Splint, Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind Puffs, 
and all lameness from Spsrin, Ringbone 
and other bony tumsrs. Cures all skin 
diseases or ParajltM, Thrush, Diphtheria. 
Removes aU Bunobes from Borses or 
CAttle. 

matUlB, BpnUna, man Throat, eM., It 
U invaiakble. 



Erarr 60«1« of Ci( 
Warraaud to give ni 
par bottla. Sold by i 
preaa, oDJaiea paid. ^ 
nae. Sana fer aesorl 
nlalB, ato. Aildrcii 



fUc ViUaam sold la 
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. or aant by ax- 
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m UTUMCI-VILUill UMPin, OltTiUsd, Ohi« 



Point-Au-View 

FARM 

MAYSVILLE, KENTUCKY 

HIGHEST CLASS THREE 
AND FIVE-GAITED SADDLE HORSES 

for tlie 

PLEASURE and SHOW RING 

LANQHORNE TABB ANDERSON 

Proprietor 

..Modern Horse Management.. 

By 

CAPTAIN R. S. TIMMIS 



Nearly 500 photographs and drawings. 
144 Plates 11x8. Royal quarto, 316 
pages. Cassell & Co.: London, To- 
ronto, Melbourne, etc. Stokes & Co.: 
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"A most valuable authority." — Sporting 
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For sale by 

BREEDER A. SPORTSMAN, 
O. Drawer 447, San Franclac* 




Convenience- 
Train Schedules 
Fast Service 
Clean comfortable ridin; 
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Courteous employes 
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Modern steel coaches. 

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tSK TOUR DEALER SEND 6c IN STiMPS FOR TRIAL CAN 

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Dogs and pups of all breeds for sale. 
Dogs boarded under sanitary condi- 
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and puppies. Dogs clipped and baths 
carefully given. Positively no sick 
dogs accepted. 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

Proprietor. 

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DEALERS PAPER 

S7-1rt St., San Franolaee, Cal. 
niaka, McFall * Co., Portland. Or*. 
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-EL DORADO- 



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If Your Dealer Doesn't Curry It, Address 

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C. LINDAUER ir^^ln^Vc'o.'c.^ 
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COUNTRY HORSES FOR SALE 

WEICillING 1200 Lbs. TO 1700 Lbs. 

IMul*s In Carload Lots 

Horiet ind Rl|i of All Deicrlpllont for Hire >l All TImii 



IF YOU HAVE A HORSE TO SELL THIS SPRING 

The 50th regular and annual 
early Spring Sale of the 

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at the 

UNION STOCK YARDS, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 

MARCH 26, 27, 28 and 29, 1917 

offers the best and surest way to secure the 
highest price with the least trouble, risk and 
expense. 

Consignments already secured from Cali- 
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and wish to save the expense and time of 
making the trip in person. 

Let us hear from you with particulars 
at once and we will give you all details by 
return mail. 

Address : 

Chicago Horse Sale Co., 

UNION STOCK YARDS, CHICAGO, ILL. 



GOOSE SflOOTING!! 



-ON- 



CHURCH-HANSON 

Famous Goose Preserve 

Near Rio Vista 



THE BEST GOOSE CALLERS IN THE 
STATE 
and a large number of 
LIVE GEESE DECOYS ALWAYS 
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THE SPORTSMAN A GOOD SHOOT. 

FOR PARTICULARS and RESERVATION PHONE OR WRITE: 



W. Gordon Wagner 

PROPRIETOR 

HOTEL RIO VISTA 
Rio VIsta — California 




HOf?SE 
EALTH 



I 



The right remedy lor }^AricAtJ^ 
bnililing up liorses run -At- ■•^^•■^j^ 
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TWO c j» 



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I 

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Classified Advertising 



WANTED. 
Position as trainer by a thoroughly 
competent man of good habits. Has 
trained and raced horses on the eastern 
circuit and in California. Can furnish 
high-class recommendations and refer- 
ences. Address TRAINER, Box 212, 
Pleasanton, Cal. 

FOR SALE 
BELGIAN STALLION, registered, 
weighs 1950, 8 years old. A high class 
horse in every respect; sound and hand- 
some. Sires high-clasa colts. Will sell 
cheap for quick sale, -j 
Address 

A. L. WATSON, 
Patterson, Stanislaus Co., Cal. 

LIVE STOCK INSURANCE: Registered 
live stock and farm work horses should 
be insured. The Hartford Company, 
strongest in the world writing live stock. 
No trouble to answer questions. D. O. 
Lively, special representative, 216 Ho- 
bart BIdg., San Francisco. 
AT LAST THE PERFECT SILO— THE 
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experiments. Any one can erect. Close 
price. Address D. O. Lively, 215 Hobart 
Bldg., San Francisco. 

THOIIOUOHSRKD STALLION rOR SALB 

Brown, six y«Brs old. sired by Orsini, dam 
Leta Trix by ISrutus, sound. Bred by J. J. 
Moore. Address JAMES LAYNE, 

26 S. River Street, San Jose, Cal. 



ALL CUTS 
IN THIS PUBLICATION MADE BY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PHOTO -ENGRAVING CO. 

215 LEIDESDORFF ST., | 
San Franclaco, Cal. '| 

Phone Douglas 1810 



Saturday, January 27, 1917] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



15 




$:50,000 stake Winne^r 

Cured by SAVE-The-HORSE 

" (Trade-Mirk, RegiBtereiJ) 



I have bought Save-The-Horse for years. ONE of the most 
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800; and the Hindoo Staee, $10,775. It has always been suc- 
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JOHN I. SMITH, Trainer, Gravesend, L. I. 

SAVE-The-HORSE is guaranteed by signed Contract-Bond to cure SPAVIN, 
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YOUR BEST HORSE MAY BE DEAD TOMORROW 

The "TWO HARTFORDS" 

With Resources exceeding $30,000,000 

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Better Be Safe than Sorry ! 

Address all inquiries to 

ROLAND G. DRAKE, Asst. Gen. Agent, 

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4J8 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 

Mention The Breeder and Sportaman 



READ -.1 

"THE RIGBT TO BE WELL BORN" 

— OR — 

''Horse -Breeding in Its Relation to 
Eugenics'' 

By. W. E. D. STOKES, President 

THE PATCHEN WILKES STOCK FARM, LEXINGTON, KY. 

■ FOR SALE I 

AT ALL AMERICAN NEWS STANDS AND AT ALL BOOK STORES 




MANHATTAN STOCK AND POULTRY 

FOOD AND REMEDIES 

Awarded Gold Medal 
at California State Fair 

ENDORSED BY THE LEADING HORSEMEN 
OF THE UNITED STATES 

Red Ball Stock Food Co., 

OAKLAND CAL. 



To Be Sure You're Shooting a 



mm) 



SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDER 

DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
OR SCHULTZE 

Should Be on Case, Carton 
and the Top Shot Wad 

There is prevalent among shooters some con- 
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shotgun powders; DUPONT, BALTJSTITE 
and SCHULTZE are the Smokeless Shotgun 
Powders manufactured by the Du Pont Company 

Look at the Top Shot Wad 

—if it reads DUPONT, BALLISTITE or SCHULTZE 
you have the Du Pont Company's powder in your 
shot shells. 

Ask for DUPONT, BALLISTITE or SCHULTZE at 
your dealer's or club when buying loaded shells. 

For booklets giving loads for trap and game shooting, 
or any information about sporting powders, write to 

£. /. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 

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505 Lankershim BIdg., Los Angeles. 



QTALUON CARDS 



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THE WISE SPORTSMAN'S NEW YEAR RESOLUTION! 

Use the © Brand Shells and Cd^rtridges 

1; Wherever ammunition is used the name of "Peters" is synonymous with QUALITY. The high standards used in the production of these goods guarantee 
that every lot of shells or cartridges shipped under our labels embodies all the essentials of perfect ammunition, such as accuracy, penetration, uniformity 
and general reliability. 

^ In the last analysis, successful performance is the most conclusive evidence of quality, and during the year 1916, the exceptional shooting proficiency of 
Peters shells has again been demonstrated. 

Mr. Rolla O. Helkes. a veteran of more than 25 years' experience in trapshooting, began using Peters shells a little over a year ago and his Official Average 
for 1916, 96.24^0. exceeds by several per cent the best average he ever made with other makes of shells. 

Similarly Mr. W. R. Crosby, another man with country-wide fame among trapshooterc and sportsmen of all classes, averaged In 1916 96.79^i, using 
Peters shells exclusively and exceeding any yearly average he has ever made on a similar or greater number of targets when using other brands of ammu- 
nition. 

Add 10 this the achievement of Mr. Woolfolk Henderson in winning the Official High Amateur Average in 1914, 96.63"i, and in 1915, 97. SS''^, and Second 
Amateur honors In 1916, 97.14%, and you have evidence enough to convince the most skeptical that Peters shells are a real contributor to the making of 
high scores. 

The amateur shooter who heeds the handwriting on the wall and decides to use thefUj brand shells In 1917 is sure to make the best scores of which 

the shooting fraternity our best wishes for the New Year, including "100%" happiness and a "straight 
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BRANCH .... 



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OFFICIAL HIGH AVERAGES FOR 1916 

WON BY USERS OF 
Guns and Ammunition 

Mr. Fred Harlow of Newark, Ohio, broke 1964 out of 2010 Single Targets averaging 97.71 and thereby winning The Interstate Association's Official 
High Amateur Average for 1916 at Singles. 

Mr. Chas. G. Spencer of St. Louis, Mo., broke 54 out of 60 Doubles averaging SO^r, thus making Mr. Spencer the winner of The Interstate Association's 
Official High Professional Average for 1916 at Doubles. 

Mr. F. M. Troeh of Vancouver, Washington, shot at 120 Doubles and broke 105, an average of Vl.^'U, giving Mr. Troeh the Interstate Association's 
Official High Amateur Average at Doubles. 

ALL THREE GENTLEMEN USED WINCHESTER SHOTGUNS AND MR. HARLOW AND 

MR. SPENCER WINCHESTER REPEATER SHELLS 



i 



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Parker Gun Records 

MR. HENRY PFIRRMANN, JR., with his 34-inch double barrel Parker made the 

HIGHEST GENERAL OFFICIAL AMATEUR AVERAGE 
on the Pacific Coast during 1916. He also won the 

CHAMPIONSHIP OF CALIFORNIA 

scoring 100 straight targets, and made the highest General Average at the Ver- 
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made the highest Official Averages in America in 1914 and 1915. 
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For further particulars regarding guns of 8 to 28 gauge, address 

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— or — A. W. du BRAY, Residing Agent, San Francisco, Cal.; P. O. Box 102 



—TRAINING THE HOUND— 

A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE TRAINING OF FOX HOUNDS, BEAQLES, 

AND COON HOUNDS. 

The system of training advocated Is simple and effective, so that anyone who car- 
ries out Instructions can easily develop a foxhound, a beagle or a coon dor to the 
higrhest state of usefulness or organize a pack in which each hound will work Independ- 
ently and at the same time harmoniously with the others. The subjects are: The 
Hound's Ancestry, History. Instinctive Tendencies, English and Native Hounds, Devel- 
oping the Intelligence, Training the Foxhound, "Voices and Pace of the Hound, Quali- 
ties of Scent. Manners. Training the Coon Dog, Coon Hunting, Training the Beagle. 
Forming a Pack, Field Trial Handling. Faults and Vices. Conditioning. Seiectlns and 
Rearing Puppies. Kennels and Yards. Diseases of Hounds and Their Treatment. The 
chapters on field trial training and handling are alone worth the price of the book, 
which is one that every man who loves the voice of a bound should read. 

The book contains 224 pages, is clearly printed, nicely bound, and handsomely Illus- 
trated with bloodhounds, various types of Engllah and American foxhounds, beaclei 
and cross-bred dogs for 'possum and coon hunting. 

Price, In heavy paper cover, $1; $1.50, postpaid. 
ADDRESS: 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

p. O. ORAWKR 447, SAN FRANCISCO, CAU 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1917 



Pleasanton Driving Park 

== — =PLEASANTON. CALIFORNIA 

offers for service for ihe season of 1917 the following stallions: 

THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4 

Fastest trotting stallion ever offered for service in California 
and fifth fastest entire trotter in the world 

Son of Si. Valiant Vincent 2:11% (by St. Vincent 2:13% out of the triple 
producer Grace Lee 2:29 '4 by Electioneer 125); dam Amy Smith by Emperor 
Wilkes 2:20%. sire of Princess Eulalia (4) 2:09»4. etc.; grandam by Hamble- 
tonian 539. 

The Anvil is regarded by Edward F. Geers as one of the very greatest trot- 
ters that he has ever raced. For five years the pair of Tennesseeans went to 
the races together .nnd in that time were but twice unplaced, while winining a 
total of fifteen races, including the historic M. and M. 

As an individual he is most pleasing, not too large or coarse in any way but 
smoothly and compactly made and "all horse" in every line. He is a perfect 
headed, pure gaited trotter, with the very best of disposition, and is destined 
to become a very great sire of trotting speed. His opportunities in the stud 
have been very slight as he has been retired from racing only since the close 
of 1914. He was selected to head the stud at Pleasanton Driving Park not only 
on account of his great qualities as a race trotter, but because one of his first 
foaLs, Anvilite (2) 2:22'/i. with a trial of ten seconds or more faster, w-as in 
e very way the greatest colt trotter e^ er handled by C. L. DeRyder. The services 
of The Anvil are recommended to you without reserve. 

Fee for THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4, $50 with usual privilefe 

Vernon McKinney 2:01 1-2 

Fastest member of the great family of McKinney 2:^^y^ 
Sire of VERNA McKINNEY (2) 2:13 (his first foal raced), fastest two- 
year-old pacing filly of 1015, three-year-old record, 1916, 2:09;4; 
VERNON DIABLO, mat. rec. half mile track 2:1414, and DR. DYER 
(3) trial 2:1214. 

Son of Guy McKinney ,'?7625 (by McKinney 2:11% out of Flossie Drais by Guy 
Wilkes 2:15>,4); dam Maud Vernon by Mount Vernon 2:15%, sire of the dams of 
I.iata J. 2:03, etc.; grandam Mag by General McClellan, sire of the dams of 
Mack Mack 2:08, etc. 

\'ernon McKinney 's racing career was not an extensive one but will long be 
remembered for the excellence of his performances, as his winnings include a 
Chamber of Commerce stake in time very near the record for that event at the 
time, and he is the fastest of all the McKlnneys. 

He is a horse of rare qualities in the way of individual excellence, almost 
ideal in behavior and temperament in harness or out. Since his retirement he 
has been a popular horse in the stud and our claim that he would prove a very 
great sire of pacing speed has been fully substantiated, his first foal to be raced 
being the season cliampion for the age and gait in 1915, a most excellent testi- 
monial to his potency. He is a very sure breeder, his get are uniformly endowed 
with natural speed and the physical and mental requirements of modern race 
horses and find ready sile at most gratifying prices. 

Fee for VERNON McKINNEY 2:01 \1, $50 with usual privilege. 

The be.st «( can taken of 'ii.iros in any manner owners may desire, but no 
re.sponsibility a.ssuined for accidents or escapes. Address for particulars 



GEORGE F. RYAN, Superintendent, 



PLEASANTON, CAL. 



Thoroughbred sire M ARSE ABE 

WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1917 AT 



PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK 
Service Fee $50 



Marse Abe carries the best 
blood of America through his 
sire lines. Yankee was a su- 
perior race horse and sire. Han- U I Yankee 
over was the best horse of his B8 
day, and headed the list of win- < | 
ning sires for years. No refer- 
ence is necessary to Hindoo as 
everyone knows what he was. 
Halo, the dam of Marse Abe, < 
is bred Just right to cross with Jg , jj^j^ 
the sire blood in his pedigree; 
a daughter of St. Blaise, son of 
Hermit, the most fashionable 
sire line in England, and backed 
up on her dam's side by the 
lines of long distance perform- 
ers from which sprung Ten 
Brock and other four-milers. 

Address all communications to 



Hanover.. 



( Hindoo ! lii^'^ 

( Florence 

( Bourbon Belle. \ g?,""*? i^Potla'"! 

- (Himyar I 

(. Correction. .' ( Ilira 



iMannie Qr&y. Jfj"^?",^J 
\ Lizzie (r . 



f Hermit (Newminster 
f St. Blaise . J "ermii ^ Seclusion 



esuvienne 



(Fusee Marsy 

1 \ esuv 

, , ^ ( King Alfonso... I Phaeton 

Ida K ) I Cnpitola 

/ Lerna | -Vsteroid 

I Laura 

GEO. F. RYAN, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 



DILLCARA 57462 



Son of Sidney Dillon 23157 (sire of 9 in 2:10 list) and Guycara by Guy Willces 
2867 (sire of 3 in 2:10 list), will make the season of 1917 at 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK, PLEASANTON, CAL. 

SERVICE FEE $50 TO INSURE 

Dillcara is a full brother to Harold Dillon 39610, the leading sire of New Zealand. 
Last season the get of Harold Dillon won 41 races, totalling over $25,000. 
Address all communications to 

GEO. F. RYAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



Anse! M. Easton 



William Ward 
IMPORTERS AND BREEDERS 
of Priz« Winning 

SHIRE HORSES 



Blackhawk Stock Ranch 

Barns full of top notch two to five year old Stallions 

IMPORTED AND HOME BRED 

With weight, style, and quality, heavy clean bone and the best of breeding to recom- 
mend them. Show horses and prize winners. Great opportunity to secure a top-notch 
stallion. 

BLACKHAWK STOCK RANCH, Burllngame, Cal. 
Pleaie lend for free photographic catalogue. Telephone Burllngame 131 



JOE CAREY $50 

THOROUGHBRED STALLION 

I "l^dta"rds S ''ri-e Charlie ] ^i^.l^.t^^Le-s 

Sire of ^ f Banuockburn.. •( ' iNannie nay , Kannie Butler 

Brighouse U| I ,, „. „, . i St. Blaise 

Orange Blossom u\ I Bettie Blaise. ... Fusee 

Custom House ' Bettie M {f?'ji'"'SI1' 

Azurea O ] , , iFfllfnS' ® 

Mercurium „ ^umj^, j Alarm j Ecl;P^ 

Deckhand q | j (Lexington 

Buckshot [Miss Marion... -1 IHegira 

Bernice, and other ( Kiiber JBucaneer 

Good winners. ( imp. .\stolat. ... ) "■'•""^ \ Mineral 

/ Bellicent j Cremorne 

( Lynette by 
Lord Lyon 

Address all communications to: 

GEO. RYAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 

BREED TO THE COAST'S CHAMPION CAMPAIGNER AND FUTURITY SIRE 




Rec. 2:01 3-4. 
Reg. No. 44977 



Jim Logan 

Sire of Hal Logan 2:09, Maxine (3) 2:15, winner of 

Breeders' Futurity, etc. 
Son of CHARLES DERBY 2:20, brother to Klatawah 
(3) 2:051/2, etc., and sire of TEN in 2:10. 
Dam, EFFIE LOGAN, dam of Jim Logan 2:01%, Sir 
Albert S. 2:03)4, and Dan Logan 2:07%. 

In the stud, season of 1917, at Woodland Race Track. 
FEE: $50, u.sual return privilege, $75 to insure liv- 
ing colt payable at time of service or before removal 
of mares. Call at race track or address 

J. ELMO MONTGOMERY, Davis, Cal. 



Jewel Dare 3025 For Sale 

On account of other business taking my entire time, I am offering for sale the 
Great Show Horse and sire. Jewel Dare 3025, by My Dare, 1st dam Maud Jewel, making 
him a full brother to Gypsy Dare and half-brother to the $10,000 My Major Dare. 

Jewel Tucker, by Jewel Dare 3025. 1st dam Sallie Tucker, Foaled 1915. A constant 
winner in 1915 and 1916 including Kentucky State Fair winning. 

The great brood mare, S.Tllie Tucker 7032, by My Own Kentucky, a proven dam of 
high quality. Two extra good geldings by Sir Bourbon, one and five years old, extra 
fine. These are all high-class horses at low prices for quick sale. Your Inspection 
invited. 

CLARENCE B. SMITH. Shelbyville, Ky. 



THE BEAUTIFUL SADDLE STALLION 

Scottie Moore McDonald 

By Champion Rex McDonMd 833 

MUST SELL 

on account of my failing health 

A tried sire, possessing the most desired blood lines, in 
the prime of his life and is offered at a price that should 
appeal to any one in the market for a stallion. 

HE WILL PAY FOR HIMSELF THE FIRST YEAR 

For prices and further information address 

J. R. HODGE, Laddonia, Missouri 



Keep Your Horse Sound and Well 

Learn to know his ailments and treat them 
yourself. Our free booklet, "Veterinary 
Experience," tells cU^arly how to correctly 
diagnose and cure your horse's sickness with 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR 

IT NEVER FAILS 

Tuttle's Elixir, Tuttle's Hoof Ointment, Tuttle's Condition Powders, 
and other Tuttle Remedies are used by horse owners everywhere. 

Don't risk the value and life of your horse— always have Tuttle's 
Elixir in the stable. 

Buy a bottle of Tuttle's Elixir today. Your dealer has it— if not, 

send us his name and 50 cents and we will send you a large .size 
bciUle prepaid, also a copy of "Veterin.Try Kxperieiice." 

TUTTLE'S ELIXIR CO., 19 BEVERLY STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 




NEW EDITION OF JOHN SPLAN'S BOOK 

"LIFE WITH THE TROTTER" 

PRICE $3.00 POSTPAID 
i li-Ma. BRKBDKR and 8PORTB1CAN. P. O. DiMwar 441, Mm Wt m mttm n , OaL 



Saturday, Februay 3, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coast. 

(Established 18S2.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 

OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 

Cor. of Market and Fourth Sts., San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 East 23rd St.. 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Franclaco P. O. 



Terms — One year, $3; six months, $1.76; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage tl per year additional; Canadian postage 
60c per year additional. 

Money should bo sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT is forming and there 
is every reason to believe that it will be comprised 
of more tracks than for many years past. Secretary 
Jos. Waddell is permitting no grass to grow under 
his feet but is visiting every town where a harness 
meeting is possible and getting data that will enable 
him to arrange a circuit in which the meetings will 
come in consecutive order and be profitable to each 
member as well as to the horsemen. He has now 
visited Pleasanton, Salinas, Hollister, San Jose, Pet- 
aluma, Santa Rosa, Dixon, Woodland and Marysville, 
and feels greatly encouraged over the outlook for a 
meeting at every one of those towns and believes 
each and every one will become a member of the 
circuit and hold meetings in the order named. Ukiah 
and Eureka have not yet been visited but Mr. Wad- 
dell intends making a trip to those towns and bring- 
ing them into membership if possible. In regard to 
the towns that wuU hold fairs and race meetings 
after the State Pair, Mr. Waddell is pretty certain 
that the difference of opinion in regard to dates can 
be amicably arranged so that a continuous circuit 
will be held as far as Bakersfleld. There will be 
no conflict of dates in the circuit from Pleasanton 
to Sacramento and Secretary Waddell is optimistic 
enough to believe that a get-together meeting of the 
representatives of fairs that desire to hold meetings 
after the State Fair will result in harmony and an 
arrangement of dates that will not conflict. There- 
fore the outlook for at least 15 consecutive weeks of 
harness racing is now a most promising one. As 
Mr. Waddell remarked the other day, there are two 
main factors in guaranteeing a race meeting against 
loss — gate receipts and entrance money. He is cer- 
tain from what he has thus far seen of California 
that the gate receipts will be sufficient in any town 
where a good meeting is held, and he knows to an 
absolute certainty that if a circuit of ten or more 
meetings is advertised the entries will be more than 
sufficient to meet that end of the expense. In fact, 
he looks for the largest list of entries ever received 
in California. 

o 

ALTHOUGH the market for draft horses has not 
been good in San Francisco during the past year, 
nothing but the very best bringing a fair price, there 
seems to be a demand in New York and Chicago that 
is hard to supply. At a sale held in New York last 
week the Herald says that not only were the offer- 
ings unusually numerous and attractive for this sea- 
son of the year but the buyers were present in large 
numbers, eager to bid on anything useful that came 
under the hammer. F. S. Francis, of Kewanee, 111., 
obtained the best prices of the year on Monday for 
a car lot of western wagon horses, chunks and 
drafters. Scarcely a horse in this consignment 
brought less than $200. The bulk of them went off 
at prices ranging from $250 to $S00, and one pair of 
big fellows went to ?750, the highest price of the day. 
o 

THE Horse Review's Harness Racing Guide and 
Breeders' Directory for 1916 is at hand and, like all 
its predeces.sors, is the one annual that is of most 
use to trotting and pacing horse owners and breed- 
ers, and to turf writers and compilers of any harness 
turf statistics. It has a complete summary of nearly 
every race trotted or paced in the United States last 
year, and in addition tables of statistics on almost 
every subject In which a horseman is interested. We 



don't see how any breeder can get along without it 
and be happy. Its price is the same as previous 
volumes — $2.50 per copy. 

o 

Volume 32 of Wallace's Year Book is out and 
shows many improvements over the lost volume. It 
has the full summaries of all trotting and pacing per- 
formances of the year 1916 in which any heat was 
trotted in 2:30 or better or paced in 2:25 or better, 
compiled from the official reports of the National and 
American trotting associations and other reliable 
sources. Each meeting reported is numbered, show- 
ing that there were 1162 harness meetings reported 
in the United States last year, and about 12,000 trot- 
ters and pacers were raced. A new feature of the 
book is the Winrace and Eligibility List w'hich has 
been compiled by the National Trotting Association. 
Unfortunately, the American Trotting Association 
has not contributed a similar list of records made 
over its tracks and to obtain them application must 
be made to the latter organization. The book is well 
printed and bound in conformity with the preceding 
31 volumes. The price is $3.25 sent prepaid from 
this office on receipt of cash. 



Death of Daphne IVlcKlnney 

Daphne McKinney, the well known brood mare 
owned by W. E. Detels, was found dead last Sunday 
morning in the infield at Pleasanton Training Track, 
where she was at pasture. She was discovered lying 
down as if asleep, with no marks of a struggle, and 
must have died suddenly. She was a bay mare, 
foaled 1900, sired by McKinney, dam La Muscovita 
by Guy Wilkes, second dam Muscova by Belmont 64, 
third dam by Woodford Mambrino. She was bred by 
Dr. C. Masoero, the well known veterinarian of San 
Francisco, and was sold by him to Frank Nugent, 
Superintendent of the Dutard Farm, who sold her 
to Mr. Detels. Her first foal was the pacer Frank N. 
that is now owned by the Dutard Estate. She was 
then bred to Bon Voyage 2:08 and foaled a colt 
named Bon McKinney, th.at took a record of 2:24V4. 
and is the sire of Bon Courage 2: 08 14 and several 
others in the standard list. Her next foal was by 
Alconda Jay and we believe is still owned by the 
Dutard Estate. Daphne McKinney was sold in 1911 
to Mr. Detels who bred her to Palite 45062, and in 
1912 she foaled another colt, that was named Palado, 
but he never took a record. She was mated in 1912 
with The Proof 2:09>4 and the result was a filly that 
lived but 24 hours. In 1913 she was mated with Gra- 
ham Bellini 2:11% and a filly resulted. This filly 
was named Elloretta D. and last summer she won 
second money in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity at 
Santa Rosa, driven by Fred Chadbourne. While 
Elloretta D. has no record she worked miles around 
2:20 last year as a two-year-old and is entered in 
several of the three-year-old stakes for this year. In 
1914 Mr. Detels bred her to Homer Rutherford's colt 
Geo. N. Patterson that now has a record of 2:121/4, 
but she missed. In 1915 she was mated with Ma- 
homet Watts 2:0Ci/4, foaling a handsome colt last 
spring that has just been broken to harness and is 
a very promising yearling. Mr. Detels does not think 
she was in foal at the time of her death, although 
she was bred to Geo. Hammett (3) 2:15>4 last year. 
Mr. Detels is lucky to have a filly from this mare in 
Elloretta D. and she is the only filly from Daphne 
McKinney that is living. La Moscovita, the dam ot 
Daphne McKinney, is the dam of Bon Guy 2:09^4, 
Triva 2:20i4, Lou Crellin 2:23 and Winnie Bond 
2:27. 

A Letter From Mr. Knight. 

We are in receipt of a letter from Secretary Knight 
of the American Trotting Association, under date of 
January 20th, regarding the no-record rule prior to 
July 4th, which reads as follows: "There seems to 
be an impression among horsemen that the new rules 
vacate the conditions of the old rule 49, as to rec- 
ords made prior to and during the week of which 
July 4, 1916, was a part on tracks of The American 
Trotting Association. This is not the case. Their 
eligibility is not affected by the new rules. 

(Signed) W. H. KNIGHT." 

The rule referred to reads as follows: 

"Only race winners, if they be heat winners ac- 
cording to the system raced, shall obtain a record. 
In races conducted under either the Combination 
Plan or Every-Heat-a-Race system, the horse taking 
the record shall be the heat winner standing best in 
the final summary of the race under the Old Placing 
System. Should two or more horses be tied for first 
place in said sunmiary, each horse so tied shall ac- 
quire a record. 

"In determining the eligibility of horses to com- 
pete in public races, only records that have been or 
may hereafter be made by the winners of races shall 
be considered. Records that have been, or which 
may hereafier be, made in performances against 
time (not for money premiums) or in public races 
by non-winners of races or records that may here- 
after be made on the track of the American Trotting 
Association prior to or during the week of which 
July 4th is a part in each year, shall not be consid- 
ered a bar to eligibility in public races, but shall be 
considered a breeder's record." 



Discussing the Kentucky Derby. 

New York, Jan. 22. — That a real American Derby 
to be run at Belmont Park's spring meeting is one 
of the things needful to the turf is not disputed by 
anyone having the interest of racing at heart. An 
evidence of the interest taken in the first and big- 
gest stake of the year for three-year-olds was had 
at the Waldorf yesterday, when a number of horse- 
men and trainers had gotten together. The main 
topic of conversation was the Ketucky Derby to be 
run at Churchill Downs in May. 

The Kentucky Derby has $15,000 added as a purse 
this year, making it not only the richest three-year 
old stake of the year, but the most important because 
of its early running and the chance to prove which 
of the two-year-olds of the past season has developed 
into a star in his three-year-old fomi. 

Trainer Rowe was the center of attraction during 
the discussion of the Derby, for the reason that he 
was the only one present to have entries for the 
Kentucky classic. He made it known that he will 
have four entered in the rich event. 

"Of course, Joyner hasn't anything to enter in the 
Derby," was the kidding remark of Trainer Rowe. 
"He's just a selling-plate trainer, but that doesn't go 
if Mr. Widener hears it. I am entering four for the 
Derby, and Walter Jennings, who is training the big 
Macomber string down at Charleston, S. C, would be 
worried if he knew what great weather we've been 
having here and how well my youngsters are doing. 

The Derby candidates that Mr. Rowe has to enter 
for the Harry Payne Whitney stable are Tumbler, 
Hwfa, Rickety and Bellringer. The trainer declined 
to say which one of the lot he considered the best. 
When it was suggested that Tumbler might be the 
pick of the pack, he called attention to the fact that 
this youngster has been gelded and might not run 
so well, although he admitted that, on the other 
hand, he might show a big improvement in his three- 
year-old form, as he has been showing well recently. 
In Rickety he has a good one that gave Campfire a 
great race in the Futurity last season, having the 
R. T. Wilson champion headed at one stage of the 
journey. 

.A.t any rate, Mr. Rowe is the first to make public 
announcement of what horses he will enter for the 
big spring event. 

"You can go right along entering the best you've 
got, but you are certain to finish behind one horse, 
and that one will be North Star," was the retort of 
A. J. Joyner to Mr. Rowe's kidding remark about Mr. 
Joyner having no fit candidates for the classic event. 
"If North Star keeps well and starts in the Derby, 
they can start paying off on him when they go to 
the post." 

Mr. Joyner is an enthusiast on the subject of North 
Star and the other horses that have been imported 
from abroad by A. K. Macomber. He does not con- 
tend that the other youngsters purchased abroad are 
going to come to the races as world-beaters, but he 
is firm in his belief that North Star is the greatest 
horse that has been imported for racing purposes. 

The surprising note sounded in the discussion was 
that of Emil Herz, long supposed to be a strong be- 
liever in the potency of the imported racer. The 
opinion advanced by Mr. Herz was that there were 
far more poor ones than horses worth while among 
the recent buys of Americans in England. 

"In another year North Star may be the greatest 
four-year-old in the world, but I can't see him as a 
winner of this year's Derby," was the assertion made 
by Mr. Herz. "In fact, I'll lay 4 to 1 against him to 
show." And right there the owner of Short Grass, 
the imported thoroughbred just retired to the stud, 
made a "winter book," and found takers of his odds. 
He laid 4 to 1 that North Star would not finish one- 
two-three, but he was backing his contention that 
the newest of Mr. Macomber's imported prizes would 
not even be a starter. 

Mr. Herz is strongly of the opinion that Cudgel, 
one of the Whitney cast-offs of last season, purchased 
by John W. Schorr, would be heard from in the 
Derby. 

o 

To bring the horse back to his old-time glory the 
State Racing Commission will recommend to the 
New York Legislature, in its annual report, the adop- 
tion in the state of the pari-mutuel system of betting. 
The introduction ot bills to carry out this recom- 
mendation, it is expected, will again cause one of 
the bitterest fights ever known in the Legislature, 
and open again the race track betting controversy, 
which under Governor Hughes resulted in laws pro- 
hibiting all betting on New York race tracks. Before 
any pari-mutuel system could be established in New 
York there would have to be an amendment to the 
present Constitution of the State, adopted in 1894, 
which, in Section 9 of Article 1 says, in part: "Nor 
shall any lottery or the sale of lottery tickets, pool- 
selling, bookmaking, or any other kind of gambling 
hereafter bo authorized or allowed within this State, 
and the Legislature shall pass appropriate laws to 
prevent offenses against any of the provisions of 
this section." 

* * * 

The Futurity for 1919 has received the largest en- 
try list in ten years, no less than 919 nominations 
having been received. It is believed the value of 
the stake when run will be over $65,000. 

* * * 

The King of Spain, who races under the nom de 
plume of the Duke ot Toledo, has entered a number 
of horses for the coming English flat racing season. 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1917 



Harness Horses and Horsemen 



Death of William F. Whittier. 

William F. Whittier, one of California's leading 
business men and land owners, proprietor of the 
largest and most perfectly appointed trotting horse 
breeding farm in this State, died at his home in San 
Francisco on Friday of last week after a brief illness, 
aged 86 years. 

Mr. Whittier was a pioneer and one of the few 
remaining members of the famous Vigilance Commit- 
tee of 1856. He was born in Maine January 17th, 
1832, came to California in 1854, entering the paint 
and oil business in 1857 by forming the Cameron- 
Whittier Company. This firm was succeeded by 
Whtitier, Fuller & Co., in 1867. William P. Fuller 
Sr. died in 1892, and the Whittier, Fuller Company 
dissolved in 1894, after which Mr. Whittier formed 
the Whittier-Coburn Company. He successfully man- 
ufactured the first white lead and the first mirrors 
produced on the Pacific coast. 

In company with his friend, the late Col. E. L. 
Mayberry, Mr. Whittier in 1887 went on a quail hunt 
in the Ht-met Valley, Riverside county. The two 
friends .«aw the possibilities of an irrigation system 
that would bring water to that valley and organized 
a company that built the Hemet dam and made of 
the valley one of the most prosperous fruit growing 
sections of the State. He founded the town of Hemet 
and about fifteen years ago Mr. Whittier took over 
all the holdings of his associates in that section. At 
the time of his death he w;is the sole owner of Lake 
Hemet Water Company and its subsidiaries, Hotel 
Hemet, the Hemet Stock Farm, the First National 
Bank and the Bank of Hemet. He also owned a 
large amount of real estate in Hemet and the sur- 
rounding coimtry. 

Most of the Breeder and Sportsmen's readers are 
more or less familiar with Mr. Whittier's history as 
a breeder of trotting stock. He was always a lover 
of horses but it was not until the death of his friend 
and partner Col. Mayberry that he became an exten- 
sive horse breeder. At the Colonel's death Mr. Whit- 
tier took over some of that gentleman's horses, 
among them the stallion Geo. W. McKinney 2:14'^. 
He had in his employ at the time that thorough 
horseman, the late John R. Holloway, and placed him 
in charge of the new venture. Mr. Holloway attend- 
ed several trotting horse sales during 1908 and 1909, 
buying carefully and selecting some highly bred 
mares. Among others he secured at the dispersal 
of the late Martin Carter's Nutwood Stock Farm, the 
young mare Louise Carter (3) 2:24, in foal to Budd 
Doble's great stallion Kinney Lou 2:07%. After 
being taken to Hemet, Louise Carter gave birth to a 
chestnut colt that was trained by Mr. Holloway the 
next year as a yearling, and driven by him at the 
Phoenix Fair a mile in 2:19V^, the world's record for 
a yearling colt at that time. Hemet Stock Farm im- 
mediately jumped into the limelight as the home of 
a world's champion, and since then it has been vis- 
ited by hundreds of horsemen who have, without ex- 
ception, pronounced it the model stock farm of the 
West. 

When Wilbur Lou was a two-year-old, Mr. Holloway 
began training him again for his stake engagements, 
but scon had to give up personal attention to the 
matter owing to severe illness. He took Wilbur Lou 
and a few others of the Hemet Stock Farm horses 
to San Jose, however, intending to race them on the 
circuit, but his illness suddenly tenninated fatally 
and the horses were put in charge of Budd Doble, 
who then resided at San Jose . Under Mr. Doble's 
driving Wilbur Lou won all his stake engage- 
ments that year and as a three-year-old trotted to a 
record of 2:10Vi. Mr. Whittier then organized the 
Hemet Stock Farm as a corporation with himself 
as President and Mr. Doble as Vice-President and 
Manager. Last year Mr. Doble retired, and Fred 
Ward was engaged as trainer and manager. 

During the racing season of 1916 another world's 
record came to Hemet Stock Farm when Hemet 
Queen, a daughter of Wilbur Lou, paced a mile in 
2:16V4 at Phoenix, which is the fastest mile ever 
paced by a yearling filly. At the same meeting Edith 
Carter, a yearling filly trotter, took a record of 
2:18^/4, which is within a half second of the world's 
record for her age and sex. This filly is out of the 
dam of Wilbur Lou and is by Kinney de Lopez, the 
stallion owned by Budd Doble. 

Hemet Stock Farm is one of the show places of 
California and is as well appointed as any breeding 
farm west of the ISIississippi. It is always kept in 
perfect order and its neat buildings, clover fields, 
half mile tract, etc., are a delight to the eye of every 
horseman who visits Hemet. 

Mr. Whittier made of this farm a success the same 
as he did of every other business in which he en- 
gaged, but his death will probably mean its dispersal, 
which will be a great loss to the horse breeding 
interests of California. 

In the death of Mr. Whittier California has lost 
one of the actual builders of her commonwealth, and 
an energetic man of strict integrity and strong char- 
acter, whose work has always been for the upbuild- 
ing of the State of his adoption. He married Char- 
lotte A .Robinson in Maine in 1858. She died in 



ISS.',. He leaves three children, Mrs. Jane W. Sypher, 
Mtl:. Mattie W. Weir and William R. A\'hittier. Up 
to the time he contracted pneumonia, a few days 
before his death, Mr. Whittier was a very active man 
both mentally and physically, personally directed all 
his extensive business affairs and did not look to be 
witliin twenty years of his age. 

District Fairs Would Aid State Fair. 

Denying insinuations made by some Northern Cali- 
fornia legislators that his bill, which provides that 
the state be split into fifteen districts where district 
fairs could be held, is a measure designed to cripple, 
if not bring about the eventual abolition of the State 
Fair, Senator Herbert W. Slater of Santa Rosa de- 
clares the passage of his bill would insure a bigger 
and more representative State Fair than ever. 

Senator Slater states that primarily his bill is de- 
signed to encourage district fairs, which could be 
participated in by counties far removed from Sacra- 
mento. Secondly, the bill intends to make the State 
Fair a much larger institution than it is now, says 
Slater. 

Slater believes that some provision should be made 
to allow counties to group together, as provided for 
in his bill, and hold fairs of their own. He argues 
that too little attention is being paid to bettering 
the quality and quantity of crops and that the breed- 
ing of stock is leceiving too little attention. Carry- 
ing the argument further, he says these district fairs 
would create a pride in local products in all sec- 
tions of the state. 

"It is a certainty that no fruits, vegetables, mate- 
rials or stock would be exhibited at these fairs that 
would not be the very best," said Senator Slater. 
"When people compete to exhibit the best they nat- 
urally improve the grade of their product." 

Slater states that the advantages of the State Fair 
are now enjoyed only by the people residing in the 
Sacramento valley and nearby foothill counties. He 
believes that the prize winners at the district fairs 
would naturally want to display their wares at the 
State Fair. As a result he thinks that a score or 
more of counties never having exhibits at the State 
Fair would enter the open competitive field the fair 
offers. If these exhibitors were interested enough 
to place their wares before the public at the State 
Fair, they would be interested enough to attend the 
fair themselves. 

"Two years ago a big Sonoma county fair was held 
at Santa Rosa. Jack London and other breeders of 
good stock in Sonoma county entered their stock in 
our fair. After winning prizes there it was but nat- 
ural they would want to invade a wider field. Many 
of them, London among them, brought their prize 
winning animals to the last State Fair. 

"They won prizes at the State Fair, I may add. It 
is a well known fact that the cattle shown at the 
last State Fair were the best in history. If one fair 
would result in procuring a number of exhibitors for 
the State Fair, what would fifteen district fairs do 
for the big yearly exposition? The smaller fairs 
would simply be feeders for the big one. 

"I can't see how there can be any opposition to 
the bill. I know that similar measures have been de- 
feated when brought up in the legislature before, 
but I am very sanguine of the success of this bill, 
because I know it will do no hann and more good 
than can be estimated." 

Slater has also introduced a bill providing for the 
holding of an annual poultry show in some city of 
the State. He claims the annual poultry show would 
be another big feeder of the State Fair, and would 
result in renewed interest in poultry raising in this 
State. 

Lesta J.'s Sire Has New Owner. 

A. T. Jackson, who now resides at Stockton, has 
become the owner by purchase of the stallion Royal 
McKinney 2:29%, sire of Leata J. 2:03, and will 
stand him for public service in San Joaquin county. 
This horse has a very remarkable record as a sire 
as he never stood for public service until 1913, and 
up to this time has but a half dozen foals old enough 
to have been trained. Besides being the sire of 
Leata J. 2:03, winner of $23,000 in purses and stakes, 
he is the sire of The Orphan, that had harness on 
for the first time March 9th, 1916, and was second 
both hests of the two-year-old pace at Sacramento in 
September in 2:17% and 2:18%, and that paced a 
trial mile the following month in 2:14Vi ^vith a halt 
in 1:04. Lloyd A., a full brother to The Orphan, 
trotted a mile in 2:11% as a five-year-old, and 
Blanche, another of his get, paced to a matinee rec- 
ord of 2:14 and trialed in 2:12, while Laura J. at 22 
months old trotted a quarter in 35 seconds and a 
mile in 2:36. Another of Royal McKinney's get 
is used as a work horse and never trained, and these 
are the only ones that Mr. Jackson knows of that 
were sired by Royal McKinney that were broken to 
harness up to last year. 

American Horse Breeders Stakes Fill Well. 

According to official reports from Secretary De- 
vereux's office, a total of fifty-one stallions, including 
all the noted speed producing sires and young pros- 
pects for same distinction, are named in the Cham- 
pion Stallion Stake for foals of 1916 to be raced in 
1919. This is six more than last year, which in turn 
was the largest since the Futurity was first an- 
nounced. Without giving the names of all the stal- 
lions named in this stake, the record shows that no 
less than sixteen of the leading sires of 1916 are in 



the list, the notable absentees being J. Malcolm 
Forbes and Guy Axworthy, the former so far noted 
through the early speed of his get over the tincup 
route, mostly named because of the plan already 
made for his sale, but who will be in the list this 
year as all the five stallions of Walnut Hall Farm 
already are. 

The showing in the Matron Stake is more brilliant 
and indicates that prominent breeding farms, like 
Walnut Hall, Patchen Wilkes ,Hamburg Place, Cold- 
stream, L. E. Brown, Curies Neck, Castleton Farm, 
Midway Farm ,and others, are well represented. The 
official list shows a total of 750 in this branch of the 
Breeders' Futurity, with a total of 124 individual 
nominators of mares, or an average of six for each, 
and of whom just forty-five have named only one 
more each. It is needless to say that practically all 
of the noted speed producing mares now in the breed- 
ing ranks are in this list, although it is not as large 
as those for others, like the Kentucky Futurity, and 
is due to the fact that only mares owned by members 
are eligible. The stakes are for three-year-olds alone,- 
with a total entrance fee of $155, of which $135 are 
due on aiarch Isi. the year of the race and at time of 
closing of entries at the meeting where the stake will 
be raced. At the rate of $35 and $100, the cost of 
carrying a colt or a filly to the year of the race, 
therefore, is $20 as yearling and two-year-old, re- 
.spectively, $5 and $15. 

Hemet Stock Farm Horses 

The death of W. F. Whittier will doubtless make 
many changes in the arrangements that were made 
in regard to the Hemet Stock Farm horses that are 
in charge of Fred Ward. It had been decided not to 
race last year's great yearlings Hemet Queen 2:16^/4 
and Edith Carter 2:181,4 as two-year-olds. Accord- 
ing to the Hemet News, however, the two-year-olds 
of last year were to be raced as three-year-olds, and 
payments had been made on them for their engage- 
ments. Zeta Lucile (2) 2:12% holds the Pacific 
coast record for two-year-old trotters and Louise de 
Lopez (2) 2:12% made a whirlwind campaign 
through the Middle West last year. 

Don de Lopez 2:16V4 is another trotter that was 
expected to be a big money-winner the coming year. 
Don de Lopez started fifteen times in the East last 
year and finished first twelve times, second twice 
and was out of the money once when he made a bad 
break. He was beaten only by a head in 2:11 last 
season and is eligible to the 2:17 class. 

Allie Lou (3) 2:12% won every stake in California 
in 1915 as a three-year-old and took more than $9,000 
in purses that year. Allie Lou was beaten by a frac- 
tion of a second in 2:07 time at Phoenix last fall and 
trotted three heats in better than 2:09. 

Harry R. 2:11% (half mile track) won four straight 
races on the Midway circuit in Kansas and Nebraska 
last season and is expected to be an excellent pacer 
this year. 

Sterling Lou 2:19Vi (half mile track) won three 
rp.ces in Iowa and Nebraska last year and is expected 
to be a good trotter the coming season. Many other 
horses at the farm were to be trained this spring. 

L. B. Brown of Denver Buys Direct Pointer. 

Mr. L. B. Brown, a wealthy Denver man, re- 
cently purchased a number of high class trotting 
bred mares and horses at the Chicago and other 
sales and turned them over to Joe Maguire. One of 
these horses is Direct Pointer, a very fine looking 
and wonderfully fast horse. He is by Baron Direct, 
dam Hallie Direct by Directly 2:03i/4, second dam 
by Sky Pointer, full brother to Star Pointer l:59i4. 
Maguire says this is the fastest horse he has ever 
seen, and when eleven months old the twentieth time 
the harness was put on him he paced an eighth in 
15 1-5 seconds. He was then sent back to the farm 
and has not been trained since. He is now seven 
years old, and it is believed will make a great sire. 
He now stands 15.3, weighs 1100 pounds and is a 
dark bay. 

Perhaps It Is Badger Boy 2:27%. 

Among the horses in training at the Phoenix, Ari- 
zona, track is a trawberry roan gelding by Vassar 
out of a mare by Badger Boy. This gelding is owned 
by Frank W. Efner and ,Iohn Howard, the last named 
being the trainer. Mr. Efner writes that the man 
from whom they bought the gelding could not tell 
much about Badger Boy. Perhaps this is the stallion 
Badger Boy, register number 12,429, trotting record 
2:27%, that died in Wisconsin in 1892. This horse 
was by Swigert 650, dam Badger Girl 2:22% by Black 
Flying Cloud 378. Mr. Efner's father, the late Geo. 
B. Efner, bred and raised Byron 2:25% that trotted 
the first mile better than 2:30 ever trotted in Erie 
county. New York. Byron was by Royal George. 

North Yakima Announces Purses. 

The Washington State Fair at North Yakima has 
decided to take the dates September 17th to 22d, and 
will hang up $6000 in purses for harness races. There 
will be five trotting and five pacing events. The 
freo-forall and 2:12 classes will be the fastest for 
the trotters and the free-for-all and 2:08 classes for 
the pacers. For these races purses of $700 will be 
offered ,and for the other class $500 and $600. No 
money will be offered the runners except what will 
be hung up for the Indians, and it is proposed to 
bring a large number of the aborigines and their 
horses to the fair. 



Saturday, Februay 3, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



HORSE NEWS FROM OREGON. 



Fred T. Merrill, of Portland, Oregon, is the breeder 
of the good pacer Oregon Hal 2:09^ recently sold 
by Warren Dennis to Thos. W. Murphy of New York. 
Mr. Merrill, in a quiet way, is a substantial breeder 
at his own farm and half mile track only a few miles 
from the center of Portland. He keeps a few choice 
broodmares and breeds them to the best stallions 
available. He has raised colts by Hal B., McKinney, 
The Bondsman, Cruzados and others of note. He 
bred the fast pacer Red Hal 2: 09 '4 and while a busy 
man with his real estate, his promotion of boxing 
events and other sports, yet finds time to visit and 
enjoy his horses, and to spend his money for the good 
of the harness horse game. He is a live wire. 

Messrs. Cox & Miller are now owners of the half 
mile track at Forest Grove, Oregon, having secured 
the plant from Capt. McCann of The Bondsman fame. 
In the deal they took over Capt. McCann's stallion, 
now five years old — Cavalier Gale. He is by Baron- 
gale 2:lli/t and his dam is Nella Jay (3) 2:14i4, 
winner of the $14,000 Kentucky Futurity in 1902, by 
Jayhawker. So Cavalier Gale needs no apology when 
it comes to a question of his breeding, for he is bred 
in the purple. As to his gameness, it is as good as 
his breeding. Last season was his first year out. 
Mr. Cox, who trained the colt, could not locate a 
lameness that came on early in spring and stayed 
with the roan colt all season. At times it was severe 
yet Cavalier Gale never at any time in any of his 
races quit trying to trot. He was on nearly evei-y 
Occasion outclassed and short of work on account of 
his lameness, yet he made the spectators cheer at 
his exhibition of gameness. It is to be hoped he 
will be trained this year and be ready and sound to 
race, also that Cox & Miller will advertise him and 
give him the opportunity that such a royally bred 
stallion is entitled to. The owners of good mares 
around Portland and points close to Forest Grove 
need not make the excuse that there is no good stal- 
lion in the district for Cavalier Gale is as well bred 
as any and a fast and game trotter besides. 

Cox & Miller own the great little race mare Lady 
Hal 2:0514 by Hal B. 2: 04 14. She was a sick ana 
sore mare all last season . When she met Zombrino 
at Vancouver she should have been in the hospital 
instead of out racing against such horses as Zom- 
brino and Sir Wilfred, but she put up a good race. 
At Centralia she was in a bad way but another Hal 
B. in Hal Paxton was there to entertain Zombrino, 
and while Hal Paxton was very lame yet he beat 
Zombrino at every station 'and put in three heats 
below 2:10. V.'hile I am at it I will say that Hal 
Paxton is to me the gamest race horse I ever saw, 
because he was a very lame horse at Yakima and 
Spokane yet he dared battle with the great Zom- 
brino without flinching. At Salem Dr. Patterson 
cocained his bad ankle and he got busy, and it took 
all Zombrino had that day to stave him off. I just 
make this statement out of respect for the game race 
horse Hal Paxton and his owner-trainer, Fred Wood- 
cock, and I know Zombrino is a great pacer and his 
trainer, Ted Bunch, as fine a man as I know in 
America. 

But back to Cox & Miller. Mr. Cox is one of Amer- 
ica's oldest trainers for he was a trainer years and 
years ago on the famous Jewett Farm in New York 
State, and he trained many famous horses — Jerome 
Eddy and many others. Now he has a real race track 
of his own and several grandly bred young horses, 
and everybody who knows him and his partner, Mr. 
Miller, v.-ill extend to them their most hearty good 
wishes. 

Every once in a while we read in the horse jour- 
nals an item to the effect that a horseman of ad- 
vanced age is training a light harness horse. Usu- 
ally these items are about men who live in rock- 
ribbed Maine, the Old Granite or the Nutmeg State. 
So I think it but right and proper to make an item 
about a man who trains a horse and lives in Oregon. 
His name is Peter Cook. He lives at Balston, Ore- 
gon, is a real live merchant and a successful one, and 
his age the last time I saw him, during the Oregon 
State Fair, was 74. Peter Cook trains and drives 
his own horses, and does it in addition to managing 
a large and prosperous general merchandise store. 
Every year Mr. Cook manages to have one or two 
horses ready to race, and whether the races begin 
July 4th or August 24th, Peter Cook is ready. Last 
season he went through the Oregon circuit with his 
good game and fast trotter Mark H., and every time 
he started this horse the other teamsters had to 
hustle and the spectators saw a real horse race. At 
Salem he started Mark H. against a good-sized field 
and won, giving the son of Como a mark of 2:17% 
and bringing the crowd to its feet in a wild burst of 
applause as he made a Peter Cook finish. He can 
sure high line a trotter, is not afraid of the cars, 
does not take the overland route nor tear around the 
first turn as though the Old Nick were after him, 
and can time a finish to a nicety. During one of the 
heats of this race last fall, when his driving was 
being cheered to the echo by the great crowd in the 
grand stand, Mr. Cook's hat blew off and his very 
bald head was exposed . Some one began to shout, 
"See the old bald-headed scout; why don't he wear 
hair?" To which comment a bright lady sitting near 
me made reply: "Peter Cook don't need hair on his 
head because he has real brains inside." This quick 
retort closed all further remarks about Peter's head. 

Besides owning Mark H., which horse by the way 
is a game, fast, reliable and good gaited trotter. Mr. 



Cook owns a veo' good-looking four-year-old horse 
named Kinney Wave by Tidal Wave 2:06','i, dam by 
McKinney. Mr. Cook traded Lottie Ansel 2:14%, a 
mare that the writer sold him a year ago, for this 
horse, that is young and sound and a fast pacer. Mr. 
Cook will have his pacer and trotter both ready 
when the 1917 races begin. Besides haivng his sport 
in summer Peter Cook winters his own horses, jogs 
them on the roads around Balston and in addition 
attends all the meetings of his Grand Army post, goes 
to every dance and social gathering and dances a 
minuet, a fox trot or turkey in the straw as accu- 
rately and gracefully as any man in Oregon. This 
is a long story, out it is about a good American. 1 
wish I knew many more such horsemen as Peter 
Cook. He is my interpretation of a real sportsman. 

C. A. HARRISON. 
o 

DEATH OF A ONCE PROMINENT HORSEMAN. 



[Communicated] 

Those lovers of the trotting horse whose recollec- 
tions extend back two'score years, will hear with 
regret of the recent death, in Chicago, of Mr. James 
Stinson. Mr. Stinson came of a Canadian family of 
prominence, wealth and fondness for sport. He was 
a man of large means, who came to Chicago before 
the civil war period, and was always known for his 
intense fondness for fine horses. In 1871 he took 
four of his horses. Volunteer, David, Tom and Satin- 
ette, and at the old Dexter Park Race Track, driving 
himself, he broke the world's four-in-hand record. 

For a period of some years after this he confined 
his attention to driving and riding horses, and he was 
a very lamiliar figure on the Chicago boulevards, at 
the Washington Park Club, and in the neighborhood 
of his beautiful mansion which stood in the midst of 
ten acres of park-like grounds on Drexel Boulevard. 

About 1885 he conceived the idea of producing, by 
careful breeding and changes of handling methods, 
a more natural trotter, from whom speed could be 
had without the use of such artificial aids as special 
shoes, tips, boots, check reins, etc. He attempted 
to carry this idea out, and for the purpose he pur- 
chased two stock farms, one at Thornton, 111,, and 
the other at Gary, Ind., which he equipped with spe- 
cial stables, tracks, and every facility for the training 
of his colts and horses. He purchased for his chief 
stallion Nutmeg 2:16, and quantities of brood mares 
and colts from various stock farms. Among his 
trainers were V. L. Shuler and Wm. McDonald. Budd 
DoMe also at times drove his horses. Mr. Stinson's 
ideas of haiidling horses were so revolutionary that 
he never obtained a trainer who could really compre- 
hend and carry them into execution. From boyhood 
they had all been used to the orthodox methods, from 
which they often got quick results, and they never 
really sympathized with his peculiar ideas. Another 
point on which they were not in sympathy was in 
the matter of racing the horses. The trainers were 
anxious for the glory and excitement of following the 
circuits; to Mr. Stinson this was repugnant — his sole 
interest was in improving an individual horse by 
handling, and improving them generally by breed- 
ing — for any glory, or to make money from his 
horses,, was a thing which was farthest from his 
desires. He was a disciple of the late Joseph Cairn 
Simpson and drove his horses shod only in tips; he 
used no boots, toeweights, check reins or any device 
to change their gait or stride; and he insisted that 
they be driven on a loose rein. Notwithstanding 
these methods he produced many fast trotters, and 
perhaps his crowning achievement came in 1892. It 
was from Mr. Simpson's book "Tips and Toeweights" 
that he obtained his ideas on shoeing. 

His four-in-hand record, made in 1871, stood as the 
world's best for seventeen years, when Mr. Gordon, 
of Cleveland, took Clingstone and three of his other 
best horses and, with a professional driver, broke it. 
In 1892 Mr. Stinson took four ot his colts, all sired 
by Nutmeg and bred by himself, then at the age of 
sixty-five, and without any artificial aids to their 
gaits, shod in tips, drove them at the Washington 
Park track, knocking eight seconds off of Mr. Gor- 
don's record, and making a world's record again, 
which probably still stands. 

The panic of 1893 swept away Mr. Stinson's great 
fortune, with all his breeding farms and horses. It 
came so soon after the period of their conception 
that enough time had not elapsed to test Mr. Stin- 
son's theories. 

Mr. Stinson loved all animals, but he was particu- 
larly devoted to the horse. His patience in training 
them was almost inexhaustible, and the results he 
obtained were astonishing to his fellow horsemen. 
By kindness, firmness and infinite perseverance he 
would take a nervous, rattle-headed horse and event- 
ually drive him on a loose rein. His method reveals 
his great patience. He could not stand a horse that 
pulled on the reins. As soon as his horse would 
start to pull Mr. Stinson would stop him and back a 
few steps, then start again, and the moment the 
horse ti)ok hold ho would stop and back again. He 
would keep this up for hours, sometimes backing the 
horse over a mile at a lime, but he was invariably 
successful in dominating the animal and obtaining 
his desired result. "White Hat" McCarthy of Cali- 
fornia once sold Mr. Stinson a very speedy but nerv- 
ou.'', rattle-headed mare. A year later Mr. McCarthy 
was passing through Chicago ,and went to see Mr. 
Stinson, who asked him to take a drive behind the 
mare. McCarthy, who knew her well, was by no 
means anxious to go, but did not like to refuse. He 



took a seat in the buggy ready to spring out any 
moment. To McCarthy's amazement the mare went 
along quietly on the loose rein and after driving a 
couple of miles they stopped, and the mare began 
to browse on the grass along the roadside. McCar- 
thy turned to Mr. Stinson and said that no one could 
have made him believe such a change in that animal 
was possible, if he had not himself seen it. This is 
merely one of many similar incidents where horse- 
men were astonished at his results. 

Mr. Stinson never sold a horse — he kept them until 
thev died. Sonu^times this trait seemed very strange, 
as the following incident will illustrate: He bought 
a colt that as a two-year-old showed great speed for 
that age . The following year he trained it, but no 
improvement developed, and this was repeated as a 
four and five-year-old, when it was manifest that he 
never would improve on the original speed he had 
shown at first . As he was a fine looking, showy 
horse, a neighbor made Mr. Stinson a very good 
offer to buy him. Mr. Stinson refused the offer, and 
on the same day gave orders for the horse to be 
taken out and killed. He felt that he was not good 
enough to keep, that he was useless on the farm, but 
he would not unload him on anyone else. 

Mr. Stinson's patience and philosophy, which were 
revealed in handling his horses, stood him in good 
stead in his latter years of reduced circumstances. 
He never complained of his reverses in fortune, or 
made the slightest references to his former opulence. 
Once, when the writer made an allusion to it, he 
smiled benignly and said that, like Socrates, he 
looked around and thanked Jove that there were so 
many things in this world that he did not want. 

He attained the ripe age of eighty-^ight years, and 
in his death the turf loses a follower who was Im- 
bued with the finest ideals. G. P. W. 

San Francisco, Jan. 26, 1916. 

o 

The Revolution in Racing. 

How racing has been revolutionized in the last 
forty years is shown by the records of 1876 compared 
with those of 1916. In the Centennial year 476 races 
were run in the United States, and of these 103 were 
heat races. Four vv-ere at four mile heats, four at 
three mile heats, eighteen at two mile heats and 
seventy-two at mile heats. Only one race reported 
was at a distance less than half a mile and only nine- 
teen were run at that distance, most of these being at 
fairs. 

There were ten dashes at five furlongs, forty-five 
at six furlongs and sixty-five at one mile. Forty-three 
were at a mile and a quarter, fifty at a mile and a 
half, twenty-eight at a mile and three-quarters, forty- 
four at two miles, seventeen at two miles and a half, 
seven at three miles and three at four miles. 

Statistics of last season are not yet available, but 
it is safe to say there was not a running race at any 
recognized meeting under the jurisdiction of the 
Jockey Club in which the horses had to repeat, even 
at the shortest of distances. Four mile races, once 
deemed to be the true test of an American thorough- 
bred, were unknown ,and substantially the same thing 
was true of races at three miles and at two miles, 
while the number of dashes at distances greater than 
a mile and a half was negligible. 

At some of the purely commercial meetings the 
program day after day showed no race at a distance 
so great as a mile. Even at Saratoga there was only 
one contest at a greater distance than a mile and 
a quarter in a month of racing, and at Belmont Park 
the Municipal Handicap and the Realization were the 
only exceptions on the program of the autumn meet- 
ing. 

Will Again Sell Thoroughbreds. 

The Fasig-Tipton Company has fitted up a pavilion 
at Saratoga and will return to the business of auc- 
tioning thoroughbreds. George Bain, who has been 
auctioneer for the trotting horse sales of (he com- 
pany, and who succeeded the late William Easton as 
a thoroughbred auctioneer, will fill that office, ana 
the contracts that have already been made suggest 
that he will have a very busy season. Some of the 
breeders who have booked their consignments for 
the Saratoga selling season are: Hal Prince Headley, 
with 28 yearlings, the get of Star Shoot; the Beau- 
mont Stud yearlings of Headley and Miller; Clarence 
H. Mackay's Ilara de Fresnay lot from Normandy, 
Fr-tnce; Williams and Radford's Adelbert Stud year- 
lings; J. S. Barbee's output from the Glen Helen 
Stud; O. H. Chenault's Spendthrift Stud lot; J. O. 
and G. H. Keene's Keeneland Stud and a number ot 
recently imported yearlings; Phil T. Chinn's im- 
ported thoroughbreds and the yearlings of White ana 
Giirnett and Edgar Renshaw. All of the other breed- 
ers of importance will probably send consignments, 
and the Fasig-Tipton Company bids fair to at once 
come back to the important position the company 
enjoyed in the thoroughbred field back in the days 
when they had commodious paddocks on Ocean ave- 
nue, opposite the old Sheepshead Bay racecourse, 
and when William Easton officiated so entertainingly 
on the block. 

* * * 

A dispatch from New York states that a butcher 
shop, in which horse meat is sold exclusively, has 
been opened in Harlem with the sanction of the board 
of health. A sign over the shop reads: "Horse flesh 
for sale liere." Round and sirloin steaks are quoted 
at 12 cents a pound, while inferior cuts sell as low 
as six cents a pound. Horse meat frankfurters re- 
tall at 10 cents a dozen. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1917 




James \V. Cromwell, one of the pioneer breeders 
of saddle horses in the country, died at his home 
near Cynthiana, Ky., Januarj^ 14. Mr. Cromwell, who 
was 76 years of age at the time of his death, never 
lost interest in the saddle horse and the shows. He 
was the breeder of Harrison Chief, the founder of 
fhe Chief family of saddle horses. He also owned 
Gaines' Denmark, to which all Denmarks trace, 
•i* + ♦ 

The four-year-old saddle mare, Willie McDonald, 
by McDonald Chief, which was recently sold by Mc- 
Cray Bros, of North Middletown, Ky., to Tom Cross 
of Chicago, was sold to Walter Hill of St. Paul dur- 
ing the Chicago show, and turned over to Tom Bass 
of Mexico, Mo., who exhibited her at the Denver 
show last week. From Denver she was shipped to 
Mr. Hill at Los Angeles, where he is spending the 
winter. The imported Hackney pony, Piccadilly, and 
two ponies were also shipped by Bass to Mr. Hill. 

♦ ♦ ♦ 

W. J. Gooch, secretary of the Kentucky State Fair, 
died recently at his home in Louisville. Mr. Gooch 
was formerly a member of the State Legislature and 
has been prominently identified with the live stock 
interest of the South. He was a very efficient secre- 
tary, but has only served one year. An effort is 
being made by friends of L. B. Shropshire, assistant 
secretary for many years ,to have him succeed Mr. 
Gooch. Mr. Shropshire is thoroughly familiar with 
the duties and his appointment would be a popular 
one. 

* * * 

Future Bids Fair For Saddle Horse. 

That the American saddle horse has the most 
promising future since the establishment of the 
breed and that the breeders who produce the right 
kind will find a stronger demand than they can sup- 
ply, practically at their own price, is the opinion of 
W. W. Pollock, banker-miller and planter-stockman, 
of Mexico, Mo., who was in San Francisco this week. 
Mr. Pollock was at one time part owner of the great- 
est saddle stallion the world has ever known. Rex 
McDonald 833 ,and at the present time his country- 
estate. Pollock Place, near Mexico, is well stocked 
with a magnificently bred herd of matrons. They 
represent such sires as Rex Denmark, Rex McDon- 
ald, Black Squirrel, Montrost Rex Chief A, and other 
famous stallions of the past and present. He bred 
Rex McD, the stallion that went to Kentucky a few 
seasons ago as the most promising son Rex McDon 
old ever sired. This horse was injured or the predic- 
tions would have been fulfilled. Mr. Pollock declares 
the present great demand for the saddle horses pro- 
duced in Missouri and Kentucky will grow with leaps 
and bounds and that the outlook for them is brighter 
than for any breed, despite the growing demand for 
weight in the collar. "Many prominent breeders have 
been mating their mares with jacks, and well bred, 
well educated, good looking, saddle horses, such as 
are wanted for riding in the parks of our cities, are 
as scarce as 'hen's teeth. Thost breeders who 
have the good judgment to raise good horses are 
going to be well paid for their efforts. Every one 
wants to ride and it is up to the producers to breed 
the kind that the business man can ride with a cer- 
tain amount of pleasure; the idea of believing they 
are ready when only a professional trainer can ride 
them must be abandoned and they must be abso- 
lutely mannered before they will find a buyer," said 
Mr. Pollock. 

In addition to being the leading miller of Missouri 
Mr. Pollock has one of the best bred herds of Short- 
horn cattle and Poland-China hogs in Missouri. 
o 

The "rail birds" of Missouri and Kentucky, and 
wherever horse shows are conducted in the Middle 
West, will have something to talk about when the 
bell is tapped at the opening of the summer shows. 
There are more fresh horses of sensational quality 
about to be uncovered than in several years. Some 
of them have already been seen on rare occasions 
but their performances at that time were not up to 
what is expected oi them since the season's devel- 
opment. Prominent among these that will open the 
eyes of the critics and cause applause in the grand 
stand, is Easter Girl, owned by Jas. Buford of Paris, 
Mo. This filly was shown by Buford in 1915 as a 
two-year-old, and won many prizes; however, she 



had a growing streak and in 1916 was not handled. 
She was left entirely alone, and the results have 
proven that it was good judgment on Buford's part, 
as she has developed into a beautiful mare of the 
big three-gaited type. She has broadened out to 
magnificent proportions, has a long fine turned 
neck, beautiful head with large expressive eyes, and 
a snappy, well balanced trot. She is another saddle 
bred one that is destined to become a three-gaited 
crack, having the qualifications of Pretty Baby, Grey- 
hurst and others that have proven winners. 

Buford also have a two-year-old stallion called Ima 
Dare, by My Major Dare ,that is, as he expresses it, 
a "doing fool": a three-year-old stallion that is going 
to be a real contender this year; a junior mare which 
will have to be reckoned with, and something for 
every class and stake. In fact, Buford will have the 
best stable of horses he has ever exhibited and he 
has them "tuned and trimmed" — and when the bell 
taps they will all know that "Jimmy" has been in 
the ring. 



Horse Shows For California. 

The season ot 1917 promises much in the way of 
county, district and state fairs for California. These 
associations which have been in progress in former 
years are expanding and the revival of a county and 
district fair is the "town talk" in many of the pro- 
gressive counties of California. The fairs are being 
organized into circuits so that the exhibitors of live 
stock — horses, cattle, sheep and swine — will find sev- 
eral weeks in which they can exploit their products 
before the interested public of the coast. Many herds 
of pure bred stock in California are being prepared 
for the show rings this season, which have never 
been exhibited before. The cause is that the people 
of the West are demanding stock that has won in 



competition with other herds; herd headers of real 
achievements, not idle boasts and claims of superi- 
ority; and, the opportunity now afforded, it will be 
profitable in an immediate cash return for exhibitors 
this year and in years to come, as it is profitable 
from an advertising standpoint, for there will be 
several weeks of continuous showing. 

An effort should be made by breeders and exhib- 
itors of saddle and show horses in California, of 
which there are a large number, to arrange with 
every one of these associations to conduct a horse 
show in connection with their fairs. If the proper 
attention is given this matter, there is no doubt but 
that every fair in California will arrange for a horse 
show along with a racing program and live stock ex- 
hibition. Once the associations are made to under- 
stand the great drawing card a horse show is ,they 
will not hesitate to promote one. 

However, the mistake of "just shoving it in" must 
not be made, as it has been thoroughly demonstrated 
that a horse show conducted early in the forenoon, 
before the races, or on the back track out of the way, 
does not pay. The exhibitions for show horses must 
be arranged on a good day, between races or — to be 
a real show — in the evening. The management of all 
leading fairs and stock shows of the country will 
attest to the popularity and profit of a horse show 
conducted along proper lines. At the International, 
the National Western ,and the American Royal shows 
the night horse show attracts greater crowds at bet- 
ter prices than any other attraction. At the Missouri, 
Illinois, Kentucky, Ohio and other state fairs the 
night horse shows make the fairs more interesting, 
and that result always pays the management. While 
the average county and district fair does not consider 



any other department until the horse show program 
is assured. 

"Yes, that is all well and good in that part of the 
country." some of the wiseacres have informed me. 
"But you can't do it in California." The writer 
knows that it can be done in California. There are 
scores of good show horses in this state and there 
are scores of others who, if they had an opportunity 
to make more than one or two shows a season, would 
"show you" whether it could be done in California 
or not. There is more of an opportunity for suc- 
cessful horse shows here than in any other state, 
and with the undisputed revival of the saddle horse 
it would be only a matter of a few years until there 
would be many breeders in California producing foals 
everv year, and it would be here, as elsewhere, one 
of the leading branches of the great diversification 
of live stock production. 

The writer has attended county fairs which were 
conducted in towns of two thousand population where 
a night horse show was conducted and where stand- 
ing room only was available in the grand stand and 
around the track. More than 2,000 automobiles were 
parked in the center field during a night show at 
Shelbina, Mo., two years ago. Despite the fact that 
the show was rained out the association cleared 
$2,000 on their horse show. Again, California has 
the advantage, in that there would not be the always 
expected rains which are so frequent in the Middle 
West at that season of the year. 

In addition to the California owned horses, many 
stables of the Middle West could be secured provid- 
ing there were as many as six shows. These exhib- 
itors are not particularly interested in the prizes; 
they are not looking for immediate returns in cash, 
but realize that a few successful shows will bring 
about the desired enthusiasm among the people, the 



horse lovers and the associations, and horse shows 
will be firmly established, that many sales will be 
brought about and the great American Saddle horse 
will have been successfully established in California 
and recognized as a profitable animal to breed. Cali- 
fornia's climatic conditions and winter resorts make 
it the ripest of all fields for the saddle horse in the 
future. The East has given way and admitted the 
horse with weight in the collar, and the saddle horse, 
are here to stay and the demand is growing. There 
is no "craze" or "boom" which will flourish only a 
fev; seasons, but a gradually increasing demand. The 
call of the horse is not of an insecure tenure. Its 
roots go down deep into the very heart of our nat- 
ural instincts and its operations are in accordance 
with laws as old as eternity and as immutable as 
truth. It will always be so. The horse is the great- 
est leveler of rank. The poorest, humblest being 
and the man of millions rub shoulders when King 
Horse is the attraction. 

« ♦ ♦ 

Thirty-two exhibitors won $1000 or more at last 
season's shows, according to the Saddle and Show 
Horse Chronicle. Miss Loula Long, of Kansas City, 
heads the list with $9,001 to her credit. Next in 
order is O. J. Mooers. another Western exhibitor, 
who hails from Columbia, Mo. His horses won 
$6,742. Others who won more than $5,000 were: 
James Cox Brad.v, of Gladstone, N. J., $5,770; Walter 
H. Hanley, of Providence, $5,300, and Miss Constance 
Vauclain, of Philadelphia, $5,195. William H. Moore, 
who topped the list at the National, was only twelfth 
in the list of winning owners for the season, with 
$3,150 to his credit. 




Saturday, Februay 3, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



7 



Notes and News 



Porterville, Tulare county, has decided to hold a 
live stock show and agricultural fair in October. 
* * * 

The State Fair track at Sacramento is reported to 
be in fine shape for working horses over this winter. 
4" «§• 4" 

More money to the breeder of the winners is the 
rule that many associations offering stakes are 
adopting. 

4" ♦ 

Programs in which there are $1000 purses are get- 
ting to be quite common on the eastern and middle 
west half mile tracks. 

4* ♦ 4* 

The California Circuit is forming. It begins to 
look as if fifteen weeks will not provide for all the 
tracks that want to get in. 

4» 4* 4* 

It is said that Trainer Earl Pitman refused an 
offer of $3000 for the pacer Billy Sunday, by Justo, 
during the Toronto ice races. 

4" 4» 4- 

The Madera County Fair Association is to be given 
a tract of 100 acres of land for fair purposes adja- 
cent to the town of Chowchilla. 

4" 4" 4* 

A. Edstrom of Oakland, now owns the old mare 
Fanadma 2:19i^ by Eros, dam Elma 2:24 by Elmo 
891, that was bred by the late John McCord of San 
Francisco. 

4* 4' "f* 

Tracks can no longer keep a distanced horse's 
money, as the rules do not permit of the former 
purse-saving condition: "Only one money to the 
winner." 

4" 4- 4" 

Helen Stiles 2: 06^4 that took her record in 1912 
may be raced in California again this year. She is 
now eligible under the new allowance rule to the 
2:12 class. 

4" 4' 4" 

The price paid for the California bred pacing mare 
Colleen 2:05^4 was $2500, and her new owner is 
Frank Luchsinger, of Monroe, Wisconsin. Airlie 
Frost will train and drive her. 

4- 4" 4" 

It is stated that thirty-nine out of forty of the 
mares that were bred to Robert Bingen 2: 11 14 
on the farm of his owner, Mr. E. D. Gould, of Kear- 
ney, Nebraska, are in foal. 

4> 4» 4" 

The free-for-all pace offered by the Connecticut 
Fair Association for its meeting next fall at Charter 
Oak Park has been made a purse of $2000 instead of 
$1500 as first announced. 

4' 4» 4' 

The four-year-old gelding by Kentucky Todd 
2:08?4, dam by Moko, that J. B. Stetson has in his 
string at Sacramento, is a well bred trotter that may 
be heard from this year. 

4* 4» 4* 

The Anvil 2:02% looks good enough to race again 
this year although he is not expected to be put in 
training. He is now eligible to the 2:07 class, his 
winrace record of 2: 03 'A having been made in 1913. 
4" 4* 4" 

The Grand Circuit will furnish fourteen consecu- 
tive weeks of harness racing this season. Detroit 
asked for an extra week this year and it will be the 
first time a two weeks' meeting was ever held in the 
"blue ribbon" city. 

4" 4* 4» 

And this in staid old Massachusetts: Four hun- 
dred thousand dollars is to be raised to construct 
a handsome grandstand and other buildings on the 
grounds of the Eastern States Fair and Exposition 
at Springfield, Mass. 

4" 4' 4> 

Joe Maguire of Denver has been very busy lately 
selling off the horses belonging to the Gumaer Es- 
tate. Two sales were held in Denver and 80 head 
were sold in Chicago. There were 204 head sold 
altogether and they brought fair prices. 

4' 4" 4" 

French Devereux, son of H. K. Devereux, the well 
known Cleveland horseman, a member of Troop A., 
the noted Cleveland cavalry organization, has been 
appointed on the staff of General Bell and in conse- 
quence becomes a member of the regular army. 
4. 4. 4. 

The setter dog owned by Mr. H. K. Devereux, the 
Cleveland patron of harness racing sports, was de- 
clared the winner of the Derby of the National Field 
Trials Club, concluded recently at Calhoun, Ala. 
There were 24 starters in the derby and the compe- 
tion was unusually keen. 

4- 4- 4- 

Henry Smith of Pleasanton lost by death this week 
his mare Delia H. 2:10 by Hal B. 2:04i/i, dam Jessie 
M. (dam of Hal J. 2:09V4) by Del Norte. Delia H. 
was bred by H. E. Armstrong, former owner of the 
Pleasanton track and made her record at Fresno in 
1913. We did not learn the cause of this mare's 
death. 



The late Admiral Dewey was a great lover of the 
trotting horse and owned a very handsome pair of 
matched trotters that drew his carriage in Washing- 
ton. He never was induced to part with them in 
favor of an automobile. 

4. 4. 4. 

Guacho 56147, the seven-year-old stallion bred by 
L. Todliunter of Sacramento, took a record of 2:27V.i 
in a race at Grand Island, Nebraska, last summer. 
He is by the young stallion Nobage 48390 and his 
dam is by Zombell by Zoiiibro, second dam The 
Silver Bell, dam of seven in the list. 
, 4* 4> 4> 

Dick McMahon hns shipped all his horses to Ma- 
con, Georgia. Besides the four youngsters sent from 
PlcRsaiiton those in the string belonging to R. J. 
MacKenzie are Miss Perfection 2:07 \i, Pointer 
Queen p. 2:121.1, and Anvilite (2) 2:22i/i, now a four- 
year-old. 

4" 4> 4» 

There is a two-year-old trotting colt in training at 
Youngstown, Ohio, that is very highly thought of 
and whose breeding would interest any Californian 
who should happen to visit the track, as he is by San 
Francisco 2:07%, dam Miss Georgia 2:08% by Mc- 
Kinney 2: 11 14. 

4» 4* 4' 

Joseph Waddell, secretary of the California Fair 
and Racing Association, who visited Salinas last Sat- 
urday, says the track there is in good shape. Henry 
Helman, who is the lessee of the track, told him a 
coating of clay was put on the track in the fall of 
1915, and it is now a fast and safe track. 

4* 4* 4» 

Louise Carter and Lady Zombro, two of Hemet 
Stock Farm's best mares, have been booked to Budd 
Doble's stallion Kinney de Lopez 2:23 this season. 
The first named mare is the dam of Wilbur Lou (1) 
2::19% (3) 2:10V,, Mamie Alwin 2:12 and Edith 
Carter (1) 2:18V4, the last named being by Kinney de 
Lopez. Lady Zombro is the dam of three in the list. 
4* 4* 4* 

It is reported that an offer of $30,000 was recently 
made and refused for Wilkes Brewer 2:081/4, the Nut- 
wood Wilkes mare that was unbeaten on the half 
mile tracks last year. Whenever a trotter is fast 
and sound enough to be a good prospect in the fast 
classes there is no trouble about getting a good price 
for him, 

4» 4- 4' 

W. E. D. Stokes, owner of Prtchen Wilkes Stock 
Farm, Lexington, Ky., has just issued a book which 
horsemen will be interested in. The title is "The 
Right to be We\l Boni," or "Horf-e Breeding in Its 
Relations to Eugenics." The work is furnished by 
all American News Company's stands and book 
stores. 

4» 4" 4» 

After the death of Guy Cressey, a milkman of 
Westbrook, Me., no one knew his milk route, and it 
was not until Mr. Cressey's horse, which had trav- 
eled the route for five years, was hitched up and 
permifted to have a free rein, that the course was 
discovered. The horse made the trip and stopped at 
the door of every customer except one. 

4" 4» 4» 

A Mr. Hafner, of Agram, Austria, is the owner of 
160 head of trotting bred stallions, mares and colts 
and engages extensively in breeding trotters. He 
owns Baron McKinney 2:10Vi, the sire of Spriggan 
2: 08 14 and Al Stanley 2:08V). sire of Etawah 2:03. 
Geo. Bodimei", well known American trainer, is the 
superintendent and trains the youngsters. 

4" 4* 4* 

The announcement has been officially made that 
Mr. C. K. G. Billings, of Santa Barbara, will sell 
Curies Neck Farm in Virginia and all the horses 
thereon except Lou Dillon and Uhlan, but no state- 
ment has come from Mr. Billings that he will estab- 
lish a trotting horse breeding farm in California, as 
some of the newspapers have I'eported. 

4* 4" 4" 

At a meeting of the Riverside Fair Association held 
last week C. H. Lewis, of Riverside, was elected 
president, J. F. Backstrand vice-president, A. H. 
Brouse of the National Bank of Riverside, treasurer. 
President I.,ewis was empowered to appoint a com- 
mittee of five directors to act with himself in select- 
ing a secretary. The person selected will be paid a 
salary and be required to devote his entire time to 
the work of the annual fair in September. 

4" 4» 4" 

Here is something for the theorists to study over. 
About 66,000 trotting and pacing stallions have been 
registered as standard. The official number of 2:30 
or better trotters up to the close of 1916 is 32,938. 
The official number of pac(>rs, up to the same date, is 
24,738, or a grand total of 56,676 standard perform- 
ers. Thus the official records show that the regis- 
tered standard stallions have not sired an average 
of one standard performer each. 

4. 4. 4. 

The new plan of awarding the prizes in the $21,000 
Kentucky Futurity which is for foals of 1917 and 
will close April 1st, is as follows: Three-year-old 
division, $14,000, divided: Winner $8000, second 
,?2500, third $1000, fourth $500: nominators of dams, 
winner $1000, second $500, third $300, fourth $100, 
,fth $75, sixth $25. Two-year-old division, $7000, di- 
vided: Winner $4000, second $1250, third $500, 
fourth •?250; nominators of dams, winner $500, sec- 
ond $2.50, third $100, fourth $75, fifth $50, sixth $25. 



Al the P'orbury Park, New Zealand, trotting meet- 
ing last month, the get of Harold Dillon won six 
races. Harold Dillon is an own brother to Dillcara, 
the trotting stallion owned by the late Dr. C. E. 
Farnum, and that is now in the stud at Pleasanton 
Race Track. 

4- 4- 4- 

Friend C. A. Harrison of Seattle, who is always 
doing something to arouse and increase interest in 
the breeding and racing of trotters and pacers, writes 
that he hopes Sunkist California will arrange this 
year for racing to begin earlier and last longer, and 
that the old custom of lO^A. months of training and 
6 weeks' racing will be changed. 

4- 4- 4- 

The unusually cold winter we have been having in 
California has prevented the California trainers from 
doing much with their horses at any of the tracks, 
as it goes against a California trainer's grain to do 
much riding when the mercury is down as low as 40 
degrees above zero in the morning. Warm days are 
coming, however, and the training tracks will be 
bu.sy places by the first of March. 

4" 4» 4" 

When figuring that your trotter or pacer will be 
given an allowance of one second for each year that 
he has not equaled or lowered his record since it 
was made, don't figure in 1917. If your horse made 
his record of 2:10 in 1912, he will be allowed one 
second for each of the years 1913, 1914, 1915 and 
1916, or four seconds in all. The season of 1917 has 
not been raced yet. 

4. 4. 4. 

W. E. Detels has turned his two-year-old filly by 
Onward McGregor 2:23, dam Bonnie Melba by Bon 
Guy 2:091,4. over to Dan Hoffman who will have her 
trained by Millard Sanders at Pleasanton. She is 
entered in the Pacific Breeders' Futurity. Her sec- 
ond dam is Melba T. (dam of May Twohig 2:15 and 
Charley 2d 2:25), by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16V^, third 
dam Myra by California Nutwood. 

4" 4" 4* 

Hon. David Tod, the widely known Youngstown, 
Ohio, horseman and owner of the Southern Park 
track, has decided to send his racing string to Bil- 
lings Park track, Memphis, Tenn., for winter training. 
The string is in charge of Trainer Cecil Traynor and 
contains several high class racing prospects, includ- 
ing some high-priced youngsters which Mr. Tod 
bought at the last Old Glory sale. 

4* ♦ 4» 

Winnipeg, Manitoba, is one of the towns of the 
Northwest that the European war has changed, so 
far as fairs are concerned. The former annual ex- 
hibitions of the Winnipeg Fair Association are not 
being held, the fair association having gone out ot 
existence two years ago, since which time the 
grounds and buildings have been used for military 
purposes. Some years ago the city acquired land 
which was generally understood would, sooner or 
later, be utilized for fair purposes, but at present the 
plot has been advanced to a very attractive park. The 
prospect for the fair feature in connection is said to 
be unlikely to be realized, at least until after the 
war. 

o 

The Vancouver, B. C, Program. 

Following is the program of harness and running 
races announced for the meeting at Vancouver, B. C, 
which opens August 21st: 

Tuesday, August 21 — 2:15 pace, $1000; free-for-all 
trot, early closing, three in five, $800; running, half 
mile dash, no entry fee, $100; local 2:15 pace, early 
closing, no entry fee, $100. 

Wednesday, August 22. — 2:15 trot, early closing, 
$700; three-year-old pace, early closing, $300; run- 
ning, one mile dash, no entry fee, $125; local 2:20 
trot, early closing, no entry fee, $100. 

Thursday, August 23. — 2:20 pace, $500; three-year- 
old trot, early closing, $300; running, half mile dash, 
no entry fee, $100; local 2:25 pace, early closing, no 
entry fee, $100. 

Friday, August 24. — 2:20 trot, early closing, $500: 
frop-forall pace, early closing, three in five, $800; 
running, i'w furlongs, no entry fee, $100; local 2:30 
trot, early closing, no entry fee, $100. 

Saturday, August 25.-2:25 trot, $1,000; 2:25 pace, 
$500; running, one nyle, no entry fee, $100; local 
race, early closing. Fields & Boyd trophy. 

In local races drivers must be amateurs and horses 
must start three times in British Columbia matinees 
during the season. 

o 

ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 



Henry E. Bean, Los Angeles, Cal.: The "Weekly 
News Letter" is issued every week by the United 
States Department of Agriculture and can be ob- 
tained by writing to that department at Washington, 
D. C. 

* • * 

L. C. D., Sacramento: The stallion Don Marvin 
2:28 was sired by Fallis, son of Electioneer. Don 
Marvin's dam was Cora by Don Victor, a son of 
Williamson's Belmont. While the index of the 
Index Digest gives Don Marvin as by Phallas it is 
an error in spelling as the correct register number 
of Fallis (4781) is given. Phallas 2:13%, one time 
champion trotting stallion, was by Dictator, but was 
not the sire of Don Marvin. 

o 

Ed Geers had his 66th birthday on January 25th. 



8 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1917 




ROD. GUN AND KENNEL 

CONDUCTED BY FISHER HUNT 



D 

Coursing at Sacramento. — Some of the fastest 
hounds in the stale are entered in the next coursing 
meet of the Capital City Coursing club, to be held 
at Franklin on Sunday, February 11. Although the 
entries for the meet do not close until February 5, 
Eugene Panario, secretary of the club, has already 
received entries from a number of dog owners at the 
bay. The drawings will be made on February 8. 

Two stakes will be run off during the day. One 
of them, termed the Championship stake, for 16 
dogs, is the biggest event of the season. Such dogs 
as Los Molinos, San Pablo Girl, Irish Linnet, Hell- 
ovsr Swell, Mayhews Boy, Wild Night, Expensive 
Board, Steam Trawler, Blue Bells, Young Blackie and 
Oakland Girl, have already been entered in this 
stake, which carries a $60 first prize, a $40 second 
prize, $20 prizes for fourth and fifth places, and $5 
prizes for sixth, seventh and eighth places. 

The other event of the day is a 16-dog membership 
stake. Entries for this stake are already coming in. 

Live Fish, 3,800 Feet Down. — A correspondent, 
writing to the current issue of the Fishing Gazette, 
describes the taking of live fish from the bottom of 
a Transvaal gold mine. "The fish," he states, "were 
found in the catchment at the 900 ft. level, and also 
at the bottom of the shaft. The particular shaft 
from which they came is vertical and 3800 feet deep. 
The fact that they were found alive at the bottom as 
well shows, I think, that they must have been merely 
spawn when they fell. The fish I have seen were 
barbel, very light in color, and from 6 in. to 12 in. 
long, and up to %-lb. in weight. They were not 
nearly as black as the river barbel we get here. 
What on earth they find at the bottom of a shaft in 
the way of food I can't think. However, they appar- 
ently thrive. Frogs and water-snakes are much more 
common than fish. In exceptionally dry weather 
small bull-frogs have been seen to distend themselves 
and deliberately jump down the shaft .apparently in 
search of water." 

Anglers at Legislature. — Portland, Ore. — Over 50 
strong, Multnomah county sportsmen and anglers in- 
vaded the state capital on January 25th in a special 
train and presented their views on the closing of the 
Willamette river to commercial fishing to the joint 
fisheries committee of the legislature. 

After the hearing, which lasted for nearly three 
hours and during which both sides had equal oppor- 
tunities to express themselves, a number of Mult- 
nomah sportsmen stated they were of the opinion 
that the bill would be passed by both houses. 

Master Fish Warden Clanton was among those 
present at the hearing, and he gave the committee 
some very interesting data on the conditions at the 
Oregon City falls, recommending that another fish 
ladder be constructed. 

Among the prominent speakers for the anglers 
were Arthur I. Moult on and Walter Backus, District 
Attorney Hedges of Oregon City, carried on the flghi 
against closing the river to net fishermen. 

QB 

Raising Wild Game. — The raising of "wild game" 
is a comparatively new industry in this country, but 
has been making remarkable strides in the past 
twelve months, according to the report of the Game 
Conservation Society. The society's membership in- 
cludes many breeders who have established game 
farms for the purpose of renewing the country's sup- 
ply of game fowl. This supply, according to mem- 
bers of the society, was rapidly diminishing until a 
year or so ago, and many of the most delectable 
forms of wild fowl that had formerly been plentiful 
in this country had become rare dishes even for epi- 
cures. Wild ducks and pheasants are among the 
varieties of fowl that are being raised by the breed- 
ers at the present time, and according to the society's 
report the former have become so plentiful through 
this method in some States that they have appeared 
on the market at prices which place wild ducks 
within the range of the public generally instead of 
the rich alone. In Minnesota, the report states, wild 
ducks sold at $1 each this year. It is suggested in 
this report that at the present rate wild ducks and 
other formerly rare fowl may actually tend to lower 
the cost of the more commonplace heats of daily con- 
sumption. "Thirty-five Slates now have laws permit- 
ting the breeding and sale of all or certain species 
of game ,and many game farms have been started in 
other Slates in anticipation of laws encouraging the 
industry," the annual report says. "Reports coming 
to the society indicate that all of the Stales and some 
of the Provinces of Canada soon will permit and 
encourage game breeding. Reports coming to our 
game census indicate that our members have over 
a million game bird."? — there were fewer than 100,000 
reported last year — and that they have several limes 
as many deer and elk a.s they had last year. The 
membership of the society has doubled during the 
year, and our list shows a very rapid increase. The 
breeding of quail and grouse has been started in the 
Western States, and there is much interest in quail 



1 

breeding in the Southern States, which are well 
adapted to the production of quail in big numbers." 
Despite the fact that hundreds of thousands of pheas- 
ants have been raised by the breeders, the report 
says, the prices have continued to rise because im- 
porters have been prevented from bringing these 
birds from foreign countries. The report also stales 
that the breeding of game fish is beginning to attract 
widespread attention and to prove highly profitable. 

c« 

BILL TO ABOLISH GAME COMMISSION. 



Hot Fight Looms Up When Legislature Meets Again; 
Duck Season Is Now Over. 



The duck hunting season came to an official close 
on Wednesday. Fairly good sport was enjoyed in 
the closing days, although the sport has been on the 
decline since practically the first of the year. Up 
until that time ducks were more plentiful and more 
limit bags were reported than in several years past. 

Attention will now be focussed on the numerous 
bills that have made their appearance in the Califor- 
nia Legislature. The lawmakers put in the first ses- 
sion, which ended January 26th, in introducing meas- 
ures and they have adjourned until February 26th, 
when the business of getting through the acts will 
commence in earnest. 

Fish and game bills have been introduced in abun- 
dance. Many are the changes that have been advo- 
cated. By far the most important is the one having 
the backing of J. B. Hauer, providing for the aboli- 
tion of the present commission, in favor of a single 
commissionership with a salary of $5,000. Ernest 
Schaeffle, former executive officer of the commission, 
denies the charge of President Frank M. Newben 
that he drew up the bill but he says that he is in 
favor of the idea. 

The I'ish and Game Commission is perturbed by 
the measure, more than the dozens of other bills 
that are pending. It charges Hauer with trying to 
settle a personal grievance and says that the Cali- 
fornia State Fish, Game and Forest Protective 
League, of which he is president, has only a limit 
number of disgnmtled members. Both sides have 
beeen firing back and forth in the daily papers and 
a hot fight looms up. 

Spoonies and teal everywhere is the way in which 
hunters tell of their last Sunday's sport in the San 
Joaquin country. Some hunters near Los Banos 
found that they could step from the blinds and pick 
the birds in the open. Most all of those who ven- 
tured out secured limits, or near-limits. 

While the tenor of reports from the northern sec- 
tion is not quite so encouraging, the shooting has 
been fair. Gridley, Live Oaks and the whole of the 
rice field country produced some fine bags. 

Word From the South. — Los Angeles, Cal. — Duck 
sea.;on wound up Wednesday night with a general 
celebration on the part of duck clubs and unatached 
hunters alike, although from present prospects there 
is not likely to be very much to celebrate, as the tail- 
end of a poor season is to be laid away with such 
obsequies as may seem fitting. 

A few gunners are away now on wind-up trips, the 
desire to bo in at the finish being as strong as the 
disinclination to be left out at the beginning. Best 
prospects exist down Imperial way. 

Deputy Fish and Game Commissioner W. R. Ma- 
lone of San Bernardino reports good shooting on 
San Jacinto lake, a flooded basin north of that town, 
formed by rain water collecting and comprising per- 
haps 200 acres now. The sprig are out that way, 
feeding upon the seed barley of the ranchers, it 
being a great grain country. Geese are reported 
plentiful also. 

San Bernardino sportsmen have been successful 
in securing the introduction of a bill to prevent 
shooting at ducks from any boat propelled by power 
or with anything more powerful in her than a pair 
of oars — man power. Power was abused on Bear 
lake last fall and many think it injured the shooting 
very seriously. 

Bear Valley is now inaccessible except by snow- 
shoes, some photographs which came down two 
weeks ago showing snow up to the porches of the 
cabins. 

Some local sportsmen have become excited over 
bills which they have been passing around calling 
for radical changes in the game laws, but as these 
all have to be passed upon by a committee of level- 
headed fellows whose duty is to weed out the im- 
practicable and unjust measures, worrying is confined 
to those who think every bill introduced is already 
law. 

The State Fish and Game Association will recom- 
mend to the Pennsylvania Legislature the adoption 
of a fishint: license bill. The receipts from such a 
measure would go towards the propagation of fish. 



UNLICENSED DOGS HAVE NO STATUS. 



Supreme Court Decides Owner Cannot Recover Loss 
Unless Pet Is Registered. 

Dogs not licensed have no legal status, is the gist 
of a ruling recently made by Irving G. Hubbs, a Jus- 
tice of the New York State Supreme Court, in a test 
case at Fulton, N. Y. No doubt it is the most impor- 
tant ruling that has been passed in years affecting 
New York State dog owners. It will also carry weight 
in all other States of the Union. 

A great many ot the States have laws requiring all 
dogs to be licensed. It has always been one of the 
favorite hobbies of legislators of the hayseed type 
to annually bring up a bill imposing taxes on dogs 
and dog owners. It is only a short time ago that New 
York had to array itself against a Senator who tried 
his utmost to have a bill passed which more than 
doubled the tax on dogs and further attempted to 
restrict the number of dogs and make preference for 
the so-called farmer dogs. 

Scarcely a month later Pennsylvania fanciers had 
to fight against the passing of a law that gave any 
one the right to kill dogs found running at large. 
That old bugaboo sheep killing is always brought 
out strong by anti-dog legislators, who magnify the 
number of sheep killed by dogs until they run into 
the millions. 

A Troy fancier effectively killed all attempts to 
overtax dogs by showing how ridiculous was the 
assertion of the Senator who fathered the bill that 
the dogs of the State killed so many sheep. He 
showed that by the government census there was not 
the number of sheep in the State that the Senator 
claimed were killed annually by dogs. 

Dog people have always been heavily imposed upon 
in the matter of licenses and extra taxation, and it is 
only by constant struggle that fanciers have been 
able to prevent their being legislated out of exist- 
ence. This latest ruling of Justice Hobbs is of the 
most vital importance, and dog fanciers and breeders 
throughout the country would do well to organize 
now. 

The decision — in a nutshell — is that if a dog is not 
licensed you cannot recover for his loss. If a man 
applies for a license and does not get one, according 
to Justice Hobbs" interpretation of the statute gov- 
erning the licensing of dogs, and allows his dog to 
run at large, he cannot recover the value of the ani- 
mal if the latter is destroyed. Instead, before he 
may recover for their loss, a man must keep his 
dogs locked up until such time as he has obtained 
licenses. 

Justice Hobbs' ruling was made in granting a 
non-suit to the defendant in a test action brought by 
Frederick L. Ingersoll, of Fulton, against Thomas, 
George and William Lanning, of the town of Volney. 
Mr. Ingersoll alleged that the defendants killed two 
dogs ,a foxhound and a setter, valued at about $150. 
The killing of the dogs occurred a few days after 
Mr. Ingersoll had applied for licenses and had been 
refused them at the City Clerk's office in the city of 
Fulton. The clerk at the office told Mr. Ingersoll, 
it was stated, that they had not yet begun to issue 
dog licenses for the year. 

It was said that the dogs ran on the Fanning place 
and created much havoc among Belgian hares raised 
there for the market. It was alleged the Fannings 
killed the dogs and buried them on the place. The 
action was then brought by Mr. Ingersoll to recover 
the value of the dogs. 

The lawyer appearing for Mr. Ingersoll argued at 
length in opposition to the non-suit, stating that his 
client had acted in good faith in the matter, and held 
that his client should not be made to suffer because 
of the Fulton City Clerk's failure to provide a license. 
The Court decided the statute was mandatory and 
refused to allow the case to go to the jury. 

The colloquy between the Court and counsel 
brought out the fact that all were dog owners, the 
Court admitting the ownership of two, and counsel 
for both sides as well. The decision has already led 
to a large increase in the number of dog licenses 
issued in Fulton and adjoining counties. 

In other words, if for any reason your license 
lapses or your dog is not licensed you cannot recover 
for his value in case of injury or death. He has no 
legal status, nor does your ownership count as worth 
anything unless your dog is licensed. The impor- 
tance of the ruling is due to the fact that some one 
will contend that if your dog is not licensed you 
cannot transfer ownership — cannot sell your dog 
unless he is licensed. It affects every dog owner, 
not only in New York State but throughout the coun- 
try. 

* * * 

It is at best a daring thing to challenge everybody 
in the country to produce a better dog than the one 
you own, but Mrs. Ida H. Garrett goes even farther 
and challenges anybody from any part of the globe 
to produce a better Chihuahua. Mrs. Garrett is the 
proud owner of a dog of her own breeding, the breed- 
ing going back three generations in her own owner- 
ship. The dog weighs but one pound, and she claims 
is the best Chihuahua ever reared. To back her 
opinion Mrs. Garrett is ready to arrange a match 
for $100 a side with anybody who can produce one 
as lively, as healthy, as small and as perfect as this 
young dog of her breeding. One pound can well be 
.said to be the lowest weight for any dog, and is a 
record even for this tiniest of small breeds, the Chi- 
huahua. 



Saturday, Februay 3, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



9 



THE BEST TRAPSHOOTING TEAMS. 



Only a Fraction of Target Difference in Averages of 
20 Highest Professionals and Amateurs. 



Ten Professional Trapshots. 

Shooter — Residence Shot. Bke. % 

Homer Clark, Alton, 111 

L. S. German, Aberdeen, Md.... 

W. R. Crosby, O'Fallon, 111 

C. G .Spencer, St. Louis, Mo.... 

C. A. Voung, Springfield ,0 

Art Killam, St. Louis, Mo 

E. L. Mitchell, Los Angeles, Cal., 

Rush Razee, Curtis, Neb 

J. R. Taylor, Newark, O 

H. D. Gibbs. Union City, Tenn... 

Totals: Shot at 39.420, broke 38,142, average 
Ten Leading Amateurs. 



2100 


2058 


4700 


4573 


5545 


5367 


5160 


4988 


3690 


3565 


6535 


6310 


2200 


2124 


2190 


2114 


4250 


4101 


3050 


2942 



.9800 
.9729 
.9678 
.9666 
.9661 
.9655 
.9654 
.9652 
.9649 
.9645 
9676. 



Shooter — Residence 



Fred Harlow, Newark, O 

Mark Arie, Thomasboro, 111 

W. Henderson, Lexington, Ky. . . 

A. King, Delta, Cal 

B. Richardson, Dover, Del.... 

Bonser, Cincinnati, O 

J. Pendergast, Phoenix, N. Y. 

H. Peck, Remington, Ind 

Pfirrmann, Los Angeles, Cal. 



Shot. Bke. % 



. 2010 1964 .9771 
. 2400 2337 .9737 
. 2650 2572 .9705 
. 2000 1936 .9680 
* 3435 3316 .9653 
. 2000 1929 .9645 
. 2250 2168 .9635 
. 2460 2364 .9609 
.12100 2017.9604 

F. A. Graper, Castor Park, 111 |4250 4074 .9585 

Totals: Shot 25,555, broke 24,677, average .9656. 
There is but slight difference in the ability of the 
professional and amateur trapshot. 

The 1916 averages compiled by the Interstate As- 
sociation for the Encouragement of Trapshooting, 
and just issued by Secretary Shaner, show there is 
but a fraction of a target difference in the percent- 
age of the highest 20 trapshooters — 10 amateurs and 
10 professionals. 

The professionals have the edge — but it isn't much. 
The fellows who make a living "busting" the blue 
rocks broke 38,142 out of 39,420 targets for a com- 
bined average of .9676. The 10 leading amateurs 
broke 24.677 targets of the 25,555 for a grand average 
of .9656. The 20 trapshooters shot at 64,975 targets 
and averaged .9666. That is what you call "busting" 
the targets with a vengeance. 

The fact that the professionals had a slight advan- 
tage on the amateurs in the averages doesn't neces- 
sarily mean that the professionals would beat the 
amateurs in a team match. The amateurs in the 
select 10 are a fine bunch of trapshots. One of the 
amateurs listed is the late A. B. Richardson, of Do- 
ver, Del. The eleventh amateur on the list is J. R. 
Jahn, of Davenport, la., who had an average of .9565 
— and in the winter league competition he would have 
to be listed in the place of Richardson. 

In the 1915 averages also the professionals had a 
slight advantage on the amateurs — the figures being 
.9617 to .9604. The best professional shots vary but 
little in their shooting from year to year. Only two 
of the men who were in the first 10 in 1915 failed to 
get in in 1916. Henderson, Richardson and Graper 
are the only amateurs to get in the select circle of 
amateurs in 1915 and 1916. 

There are a couple of singular things in connec- 
tion with the averages. Phil. Miller, the professional 
champion, and Frank Troeh, the amateur champion, 
were twenty-fifth in their respective divisions, and 
both the amateurs and professionals had 31 shooters 
with an average of 95 or better. The amateurs had 
9 over 96 and 3 over 97. The professionals had 16 
over 96, 3 over 97 and one with 98. Ralph Spotts, 
the amateur champion at 200 targets, was eighteenth 
on the li.st. 

Mrs. Adolph Topperwein, the only woman profes- 
sional shot, broke 2539 of the 2690 targets trapped 
for her for an average of .9438, and George Maxwell, 
the one-armed professional shot, broke 3439 out the 
3640 targets thrown for him for an average of .9447. 

Fred Gilbert, the wizard of Spirit Lake, shot at 
more targets than any other trapshooter in 1916 — 
9690, and averaged .9543. O. N. Ford, of San Jose, 
Cal., shot at more targets than any amateur — 6580, 
and averaged .9431. A shooter had to fire at more 
than 2000 targets to get recognition in the inter- 
state list. 

In the doubles Frank Troeh led the amateurs with 
an average of .8750, and C. G. Spencer led the pro- 
fessionals with an average of 90. Six professionals 
bettered 80, and four amateurs reached that mark. 
Altogether the shooting was better in 1916 than in 
any year in the history of trapshooting. 

% 

Idaho Averages. — The averages of Idaho shooters 
follow : — 

Amateurs. — Adelman, A. G., Boise, shot 200, broke 
182, average .9100; Addison, D., Boise. 200—166, 
.8300; Allen, O. W., Boise, 200—161, .9050. 

Bailey, C. A., Twin Falls, 300—275, .9166; Beck- 
man, Ed., Lewiston, 150—131, .8733; Beckman, Geo., 
Lewiston, 670- 589, .8701; Bennett, Nellie, Hollister, 
150—118, .7866; Biwer. E. T., Boise, 200—163, .8150; 
Brooks, E. R., Clear Lake, 150—142, .9466; Brooks, 
Dr. E. E., Kellogg, 300—259, .8633; Butler, C. E., Lew- 
iston, 450—365, .8111. 

Channel, C. B., Twin Falls, 300—239, .7966; Coates, 
R. J., Jerome, 300- 276, .9200. 

Deklotz, John G., Filer, 300—266, .8866; Dresser, 
Dr. Harold, Boise, 940—700, .8440. 

Eastman, J. O., Buhl, 150—116, .7763; Erb, R. S., 
Lewiston, 300- -236, .7866. 

Farmin, E. D., Sand Point, 640—535, 8359; Fisher, 



D. C, Grangeville, 50- 53, .8833; Fisher, A. G.. Twin 
Falls. 300—275, .9166; Fitzgerald, Edw., Burley, 700 
—625, .8928! Freeman, Gaylord, Buhl, 150—124, .8266; 
Frifcher, T. D., Buhl, 150—112, .7466. 

Garber, A. S., Nanipa, 90—69, .7666; Garvin, P. P.. 
Boise. 200—141, .7050; Gibbs, C. W., Wallace, 60—26, 
.4333; Gilmore, G. K., Wallace, 300—241, .8033; 
Green, C. B., Moscow, 450—378, .8400; Gregory. P. J., 
Boise, 200—157, .7850; Grice, E. G., Boise, 740—674, 
.9108. 

Hahn, Chas., Lewiston, 300—279, .9300; Hargraves, 
C, Boise, 200—137, .6850; Harvey, G. H., Boise, 90— 
64, .7111; Heitler, Dr. A. W., Burley, 150—114, .7600; 
Hill, R. C, Lewiston, 300—260. .8666; Molohan. D. J., 
Burley, 640 -601, .9390; Hopffgarten. J. H.. Boise, 200 
—167, .8350; Humphreys, W. H., Boise. 200—181, 
.9050. 

Ingersoll, W. E., Kellog, 285—164, .5754. 

.lohnson, A. R., Lewiston, 300—264, .8800; Johnson, 
C. M.. Wallace, 300—192, .6400; Jones, O. M., Boise, 
300—263, .8766; Jones, C. E., Twin Falls, 150—135, 
.9000. 

Kavanaugh, G. K., Lewiston, 90 — 57, .6338. 

Leigh, C. A.. Twin Falls, 300—245, .8166; Lemp, 
H., Boise, 200—176, .8800. 

Magel, Glenn, Twin Falls, 300—228, .7680; Martin. 
Ray, Boise, 300—263. .8766; Maxwell, J. M., Twin 
Falls, 150—128, .8533; McCracken, N. R.. Twin Falls. 
300—266, .8866: Miller, M. I.. Filer, 300—257, .8566; 
Miller, Wm., Filer, 300—241, .8033; Moberly, E. H., 
Boise, 200—166, .8300; Moore, F. C, Wallace, 300— 
265. .8833; Morse, R. C, Buhl, 150—121, .8066; Mull, 
C, Twin Falls, 300—229. .8633. 

Oliver. C, Buhl, 300—257, .8566. 

Porter, Fred, Kellogg. 300—227. .7566. 

Reason, W. A., Boise, 440—336, .7636; Roland, R. 
P., Kellogg, 300—239, .7966. 

Scott, J. H., Wallace, 300—235, 7833; Sebastian, 
R., Kellogg, 300—241, 8033; Seckel, C. R., Boise, 500 
—434, 8680; Shaw. C. R., Boise, 200—164, .8166; 
Snook, F. E., Twin Falls, 300—245, .8166; Streeter, 
H. L., Boise, 300—215. .7166; Sweeley. E. M.. Twin 
Falls, 400—377, .9425. 

Thomas, R. B., Kellogg, 600—488, .8133; Thompson, 
N. O., Buhl, 150—132, .8800; Titus, F. F., Grange- 
ville, 60—47, .7833. 

Ulrich, G. W., Lewiston, 400—314, .7850. 

Venable, F. R.. Wallace. 60—29, .4833. 

Wade, J. E.. Boise. 200—178. .8900; Wade. F. D., 
Wendall. 500—473, .9460; Wallace, D. S.. Lewiston. 
450—383, .8511; Wann, J. N., Lapwal. 750— 636, .8480; 
Weaver, A. E., Boise, 500—437, .8740; Werkheiser, 
M. L., Wallace, 60—46, .7666; White, Ernest, Twin 
Falls, 300—279, .9300; Wood, W. T., Twin Falls, 300 
—274, .9133; Wright, L. T., Twin Falls. 300—249, 
.8300. 

Professional— Reed, J. A., Boise, 200—168. .8400. 

Great Records.— The "Old Reliable" Parker Gun 
has again forced itself to the front by making the 
highest official amateur record on the Pacific Coast 
for 1916. scoring over 96% on 2100 targets in the 
hands of Mr. Henr>' Pfirrmann. It will be remem- 
bered that Mr. Pfirrmann by scoring 100 straight tar- 
gets at San Jose won the Championship of his State 
and also made the brilliant score of 493 out of 500 
targets at the Vernon Gun Club in July,1916. The 
above shooting was done with a 34-inch double barrel 
Parker "Old Reliable" gun. 

During 1915 and 1916 the Parker Gun made the 
highest Official General Averages as compiled by the 
Intersttite Association, and Mr. Lester German's 
score of 647 out of 650 tai'gets is the world's record 
under Interstate rules. Mr. German always shoots 
the Parker Gun. 

The Parker 20-gauge double gun is the forerunner 
of small bores in America and has reached the place 
in the sun it so well deserves. 

QG 

Amateurs Beat Pros. — Denver, Col. — Only recently 
trapshooters of Denver proved that they were wide- 
awake, as usual, when they made an interesting test 
in the shape of a 50-target contest between five of 
Denver's best amateur shots and five of Denver's pro- 
fessionals. This resulted in a victory for the ama- 
teurs by a score of 242 to 229 out of a possible 250. 

The greatest bunch of old-time shooters, as well 
as spectators, witnessed the contest, notwithstand- 
ing the chilly atmosphere. After a practice score, 
or "warm up" of 25 targets, interest centered on the 
coming contest owing to the rivalry between the two 
teams. 

Ambrose E. McKenzie, father of trapshooting in 
the Rocky Mountain States, and Nelson Franklin, for 
years president of the Rocky Mountain Interstate 
Sportsmen's Association, were selected to referee the 
contest, and the big match was on. 

The amateurs started to gain from the very begin- 
ning, and while the match was a fine exhibition, the 
professionals never had a chance. W. R. Thomas Jr., 
for the amateurs, and George Burt, for the profes- 
sionals, were the only two to break 50 straight, while 
R. A. King, the Delta wizard, who has just been de- 
clared fourth high amateur in the United States, with 
an average of 96 per cent for the year's shooting, 
broke 49 out of 50. 

The amateurs were immediately challenged for a 
return match, and same will be decided during the 
stock show, perhaps the Sunday before. 

The fact that a man is a professional in the trap- 
shooting game does not indicate that he Is a better 
shot than an amateur. This was forcibly demon- 
strated here. 



TRAPSHOOTING FIXTURES. 



August 20. 21. 22, 23. 24, 1917— Chicago, Ills.— The 
Interstate Association's Eighteenth Grand Amer- 
ican Trapshooting Tournament, under the aus- 
pices of the South Shore Country Club Gun Club; 
$4,000 added money. Winner of first place in the 
Grand American Handicap guaranteed $500 and a 
trophy; winner of second place guaranteed $400 
and a trophy; winner of third place guaranteed 
$300 and a trophy; winner of fourth place guaran- 
teed $200 and a trophy, and the winner of fifth 
place guaranteed $100 and a trophy. Numerous 
othei- trophies will also be awarded. Elmer E. 
Shaner. Manager, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

May 28. 29, 30, 1917— San Jose, Cal.— The Interstate 
Association's Twelfth Pacific Coast Trapshooting 
Tournament, under the auspices of the San Jose 
Gun Club; $1300 added money. Winner of first 
$75 and a trophy, and the winner of third place 
place in the Pacific Coast Handicap guaranteed 
$100 and a trophy; winner of second place guar- 
anteed $75 and a trophy, and the winner of third 
place guaranteed $50 and a trophy. Several other 
trophies will also be awarded. Elmer E. Shaner. 
Manager. Pittsburgh. Pennsylvania. 

% 

Improving Portland Traps. — Sixteen hundred dol- 
lars additional will be expended in improving and 
beautifying the Vverding Park grounds of the Port- 
land Gun Club at Jenne station. Acting President 
H. A. Pollock announced that contracts were let call- 
ing for the expenditure of this amount in carrying 
out the details of improvements planned by the di- 
rectors. 

The work will be started as soon as weather con- 
ditions permit and when completed will rank the 
Everding Park traps second to none in the United 
States. The club grounds ar now recognized among 
the best in the country, having been greatly improved 
last year. 

Cement shooting stands will be installed at each 
of the four traps and they will be connected with 
each other by cement walks. A wide cement walk 
will lead from the clubrooms to trap No. 3. which is 
situated directly in front of the building. Crushed 
gravel will be placed between the shooting stands 
and a promenade six feet wide will be put in between 
the clubhouse and the shooting stands. The prome- 
nade will be crushed gravel and will extend from one 
end of the grounds to the other. Permanent benches 
for the squads will also be erected. 

The concrete traphouses, the finest in the country, 
will be cut down a little and concrete tops will be 
put on them. The ground in front of the shooting 
stands will be leveled and planted in grass. Flower 
beds will be placed between each shooting stand, 
which will make the grounds as pretty as some of. 
the most exclusive clubs in the country. 

Five hundred dollars is being spent in the construc- 
tion of a well. The wooded section in back of the 
clubhouse, through which Johnson creek winds, will 
be converted into a picnic grounds. 

The officers of the club are putting forth every 
effort to have this work completed before the big 
northwest tournament , scheduled t obe staged during 
the Rose Festival. 

QC 

Seattle Association. — A good attendance with excel- 
lent weather made this shoot one of the most enjoy- 
able o fthe winter season, on January 21st. 

L. H. Reid, professional, furnished the high score 
in both the fifty and one hundred target races. He 
broke forty-nine and ninety-seven, respectively. The 
high amateur score was divided between Deskin 
Reid, C. W. Bandy and L. S. Barnes, each knocking 
out forty-seven. Bandy made an exceptionally good 
showing, this being the first time that he has topped 
the list, resulting through the consistency in shooting 
by one who might be termed a new shooter. Second 
amateur position was taken by Hi Follerich with a 
score of forty-six. 

In the hundred bird program, the high scores were 
between C. E. McKelvey and Hi Follerich for first, 
with ninety-four each, and L. S. Barnes for second 
place with a ninety-three to his credit. 

P. G. Schwager of Dundern. Saskatchewan, Canada, 
and H. J. Trimmer, formerly of Victoria, B. C, were 
visiting shooters with the club. The scores: — 

At50 targets— L. H. Reid* 49, Deskin Reid 47, C. W. 
Bandy 47, L. S. Barnes 47, Hi Follerich 46, P. G. 
Schwager 46, J. H. Hopkins 45. Dr. Kerr 45. C. E. 
McKelvey 44, Ralph Kinzer 43, D. Rhodes* 43, Ike 
Fisher* 43, G. A. Conklin 42. H. E. Gleason 42, C. L. 
Templeton 41, Alvin Schwager 40, W. B. Taft 39, 
J. H. Davis 30. C. F. Reinhard 28, H. J. Trimmer 28. 

At 100 targets— L. H. Reid* 97, C. E. McKelvey 
94. Hi Follerich 94, L. S. Barnes 93, Deskin Reid 90. 
J. H. Hopkins 89, Ike Fisher* 88. D. Rhodes* 88, 
P. G. Schwager 86, G. A. Conklin 85. A. Schwager 
84, Ralph Kinzer 83. C. L. Templeton 83, H. E. Glea- 
son 80. W. B. Taft 79, J. H. Davis 60, Dr. Hill 41, 
J. P. Houston 12. Yours, E. A. FRY. 

ae 

Three hundred and twenty-one thousand eight hun- 
dred and twenty-three persons have visited the Ca- 
nadian National Park at Banff. It is a great place 
for tourists. 

* * * 

There wasn't a shooting accident during the recent 
hunting season in New Jersey. 



10 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1917 



» • 

j Sportsmen's Row 1 

jj*^-^-,^^^-.-,-.-...,.^.....-....-......,... ...g 

Nine registered tournaments were given in Cali- 
fornia last year as against eight in 1915. Indications 
point to many more this year with the events per- 
mitted on Sunday. The Golden Gate, Alameda Elks, 
Vernon and Los Angeles clubs have already applied 
for dates. 

* * * 

Bear Valley sportsmen are insisting upon an ex- 
tension of the law prohibiting power-boat shooting 
entirely, as the "in motion" feature of the present 
law was abused. 

* * * 

George Harris of Aliso Canyon, below Santa Ana, 
shot a big mountain lion 6 ft. 2 in. long, weighing 
eighty-five pounds, recently, it having raided his 
piggery once too often. 

* * * 

The Interstate Association will give $500 to the 
Westy Hogans shoot beginning in 1917 — the same as 
they give to the subsidiary' handicaps. 

* * * 

Portland, Ore., is the only city in the United States 
that has a trophy competition in which only 20-gauge 
guns are allowed. 

* * * 

Larry Gardner, third baseman of the Boston Amer- 
icans, has rigged up a hand trap on the fender of his 
automobile, and he gets a lot of sport out of the 
"sport alluring" by trying to break the clay birds 
while the car is in motion. 

* * m 

There is a new trapshooter in Portland, Ore. He 
is .Tames Everding Strowger. He weighed eight and 
one-half pounds when he arrived on December 3rd. 
His father was president of the Portland Gun Club, 
and he is named after H. R. Everding, the former 
president of the club. 

* « * 

Pennsylvania maintains 18 game preserves, which 
cover an area of 100 square miles. 

* * * 

Connecticut sportsmen are demanding a closed 
season for deer. 

* * * 

Ten thousand deer were killed in Maine during the 
past season. Nine thousand more were killed in 
California and 261 in New Jersey. In the latter 
State the season is only four days. 

* ♦ * 

Two hundred and fifty bear were killed in Penn- 
sylvania during the season just closed, which is a 
greater number than were killed in many of the 
Western States. Eighteen bear were killed in Maine. 
« « * 

California paid out $60,000 in bounties for moun- 
tain lions at $20 each during 1916. Statistics show 
that a mountain lion will kill 50 deer a year. 

Five game preserves and 67 bird reservations are 
maintained by the Biological Survey of the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

Statistics upon casualties in hunting this last year 
in California compiled by the Fish and Game Com- 
mission indicate eight fatalities and nine injuries. 
Carelessness killed seven of them. Automobiles 
equal that record every week, but no one worries 
much about the ever-present dangers of motoring. 
Based upon the number who follow it, hunting would 
seem to be one of the safest of diversions, about as 
dangerous as crossing the street. 

* * * 

United Slates and Great Britain have signed a 
treaty for ihe mutual border protection of migratory 
birds. One of these days Uncle Sam will have a like 
treaty with Mexico. 

* He m 

Word comes from Independence that the big Mount 
Whitney hatchery is officially turned over to the fish 
and game commission by the state department of 
engineering, which built it. Completed in every de- 
tail to the last trough, it is said to be ready for the 
eyed eggs from Naylor district up above. It is the 
biggest, best, most modem trout propagation plant 
in the world, and the handsomest to look upon, as 
well as certain to outlast any other hatchery now 
above ground. Watchmen have been put in charge 
and an inventory taken of the property as it now 
stands . Every man who has seen it came back en- 
thusiastic and declares it the biggest improvement 
that could have been made in flsh and game for the 
south. 

* ♦ * 

John T. Connolly went up to Knights Landing and 
got out In the tules. He found that most of the large 
birds had departed for other parts but he had a good 
shoot on teal and sprig. 

* * * 

J. Walter Scott, the field trials enthusiast and 
president of the Los Banos Gun Club, closed the 
season appropriately. There were five or six in his 
party and there were as many limits. Sir J. Walter 
says that the shooting at Los Banos this year was 
the best he has ever experienced. 

* * * 

W. J. Terry, the well-known trap shooter of the 
Golden Gate Gun Club, bagged what is said to be the 



biggest goose of the season at the Teal Club near 
Willows on Sunday. It weighed 21 V4 pounds and 
was some monster. In addition he got the limit on 
mallaids and English snipe. It was certainly a great 
day for shooting. 

* * * 

Bill Price and George Thomas got the limit, ac- 
cording to the way they figure it. Up at Sobrante 
on Sunday they shot 2 birds in the morning and in 
the afternoon. Adding to the 2, it makes 20 — just 
the limit. 

* * * 

The National Championship has been postponed 
until February 5th, to be held the week following 
the Southwestern and Derby Championship trials at 
Vinita, Okla. The stake was scheduled to begin at 
Grand Junction, Tenn., on Monday, January 15th, 
but the elements conspired and decreed otherwise. 

* * * 

In the state of Now Jersey a foreign-bom, unnat- 
uralized person is prohibited from hunting or own- 
ing a shotgun or rifle unless he is the owner of real 
estate to the value of $2000 above all incumbrances. 

Hawk Flies 3700 Miles.— Red Lodge (Mont.).— A 
larse hawk, caught by Eddie Hotchkiss in his oat 
field August 19, was killed October 29 on Bogota 
plain, nine miles north of Bogota, capital of the 
South American Republic of Colombia. When Hotch- 
kiss caught the birds he conceived the idea of at- 
taching to it a bottle, containing his name and ad- 
dress ,and releasing it. This he did, and has just 
received a letter dated November 4, from Luis Fe- 
lipe Rulda of Colombia, in which he wrote of killing 
the hawk and findmg the bottle tied to the bird's 
neck. In an air line, Bogota is about 3700 miles 
from Red Lodge. 

Rabbit Bounties Large — Lakevlew, Ore. — Dan God- 
sil, who has charge of the counting of the scalps that 
are brought to the courthouse for payment, says that 
the past few days has seen only a few rabbit scalps 
brought in. However, the previous several weeks 
since the first of the year saw him almost swamped 
with them. He states that up to the present time 
bounties have been paid on about 10,000 rabbits. 
This means about $500 worth of warrants issued in 
the first three weeks that the bounty law has been in 
effect. 

However, it is impossible to cash the warrants at 
the present time as there is no money in the rabbit 
bounty fund to pay them and there will not be until 
the taxes come due on the fifth of April next. Rumors 
have been going around Lakeview in the past few 
days that some of the large timber holders are going 
to refuse to pay that portion of the tax, claiming 
that it is in direct violation of the six per cent tax 
limitation law. 

% 

Has Doe Skin; Fined. — Jail sentence befell a Mex- 
ican arrested by Deputy Fish and Game Commission- 
er Henry J. Abels in Santa Barbara county for hav- 
ing in his possession the hide of a doe, and Joe So- 
leara was given 30 days wherein to pay a $25 fine 
for having deer meat in the closed season. The 
snows have driven down deer from the heights and 
made them easy to get from the Santa Ynez valley. 

As some 275 deer were reported in that county 
as shot by hunters during September over previous 
years. Deputy Abels feels that the protection of deer 
has paid and the justices support enforcement work 
by stiff penalties. 

Los Angeles Club. — R. P. Riggs, shooting from the 
sixteen-yard line, captured the C. W. Fish cup at the 
Los Angeles Gun Club on Sunday, from forty other 
contestants. Seth Hart and A. Pachmayr tied for 
second place. A cool wind blew over the traps at the 
Los Angeles Club and this accounts for the only fair 
scores which were made. The complete scores of 
the day's shoot are as follows: 

Ed Mitchell 93, R. P. Riggs 91, Seth Hart 90, A. 
Pachmayr 90, W. A. Hillis 87, H. D. Blanchard 86, 
L. R. Melius 86, C. W. Fish 84, E. K. Mohler 83, 
O. Council 83, V. A. Ros.sbach 83, N. W. Nelson 82, 
Mrs. Pfirrmann 82, C. S. White 82, W. A. Joslyn 81, 
J .H. Bishop Jr. 80, H. Pfirrmann 80, G. Holohan 79, 
H. E. Sargent 78, B. H. Carnahan 77, Wm. Kennedy 
76, George Oliver 72, H. Hickban 59, W. L. Cooper 
52x75, A. J. Petersen 46x75, G. Pulley 44x50, L. M. 
Packard 43x50, O. L. Grimsley 43x50, F. H. Teeple 
42x50, M. D. Town 39x50, H. Bower 36x60, R. Cheno- 
with 30x50, W. Koemer 24x50, S. Mclnnis 19x50, Ben 
Meyer 14x50, Mrs. C. E. Groat 21x25, C. E. Groat 
19x25, S. F Bell 19x25, H. A. Richey 14x25, C. A. 
Scroggs 16x20, Bordean 10x15. 

ac 

WHAT SIZED FISH, MOST FUN? 

One-Pounders Better Than Giants is the Opinion of 
Eastern Anglers. 

Much has recently been printed in the papers re- 
garding brook trout of extremely large size having 
been taken with the fly, some of which weighed ten 
pounds, and in fairness I do not believe that such 
an incident has ever occurred in American waters. 

Trout of ten pounds in weight are found only in 
the Rangeley lakes of Maine, and while it may be 
true that these monster trout are physically landed 
after being hooked with artificial flies, yet the big 
fish never come the the surface to seize the fly, as do 
the smaller trout, which often jnake such a rush in 
attacking the insect as to shoot above the surface of 



the water, quite as if their entire future happiness 
depended upon securing that particular fly. 

To get the big fish a light shot is attached to the 
fly, which is sunk far beneath the surface and agi- 
tated before the fish and is thus taken, and this is 
bait fishing and nothing else. 

The salmon always steals upward slowly and de- 
liberately, quietly sucks the fly into his mouth and 
gradually sinks to the bottom in a leisurely manner, 
whil<> the big trout take the fly only when it is sunk 
beneath the surface of the water to some distance, 
and 'hen the fly becomes ordinary bait. 

And when hooked the big fish do not display the 
agility or skirmishing qualities of the smaller speci- 
mens, but of course they fight hard because of their 
weight and correspondingly great muscular devel- 
opment. 

It has been repeatedly asserted that brook trout of 
fourteen pounds or more have been taken from the 
Nepjgon River, and that very large trout are found 
there cannot be denied; but I do not believe they 
rath«r a species of fario, and of course true trout. 

If I might be able to get one of them into my 
han<ls for two jniuutes I could reach a definite conclu- 
sion because, while I don't know much I am able to 
distinguish a salmon from a charr unerringly. 

I bave a mounted brook trout which weighed over 
nin»- pounds and which put up a long and game 
fight, but it was just a constant and heavy pull and 
sulk, giving and taking line until the flsh was ex- 
hausted and netted. 

There is more solid fun and excitement in taking 
the dashing and vigorous one-pounders with light 
tack'e than can ever be enjoyed in landing the giants 
of the species, but you have got to capture a colossus 
of the species it you want to see your name and pic- 
ture printed in the newspapers. 

A« an object of intrinsic beauty there is no fish in 
our waters that is even remotely worthy of being 
compared to the brook trout. It is gorgeousness ex- 
emplified, a thing of rare beauty and an endless de- 
light to the eye. 

In outline it is grace personified, not an ideal curve 
absent, dazzling in its coat of rose and velvet, its 
countless vermillion spots and aureole of blue digni- 
fying it with a crown of royalty, the veritable mon- 
arch of American waters. 

When Marc Antonio discovered his friend Raphael 
engaged upon the Sistine picture, he exclaimed: 
"Cospetto! Another Madonna?" 

Raphael gravely replied: "Amico mia, were all 
artists to paint her portrait forever they could not 
exhaust her beauty." 

The exclamation applies with full cogency to the 
valorous brook trout, than which God never created 
a more beautiful object. 

There is one feature associated with trout fishing 
not met in the pursuit of any other fish, the stately 
quiet and peace and freedom from danger and the 
sooihing effect of the murmuring ripples of the cease- 
less brook. 

"".epeatedly have I stretched myself upon the 
ground in the shade of a bunch of bushes beside a 
mountain brook and enjoyed a refreshing sleep, and 
when I awoke the $17 and my watch were still se- 
cure in my pockets, and I think it would be risky to 
indulge in this experiment anywhere in New York 
and expect to retain my property. 

From this it is fair to assume that the beasts of 
Now York are a greater menace to man than the 
beasts of the forests, and indeed no wild beast will 
ever attack a human being in the wildemess unless 
it Is assailed and its safety threatened. Even the 
villainous rattlesnake will make every effort to es- 
cape and get away from a man as fast and as far 
as possible, and inflicts its perilous stab only when 
it finds danger to itself impending. It may safely 
b<t asserted that mankind's greatest enemy is man, 
and the farther away one gets from his race the more 
secure is he from harm. 

The brook trout is beset with more enemies by 
far than the anglers who endeavor to catch them; 
indeed the entire existence of the fish appears to be 
a constant and vigilant effort t oavoid its relentless 
(1«^stroyers. 

Among such enemies are water snakes, cranes, 
kingfishers and snapping turtles, and the vast amount 
of trout these destroy is beyond computation. Even 
the trout themselves destroy and eat each other con- 
stantly, the larger seeming to be very fond of the 
.smaller flsh as a regular diet, and it must be con- 
fessed they know a good thing when they see it. 

The water .snake , however, quite often falls victim 
to the flsh, thus pleasantly reversing conditions, and 
I have caught trout with one or two small snakes in 
the stomach. 

The crane will stand upon one of his long legs, 
usually at the foot of a pool, as rigid and immovable 
as a rock, and when a trout leisurely swims by the 
long bills makes an instantaneous dive and never 
fails to bring up a fine trout, when it flies away to 
quietly enjoy its delicious morsel. 

The bulky snapping turtle is wonderfully quick, 
wily and active when hunting a stream, and no trout 
for which it darts ever escapes. 

Nothing that lives is so tenacious of life as the 
snapping turtle. With the head severed from the 
body it will live for days, and a headless turtle mov- 
ing about is a most repulsive sight, while the severed 
head will snap fiercely for several days, as if attack- 
ing a foe.— [Kit Clarke, N. Y . 



Saturday, Februay 3, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



11 



CLOSED SEASONS FOR WASHINGTON. 



Old Hunter Writes, Advocating Protection For the 
Upland Birds. 



Tacoiua, Wash. — Ira Robinson of Bellingham be- 
lieves that recommendations made to the legislature 
by count ygame commissioners are wrong and in an 
open letter to the game and fish committee he sets 
forth his views on the matter. He believes that a 
closed season of one or two years should be declared 
for upland birds to replenish flocks. A closed sea- 
son for part of each year is not sufficient, in his esti- 
mation, to preserve bird life. Robinson takes a slap 
at county game commissioners and charges that 
some of thorn at least are not equal to their jobs. He 
thinks the state should protect deer also, and that 
game fish should be kept from going to sea. His let- 
ter is as follows: 

"Considerable interest being taken in the protec- 
tion of same this year, amendments to our present 
game code will no doubt be enacted. 

"Having been a resident of the state of Washing- 
ton for the last 44 years, and following the pleasures 
of outdoor life for 30 years or more, and during that 
time being a close observer of our game and fish, 
a few suggestions along that line may be of some 
benefit to your honorable committee. 

"We remember that a few weeks back the county 
game commissioners of the state met at Tacoma and 
have recommended several amendments to our game 
laws. One is, they recommend that the game com- 
missioners be given the power to regulate the open 
and closed seasons in their respective counties. In 
other words, having the making of game laws. In 
my judgment this is entirely wrong. 

"I base my reasons for that on the fact that we do 
not always have game commissioners who are quali- 
fied to hold their positions. 

"Our present way of appointing county game com- 
missioners, I believe, is wrong. While it is right 
that the county game commissioners should be rec- 
ommended by the board of county commissioners, 
the law should be so amended as to give the 
county commissioners who are in power that privi- 
lege. We also remember that by a decision of the 
supreme court not long ago, the county commission- 
ers are compelled to audit all game bills padded by 
the game commissioners without the right to reject 
any of them. This part of the game laws should 
receive your due consideration and you should so 
amend, giving the county commissioners the right 
to handle the game funds as they do all other county 
funds . It is recommended that a law be enacted hold- 
ing the owner of dogs liable for what damage their 
dogs may do. I believe this a good law, for from 
personal knowledge I know dogs kill many of our 
game birds durinf the closed season. 

"Another most important amendment recommend- 
ed by the game commissioners is in regard to the 
open and closed se.isons for upland birds. It seems 
to be their desire to go right on killing. We must 
admit that some of our game commissioners are city 
bred and brought up. Some are late arrivals in the 
state and do not fully realize that our game is being 
gradually exterminated. Changing the open and 
closed seasons will not prolong the life of our game 
many years more. What we need is a closed season 
for one or two years, and our coveys will increase in 
number. 

"Restrictive measures alone will not preserve our 
game. A certain per cent of each county's game fund 
should be set aside for propagation purposes or pur- 
chasing game birds and distributing the same thru- 
out the country. 

"Considerable stress is being put upon the state 
game farm at Walla Walla to furnish all game birds 
necessary. Let us notice for a moment as to how 
these birds are liberated. They are sent out some 
time during the summer months along with the 
mother bird who broods and cares for them until 
they become nearly grown, when they wander away. 
We must consider that these b'rds are reared in 
captivity and become quite tame, and it is an even 
bet that not one of these birds live through the hunt- 
ing season. 

"I suggest that the law be so amended that all 
birds be liberated at the end of hunting seasons in- 
stead of just before. By so doing these birds will 
nest the following spring and greatly increase our 
game birds. 

"Taking the history of Whatcom, my home county: 
In our pioneer days, or say, 25 years back, our 
streams, lakes and marshes were alive with water- 
fowl, but with the advancement of agriculture their 
resting and feeding places have been destroyed, and 
as they .are strictly a migratory bird, no restrictions 
other than our federal migratory law will increase 
their numbers here. A few years back native pheas- 
ants were plentiful, but as they are a woodland bird 
and our forests are being rapidly cleared up, they 
are doomed to be exterminated. 

"We have a few Hungarian pheasants, but they 
are protected until 1920, so we practically have no 
other upland bird than the Chinese pheasant, which 
we must look to for our future game. 

"In the pioneer days deer roamed our forests in 
great numbers. Today they are almost extinct and 
the killing of bucks only (as recommended by the 
.game commissioners) will not preserve the life of 
that noble animal. A closed season should be placed 
upon them, especially in some of our counties. As to 
vgame fish — we find from the recoids of our game offi- 



cers that the Lake Whatcom trout hatchery (rocoR- 
nized as the best game fish hatchery in the state) 
has spent 'leveral thousand dollars in the last five 
or six years for operation and maintenance; has also 
liberated several million game fish, with the result 
that game fish are no more plentiful today than they 
were when the above named hatchery was put into 
operation. 

"The pioneers, or those of us who have studied 
and ob.'^ervpd the habits of the fish, know that game 
fish, as well as food fish, are of migratory nature. It 
is their habit to remain on or near their spawning 
grounds for about a year, until they become from 
three and a half to five inches long. Then they head 
for the open sea, and unless they are properly se- 
cured by screen or otherwise, it is an absolute waste 
of game funds to operate a game fish hatchery." 

SB 

Seattle Fly-Casting. — With a list of new officers at 
its head the Seattle Fly and Bait Casting Club is 
starting another year which promises to be a record- 
breaker in membership and good work in the propa- 
gation, preservation and other work on the fish and 
game question. 

At a recent business meeting of the club R. E. 
Lyitaker was elected president, R. S. Hayes vice- 
president and L. F. Lane, secretary-treasurer for the 
ensuing year. 

It was with pride that P. Pitt Shaw, the retiring 
president, turned over the head of what has become 
the largest sportsmen's organization in Seattle. Mr. 
Shaw and the other retiring officers were given a 
vote of thanks for their good work during the past 
year. 

Trustees elected for 1917 were Messrs. Houser, 
Chase, Bunker, Thomas and De Long. 

R. S. Hayes was also elected as captain and will 
itiimediately start action toward the fly and bait 
casting tournament work for the coming season. 
Hayes has planned at least one large Northwest tour- 
nament and several inter-city affairs, and intends to 
place the Seattle club on a par with the tournament 
work carried on by other cities. 

Mr. Smart as judge and Messrs. Flammont and 
Schaefer as tellers were the first appointments to 
be made by the new president. 

The club, working together with other sportsmen's 
organizations of the country, is making a special ef- 
fort to get a good, reliable man in the office of county 
game warden . 

Vernon Club. — Bob Bole captured the gold bar 
prize at the Vernon Gun Club Sunday by defeating 
Stanton Bruner and W. Reid in a twenty-five bird 
shoot-off. Bole smashed 24x25 in the shoot-off, while 
the other two participants broke only 23x25. In the 
first event the shooters tied with 46x50 smashes. 
The scores: 







Hdcp. 


Prize. 


Prac. 


H. Hoyt 




16 


34 


39 


0. A. Evans 




18 


42 


47 


A .W. Bruner 




16 


47 


46 


Willia mPugh 




18 


43 


44 


Betz 




16 


38 


41 


Long 




16 


41 


41 


Bob Boie 




17 


46 


47 


S. A. Bruner 




20 


46 


49 


Van Nest 




16 


35 




Reid 




16 


46 


44 


Geoff) I 




16 


34 




Mrs. Groat 




18 




18 


H. Groat 




16 




20 


J. L. Smith 




16 


32 




Hanlon 




16 




17 






16 




21 


A. Betz 




16 




12 


William Braner 




16 




23 












Los Angeles Gun Club 


Plans. 


—Los Angeles, 


Cal.- 


During the past year the Los Angeles Gun Club had 


the largest weekly attendance of any gun club 


in the 


United States. Greater 


enthusiasiTi is 


being 


shown 



by the members so far this year, although it is early 
in the year. From 4,000 to 7,000 targets were thrown 
weekly during the year of 1916. 

Somewhere between Los Angeles and the east are 
120.000 targets which make up the regular shipment 
the L. A. club receives every three months during 
the shooting season. 

The I.,os Angeles Gun Club has made a bid for the 
big 1917 shooting tournament, which will be held 
this sumiTier. The present indications are that Los 
Angeles has never had a big shooting event. Al- 
though it has one of the largest trapshooting clubs 
in the state it has never been awarded the big 
shooting event. 

Heine Pfirrmann and Fred Teeples are in receipt 
of more than half a hundred letters from prominent 
trapshoolers throughout the coast who are in favor 
of the big California-Nevada Gun Club this year. The 
two states always hold their shoots together. 

The dates of May 21-22-23 have been submitted to 
the association by the club. If the shoot is warded 
to the Los Angeles Gun Club a special car will be 
chartered to carry the local shooters to the Pacific 
Coast Handicap shoot, which will be held at San 
Jose, May 27, 28, 29 and 30. The head of the San 
Jo.se club, Mr. Ford, has written to the local officials 
and is doing everything in his power to land the big 
state shoot for the Los Angeles Club. 



TRAPSHOOTING AMATEUR IS DEFINED. 



Any One Who Receives Expenses, Free Shells or 
Ammunition, or Anything Else. 



The National Associations of Golf and Tennis have 
for years been trying to define an amateur — and have 
not met with any success because every move toward 
the tightening of the amateur clause has hit some 
popular player who earns his daily bread through 
his connection with some sporting goods house. 

The .\niatour Athletic Union defines an amateur 
dearly— and then tries to duck from under. The 
definition is lived up to in some sections and in more 
others it is not. Influence has a great deal to do 
with wiiether an athlete remains an amateur or is 
declared a professional. 1 speak from experience — 
for I know. 

It would pay some of the organizations that are 
trying to define amateurism to delve into the trap- 
shooting rules and purloin a few pages from the 
books of tne Intfrstate Association for the Encour- 
agement of Trapshooting. Here is an association 
that handles in the neighborhood of a half-million 
trapshooters annually without any registration and 
has less friction and complaint than organizations 
dealing with a half-dozen persons. 

The Interstate Association makes a ruling on ama- 
teurs and professionals and lives up to it . Some 
years ago it wasn't very sever. It has been tighten- 
ed each year, and there have always been some peo- 
ple who were able to beat the rules and remain in 
classes that they were not entitled to be in. These 
things are known and as time wore on the Interstate 
Association corrected the faults. 

Now they have defined the amateur and profes- 
sional so clearly that it will be next to impossible 
for any person to beat the rules without dishonor. 
Everything is accomplished on the honor system in 
trapshooting — and trapshooters are the finest sports- 
men in the world. 

Here is the Interstate Association's definition of 
the Amateur and Professional: 

"Any shooter, not dependent upon his skill as a 
trapshot as a means of livelihood, either directly or 
indirectly, or in part or whole, including employees 
of manufacturers of, or dealers in, firearms, ammu- 
nition, powder, traps, targets and other trapshooting 
accessories, and who does not receive any compensa- 
tion or concession, monetary or otherwise, or allow- 
ance for expenses or trapshooting supplies from such 
manufacturers o rdealers, shall be classed as an am- 
ateur. 

"Any shooter, including emplojees of manufactur- 
ers of, or dealers in, firearms, ammunition, powder, 
targets, traps and other shooting accesories, who re- 
ceives his salary or any portion of his salary, or any 
expenses of any kind tor use in trapshooting, or 
rebate on ihe market price of such articles, as com- 
pensation for the promotion of the sale or advertise- 
ment of any such products handled by such manufac- 
truers, shall be classed as a professional." 

In other words, the amateur shooter is the one who 
pulverizes the clay birds because he likes the sport 
and shoots for sport only. 

The fellow who receives any portion of his expen- 
ses in any capacity, or who purchases shells, guns, 
etc.. less than standard figures because he has some 
ability as a shot, or the hardware clerk who gets his 
ammunition free, etc., will be found in the profes- 
sional class this year. The rule is drastic— but it is 
right — and the Interstate Association didn't mince 
matters in adopting it. And if it isn't strong enough, 
they will put in a few more screws and tighten it. — 
Peter P. Carney, Phila., Pa. 

Trapshooting Comparisons. — Back in the early 80's 
when America's sportsmen began to demand a 
between-season outlet for their gunning enthusiasm, 
some bright \ankee genius conceived the idea of the 
glass ball as a fitting target to try the prowess of the 
marksman, when the object was projected at un- 
known angles from a mechanical contrivance known 
as a trap. 

The name of Bogardus, in connection with glass 
ball shooting, is not only historical, but still alive 
and dominant in the reminiscences of old-timers, a 
goodly percentage of whom still follow the sport of 
trapshooting. 

Tlie trapshooting of today, however, differs ma- 
terially from that sport of long ago; the traps are 
more scientifically constructed, the target, instead of 
being globular in form, is saucer-shaped and not 
only covers its fifty-yard flight with the speed of an 
arrow but rotates as well. 

It has become customary for writers to refer to 
the clay pigeon as "the inanimate target"; so long 
as they remain packed in barrels or stacked in the 
trap house this is quite proper. On the other hand, 
were you to ask any one of the 500,000 trapshooters 
in the country for his personal opinion he would un- 
hesitatingly say that immediately following the re- 
lease of the trap, it becomes just about as animated 
as a devilish ingenuity could conceive. — [By Geo. 
Peck. 

00 

Wyoming appropriated $60,000 in 1916 to be paid 
for the hides of coyotes at $1.50 each. The sum was 
not enough. Thousands of coyotes were killed which 
the trappers could not collect for. 



12 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1917 



I Stock and Farm Department | 

HISESIglSglHBiaSSilllljliiaSlSSSJSSH 

It is estimated that there are 130,000 acres of 
prunes and apricots in California. 

* * 

The cheese factory at Caruthers paid out $6,800 for 
butter fat during the month of December. The price 
paid producers for the butter fat was 42% cents. 

* * * 

It is not economy to feed all cows the same amount 
of grain. They should be fed in accordance with 
their production. A heavy grain ration given a light 
milking cow falters her but does not increase her 
milk beyond her ordinary limit. 

* * * 

A Los Angeles colony consisting of thirty-six fam- 
ilies will settle on land purchased at Oak Flat, near 
Dunlap, Cal., June 1. The land brought $100 per 
acre. The land will be improved with apple orchards. 
All of the families intend to erect dwellings and re- 
side on the premises. The land is considered among 
the best in the state for the culture of apples, and ii 
is understood there is plenty of capital behind the 
colony to make all needed improvements. 

* * * 

High prices for potatoes on the Chicago market 
have attracted big shipments from England to com- 
pete with the American-grown product, according to 
a statement made public by Sol Westerfield, former 
president of the National Retail Grocers' Associa- 
tion. "It seems impossible that war-stricken England 
can send potatoes to Chicago to compete with the 
product grown in Illinois, Wisconsin and other west- 
ern states, but I have seen the bills of lading." Mr. 
Westerfield says. Potatoes are selling at $2.25 a 
bushel. 

* * * 

Approximately 50,000 hogs were shipped from Co- 
lusa county during the year 1916. At a conservative 
figure the amount of money returned to Colusa 
county was approximately $750,000. The principal 
shippers were Johnsen & Richter, who shipped more 
than 10,000 hogs during the year, and Comfort & 
Hougland, who shipped about the same number. Thai 
this year will see a large increase in the shipments 
is the belief of the shippers. It is expected that more 
than $1,000,000 in hogs alone will be shipped in 1917. 
Ideal climatic conditions, combined with excellent 
feeding grounds and water transportation, make it 
possible for Colusa county producers to ship their 
hogs at a minimum cost and at a comparatively small 
cost for production. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Dairymen receive $5,529. 

Two hundred and fifty shareholders in the Dairy- 
men's Co-Operative Creamery Association of Tulare 
attended the annual meeting of the association last 
week. The report of the maneger showed that the 
creamery had a capacity business in 1916. The sales 
totaled $638,630.19, of which amount $5,529.58 was 
paid dairymen for 5,178,918 pounds of cream deliv- 
ered during the year. The butter churned during 
the year totaled 2,120,962 pounds, and the average 
make per day was 5,180 pounds. The average price 
per pound paid for butter fat was 24.65 cents. 
•!• ♦ •!> 

Volumne 34 of the Holstein-Friesian Herd Book is 
the last volume issued by the Holstein-Friesian As- 
sociation of America, Brattleboro, Vt. It contains 
the entries from May 1, 1915 to Jan. 15, 1916, instead 
of those for the entire fiscal year as formerly, the 
business having so increased as to make the issuing 
of one volume a year impracticable . The total num- 
ber of entries in the volume is 45,538, of which 
16,659 are bulls and 28,879 cows. 

* * * 

Tietje Quenn de Kol, the Holstein-Friesian cow 
which recently broke the record for butter making 
in giving 542.7 pounds of milk in seven days for 
542.7 pounds of butter was sold recently for $5,000 
to a creamery company. The previous record has 
been 32 pounds of butter. The vow is nine years 
and nine months old. 

* * * 

A dairy cow should be in good condition at time 
of calving. The amount of milk she gives when 
fresh usually shows her capacity . She should then 
be fed enough to support this milk production. A 
cow that does not have the inheritance to give more 
than 20 pounds of milk daily cannot be made to give 
40 by liberal grain feeding. However, the cow that 
starts giving 40 pounds will not continue to do so 
long unless sufficient feed is given to furnish the 
raw material for this much product. 

+ •!> ••• 

The findings of the tri-state milk commission, 
which was appointed from Maryland, Pennsylvania 
and Delaware with a view of standardizing the pro- 
duction and sale of milk, were recently made public. 
The food value of milk is exhaustively discussed and 
shows that a quart of milk is equal to eight eggs. 
With milk at nine cents a quart and eggs at 45 
cents a dozen, it is stated that the consumer pays 
33.10 times as much for the same food value, when 
buying milk and eggs. The report shows that the 
cost of production of a quart of milk now ranges 
between two and four cents, where formerly it was 
one to two cents. 



The late S. C. Lillis, whose death occurred in Oak- 
land last week, owned 140,000 acres of land, the 
major portion of which was in Fresno county. He 
was particularly interested in cattle and owned sev- 
eral thousand head of range cattle at the time of 
his death. 

* * * 

At a mass meeting at Fresno, last week, the 
$9,000,000 Pine Flat reservoir project was explained 
to a large number of farmers. More than 1,000,000 
acres of land in Fresno, Tulare and Kings counties 
will be irrij;ated if the project is successfully carried 
through. 

* * * 

Keen competition between the southern and north- 
ern citrus fruit districts has developed into the Na- 
tional Orange Show, to be conducted at San Ber- 
nardino, February 20 to 28. World honors are to 
be awarded to the best quality of fruits, and, as in 
former years, the citrus fruit growers of California 
are preparing to enter their most luscious orchard 
products. 

* ♦ ♦ 

A farm adviser is assured for Fresno county, fol- 
lowing the example of the progressive counties of 
California, the majority of which have farm advisers. 
The Chamber of Commerce of Fresno county and the 
University of California department of agriculture, by 
working hand in hand secured enough signers of 
Fresno county stockmen and farmers to assure the 
support of a capable man. 



California Swine Breeders Meet. 

One of the most enthusiastic meetings of live stock 
breeders ever held in California was conducted at 
Los Angeles, January 1 Sand 19 account the Cali- 
fornia Swine Breeders' Association. 

The progressive breeders of the coast attended and 
many prominent breeders addressed the convention. 
They are a live-wire bimch and the swine business 
of the coast promises much in the future for the 
breeders, as a result of this association. 

The following resolution was adopted at the meet- 
ing: 

"Whereas, It is held by some that the remedy for 
existing marketing ills for farm products is the estab- 
lishing of state markets in the towns and cities of 
California in order to bring producer and consumer 
together, and 

"Whereas, We, the members of the California 
Swine Breeders' Association, assembled in the city 
of Los Angeles this 18th day of January, 1917, in 
state convention, feel in common with the field farm- 
ers of California that such state markets would not 
in the slightest degree solve our grave and serious 
marketing problems, and 

"Whereas, We firmly believe that the only solution 
for such swine marketing problems lies first of all in 
organizing a strong and effective swine breeders' 
Marketing association, and 

"Whereas, We believe that such producers' market- 
ing association is as much in the interest of consum- 
er as of producer, by 

(a) Raising the standards so as to ship market 
products equal to those shipped here from outside 
the state, 

(b) Minimizing the waste in cost of distribution, 

(c) Lessening the possibility of speculation anC 
thus in the interest of producer and consumer sta- 
bilizing prices; be it therefore 

"Resolved, That we heartily approve the work that 
has been done and is being done by State Market 
Director Weinstock in organizing the farm produc- 
ers of the state into effective marketing associa- 
tions; 

"Resolved, That we earnestly recommend to the 
legislature now in session that it approve such addi- 
tional amendments to the marketing law as will ena- 
ble the State Market Director, in the interest of pro- 
ducer and consumer of farm products, to broaden his 
activities and to enlarge the scope of his work so 
that the State Market Commission may be of highest 
usefulness to the great agricultural interests of Cal- 
ifornia." 

o 

Treating Wounds of Animals. 

Most wounds on farm animals will heal naturally 
without causing trouble. It is, however, good prac- 
tice to aid nature by keeping out infection and thus 
causing more rapid healing. The first twenty-four 
hours the wound is made is the most important time 
to get in good work. Normally the skin keeps out 
infection, but when it is broken the portion under- 
neath is laid open to hamiful bacteria. After about 
twenty-four hours the body sends blood and white 
corpuscles around the wound to fortify it against 
infection, but infection usually gets in while the 
wound is fresh and the body is unprepared for the 
attack. 

In treating a fresh wound, the first step is to check 
the hemorrhage if the animal is bleeding badly. This 
can be done by heat, torsion of the blood vessels, 
ligation, or pressure. One of the best ways to check 
bleeding from most wounds is to put a pack of sterile 
cotton, dusted with boric acid, over the raw surface 
and bandage it tightly. Washing with warm water 
will control a slight hemorrhage. After the bleeding 
is over the wound should be prepared for immediate 
healing. All dirt, hair, slivers of wood or foreign 
substances of any kind should be removed. Long 
hair near the wound should be clipped and parts of 
the tissue that are badly torn and hanging should be 
cut off. Then wash the wound thoroughly with a 



weak solution of mercuric bichloride or carbolic acid. 
Repeat these washings every 8 hours for the next 48 
hours, hut just dampen the wound after the first 
good washing. 

Wounds that have not been looked after at first 
and have become infected should be well painted 
with tincture of iodine. In case an animal is snagged 
the hole should be filled with iodine every 8 hours 
for four or five times'. Be sure to get the iodine to 
the bottom of the hole. A syringe comes in handy in 
this case. 

After the wounds have begun to heal they usually 
require but a small amount of attention. The follow- 
ing is a good healing lotion that can be profitably 
used once or twice a day: Pine tar 2 ounces, and 
castor oil enough to make up a pint. If there is any 
ov^:'rabundance of new tissue forming an excessive 
granulation, white lotion is good to use. It is com- 
posed of lead acetate, 1 ounce; zinc sulphate 6 
drahms, and water enough to make up a pint. 
Dampen the surface of the wound mornings and 
evenings with the above mixture. If quite a bit of 
proud flesh has already formed cauterizing should 
be resorted to . A red hot iron rubbed thoroughly 
over the wound will stop the formation of proud 
flesh. Copper sulphate, iron sulphate and zinc sul- 
phate mixed in equa Iparts will form a powder that 
will serve the same purpose as the hot iron, if the 
mixture is dusted on the wound every three or four 
days until unhealthy granulation ceases. 



Union Stock Yards at Sacramento. 

With the filing of incorporation last week of a 
$100,000 stock company, California promoters and 
capitalists have taken formal steps to establish a 
union stockyards at Sacramento. The new organiza- 
tion will be known as the Union Stockyards of West 
Sacramento. Harry Thorp will be president, with 

D. O. Lively, formerly Chief of the Department of 
Livestock, P.-P. I. E., as manager. The directors 
and organizers are J. H. Glide, Harry Thorp, Chas. 

E. Virden, H. Sam Thorp, T. S. Glide. 

Before launching the new stock concern the organ- 
izers visited the Portland yards with the result that 
they became convinced Sacramento is an ideal place 
for such an industry. They found that many of the 
cattle from this district are shipped to Portland, 
while the stock men of the state largely are depend- 
ent on buyers in handling their cattle, a situation 
that does not mean the best of prices. 

The proposed stockyards will be located on a 20- 
acre tract in West Sacramento between the Oakland, 
Ant loch and Eastern tracks and the Sacramento 
river. Fifteen acres will be used for the stock yards 
proper, while five acres will be reserved for a pack- 
ing plant which it is proposed to establish after the 
venture is in working order. 

With the completion of the incorporation of the 
stock yards the concern will be ready to issue stock, 
and it is expected will be in a position to open the 
yards in about six months. 

Following the announcement that the stockyards 
are about to be established in Sacramento, State 
Market Director Weinstock issued a statement com- 
mending the idea as a step toward the settling of 
some of the marketing problems of livestock growers 
and dairymen. With a central stock market, Wein- 
stock declared, it will be easier to organize the stock 
men and increase the business of growing meat in 
this state, which now depends on other common- 
wealths for $30,000,000 worth of meat products con- 
sumed. 

o 

PREVENTION OF ABORTION IN CATTLE. 



Veterinarians Receive Instruction Concerning Recent 
Discoveries Regarding Abortion at Short Course 
at the University Farm at Davis. 



[A System of Hygiene for Breeding Cattle Recom- 
mended to Cattle Owners by an Expert.] 

In order to make immediately available throughout 
the state recent discoveries regarding infectious 
abortion and allied diseases of cattle, the College of 
Agriculture of the University of California, in co- 
operation with the California State Veterinary Med- 
ical Association, recently held a Practitioners' Short 
Course in Veterinarj- Medicine at the University 
Farm, Davis. Seventy-five veterinarians attended 
the course. One of the chief features of the course 
was the demonstration by Dr. W. I. Williams, Re- 
search Professor of Diseases of Breeding Cattle at 
Cornell University. 

The success of his system of treating the barren- 
ness in cows resulting from abortion disease has at- 
tracted the attention of veterinarians and stock own- 
ers throughout the country. The system requires 
special training and some of the California veterin- 
arians are planning to go to Ithaca, N. Y., for further 
study and practice under Dr. Williams. In addition 
to '.he special operations taught by Dr. Williams he 
recommends a system of preventive hygiene which 
should be carried out by every owner of valuable 
cattle, and which he explained at a lecture before the 
cattle breeders of the State at Sacramento on De- 
cember 26lh. He stated that abortion is a disease so 
widely disseminated that few dairy or pure bred 
herds are free from infection. 

The infection may even be present in cattle with- 
out the occurrence of abortions. When the virulence 
or disease producing power of the germs is high, 
losses occur in the herd from abortion, sterility, re- 
tained afterbirth, or diseased ovaries, and they also 
cause diseases of new-born calves such as calf 



Saturday, Februay 3, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



13 



scours, pneumonia, joint disease and similar compli- 
cations. In infected herds not only the aborting 
cows but non-aborting cows, bulls and calves may 
harbor the infection ,and calves and young heifers 
should be protected from infection. Heifers carrjing 
the first calf are more liable to abort than older 
cows. The two periods when the germs of abortion 
infection are most liable to gain entrance to the oft- 
spring are at the time the heifer calf is bom and at 
the time she is first seived by the bull. The en- 
trance of the germs at these times is especially 
liable to cause damage. In order to obviate as far 
as possible the infection, Professor Williams recom- 
mends the following procedure to all cattle owners 
having animals valuable enough to warrant the extra 
expense: 

Before and after service irrigate the sheath of the 
bull with one-fourth per cent Lugel's solution. It is 
advisable to administer a vaginal douche of this solu- 
tion an hour or two before service to cows which do 
not conceive at the first service. Dr. Williams has 
discovered that the use of this solution does not in- 
terfere in any way with conception. If the cow stili 
fails to breed, enlist the services of a qualified vet- 
erinarian who by manipulating the ovaries and cathe- 
terizing the uterus may be able to get the cow into 
breeding condition. 

When the cow has reached her 270th day of preg- 
nancy or earlier, if calving seems probable, give her 
a thorough bath with warm water and soap, lathering 
the skin repeatedly until thoroughly clean. Riuse off 
the soap and water with a one per cent solution of 
compound solution of cresol. Place the cow in a 
clean, disinfected stall. After the bathing wash the 
tail, vulva, thighs and udder daily with warm com- 
pound cresol solution, one and a half to two per cont, 
and douche the vagina daily with one-fourth per cent 
Lugol's solution. 

When the calf is born rub it dry and disinfect the 
stump of the navel cord. Do not tie it. Do not touch 
the navel stump with the hands. Fill a goblet or 
glass to the brim with 1-1000 corrosive sublimate 
solution and having the calf held on its feet, push the 
goblet against the navel region so as to submerge 
the navel stump completely and keep it submerged 
for fifteen minutes. (Corrosive sublimate tablets can 
be purchased of a size that one to one pint equals 
1-1000.) Then dust the navel stump over heavily 
with a powder composed of equal parts of powdered 
alum or boric acid. Place the calf in a clean, di^y, 
comfortable stall and keep it alone until two or three 
months old. Do not permit the calf to suck. 

According to Dr. Williams, it is best in most cases 
to feed calves on boiled milk. Some very young 
calves do not thrive on boiled milk and when it does 
not appear practicable to boil the milk the following 
special precautions should be taken to protect the 
milk for the calf from infection: 

Before drawing milk from the cow to feed the calf 
wash her vulva, tail, thighs and udder and douche 
the vagina according to the plan recommended prior 
to birth. The milker must first disinfect his hands 
and use a sterile pail. The first milk from each teat 
should be discarded. Repeat the washing of the 
vulva, tail, thighs and udder immediately before each 
milking. Repeat the vaginal douches daily until all 
discharges from the vulva have ceased. At eight or 
ten days of age nearly all calves may safely be placed 
on boiled milk. The milk which is boiled may be 
drawn from any economic source. In order to pre- 
vent scorching a large double boiler or water bath 
should be used to heat the milk. 

When all discharges after calving have ceased, vag- 
inal douching of cows may be stopped, though it 
would be well to continue the external washing of 
vulva, tail and udder daily in the interest of clean 
milk as well as of the general health of the herd. 
When abortion or retained afterbirth occurs each 
case should be handled individually by a skilled vet- 
erinarian and by the special treatment restored to 
health as promptly as possible. Much needless loss 
might bo saved by owners of valuaole pure bred cat- 
tle if the services of veterinarians skilled in the spe- 
cial work perfected by Dr. Williams were available. 
By a monthly or quarterly veterinary examination of 
all the animals in a herd, cases of sterility will be 
discovered before it is too late to cure them and in- 
curable or dangerous cases can be eliminated before 
they have done irreparable damage to the bull or 
other cows. 

This does not mean, however, that all animals in- 
fected with abortion should be disposed of. As a 
matter of fact in herds in which abortions are occur- 
ring a cow that has aborted once or twice may be 
just as valuable for breeding as one that has not. 
Cows seldom abort more than two or three times. 
Cows that are not made sterile by abortion will in 
all probability resume normal reproduction. On the 
other hand, if they are removed to make way for 
fresh animals there is a possibility that the new- 
comers already are or soon will be infected and are 
more liable to abort than the old ones. The elimina- 
tion of infected animals is, therefore, not to be rec- 
ommended as a means of controlling the disease 
unless their value is not great enough to warrant 
the expense of treatment. 

By keeping pregnant animals the disease will be 
brought to a standstill more quickly than if new 
susceptible material is continually added in their 
place. Some cows apparently become immune with- 
out aborting. It is the history of the disease in the 
great majority of herds that after reaching its 



height, it gradually subsides of its own accord until 
only a few slips occur each year or it may disappear 
entirely. In herds where abortions have not occurred 
for several years, or at least only rarely, the owner 
should take particular pains to prevent its introduc- 
tion. EveiT case of abortion should be regarded as 
infectious until proved otherwise. 
. For outbreaks of pneumonia and scours in calves 
Dr. Williams recommends the frequent use of enemas 
of physiological salt solution and the daily injection 
of liberal amounts of calf scour serum in addition to 
the special precautions to be taken at time of calving 
mentioned above. 

o 

Judging Horse's Age. 

I'ntil a horse is over ten years old the teeth fur- 
nish an indication of age which is fairly accurate. 
In estimating the age of a horse, only three pairs of 
front teeth or nippers on each jaw are considered. 
Horses, like human beings, have two sets of teeth; 
the first set, known as milk teeth, being replaced by 
permanent teeth. Now teeth have deep cups, or in- 
dentations, at their centers. As the teeth wear down 
these cups disappear. 

A colt does not usually get its first pair of nippers 
until it is a few days old, but has all three pairs by 
the time it is 6 to 10 months old. Until a colt is 3 
years old, however, its general appearance is relied 
upon largely to indicate its age . Following is a de- 
scription of the yearling changes which ordinarily 
occur in the teeth of a horse: 

One year. — The center pair of milk incisors, known 
as the pinchers, and the pair next to them, known as 
the intermediates, are well through the gums and in 
contact, but the corner pairs do not yet meet on a 
level. 

Two years. — The pinchers and intermediates indi- 
cate that they are being crowded by the permanent 
teeth, as they are pushed free from their gums at the 
base. By the time the colt is 2*4 years old the mid- 
dle pinchers should be through. The permanent teeth 
are much longer than the temporary ones. 

Three years. — The middle pinchers are large 
enough for use. Their deep cups show plainly. The 
milk intermediates are about to be shed. 

Four years. — The permanent intermediates appear 
at ZVz years and are ready for use at 4. The corner 
teeth give evidence that the permanent corners are 
coming. The cups in the pinchers are about one- 
third gone. (The tusks, or canine teeth, of male 
colts may appear about this time.) 

Five years. — The temporary corner teeth are shed 
at 41/^ and the permanent ones are ready to use. The 
horse has now what is known as a full mouth, all 
permanent incisors being ready to use. The cups 
of the first pair are about two-thirds gone. 

Six years. — The cups in the center pair have near- 
ly disappeared. In the second pair they are about 
t\\o-thirds gone. 

Seven years. — The cups from the second pair are 
now gone. There is a notch in the upper corner 
tooth where it overlaps the lower one. 

Eight years. — The cups having all worn out of the 
lower nippers, we now look at the upper jaw. Al- 
though cups remain in the center pair, they are not 
deep. 

Nine years. — The cups in the center pair of nip- 
pers on the upper jaw have disappeared. They are 
still present in the other two pairs, being fairly deep 
in the corner ones. 

Ten years. — The cups are worn out of the second 
pair on the upper jaw, although they are still present 
in the corner pair. 

Older horses. — At 11 years all of the cups are usu- 
ally worn out of the incisors- and it becomes neces- 
sary to use some other indication. Estimation of 
age may now be based upon the angle at which the 
teeth meet, their change in size and shape. As the 
horse gets older, the teeth meet more and more at 
an acute angle; that is, the jaws become more 
oblique. As the teeth wear down, the shape of the 
worn ends changes from oval to more nearly round 
and, finally, in an aged horse to a nearly triangular 
form. Sometimes cups are cut or burned in the teeth 
of old horses to make their mouths resemble those 
of younger animals. This practice, known as "Dish- 
oping," may be detected if the shape of the tooth and 
the absence of the ring of enamel which surrounds 
the natural cup are noted. After a horse is 12 years 
old its condition is more important than its age in 
determining values. 

o 

The national convention of wool growers at Salt 
Lake last week endorsed the idea of seeking a stand- 
ardization of wool and petitioned the department of 
agriculture to fix a definite system on which wool 
should be sold on the American markets. Other res- 
olutions called upon it to appropriate $300,000 to aid 
in gaining control over predatory animals and asked 
the different states to make appropriations for the 
same purpose. They urged the United States bureau 
of animal industry to conduct experiments to deter- 
mine the most economical method of feeding sheep 
on the range: condemned the agricultural committee 
of the House of Representatives at Washington for 
disallowing an appropriation of |20,000 for the estab- 
lishment of an experimental farm and expressed the 
hope that the Senate committee would reinstate the 
appropriation. They requested the flock-masters to 
have their wool graded at the shearing pens and 
pledged support to the secretary of the interior in 
the matter of laying trails through the national 
forests. 



Farm Advisor W. H. Hamilton of Monmouth 
county, New Jersey, reports the results of scientilic 
methods of handling a run-down orchard on a farm 
in the same county that resulted in the increasing in 
two yc^ars of the average yield of apples annually 
from 800 to 1000 bushels. Mr. Hamilton used the 
orchard, which the owner intended to cut down, to 
demonstrati' the results to be obtained by careful 
I)runing, spraying, fertilizing and cultivating. The 
cost of the extra cai'c, sprays and fertilizers amount- 
ed to five cents per bushel on the increased yield. 
Instead of poor, inferior Iruit of low market value, 
Mr. Hamilton secured high quality apples of high 
market value. 

•» 4> •» 

One of the difficulties confronting the man who 
aims to produce fall lambs for market is the fact 
that the regular time for ewes to drop their young 
is in the spring; while some will bred so as to drop 
their young late in the fall, the majority do not breed 
until fall, dropping the lambs the next spring. It is 
claimed that this has been overcome to some extent 
by the selection of November and December lambs 
as breeders for a flock of early lambing ewes each 
year, saving a few of the Decembei lambs to raise as 
breeding ewes. The usual method followed has been 
to pay particular attentiori to the feeding and care 
of the ewes during the winter, and after lambing in 
the spring get them in good vigorous condition be- 
foj'e turning them out to pasture. When placed in 
the pasture in May the rams ire turned out with 
them, and better results will be secured if two or 
three young active rams are allowed to run in the 
flock. 

•» •!• 4> 

.\ccording to experiments at the Kansas Experi- 
ment Station, the time to change the calf from whole 
milk to skim milk depends upon the development of 
the calf. It it is healthy it may be changed to skim 
milk at the end of the second week, but the third 
week would be better . This change must be made 
gradually by putting a small quantity of skim milk 
into each feeding. About a week or 10 days is re- 
quired. In this way the calf learns to like the skim 
milk without noticing the change. The right tem- 
perature for the milk is 100 degrees. It should be 
fed at as nearly this temperature as possible. Feed- 
ing cold milk at one meal and warm milk at another 
upsets the digestive system of the young calf. It 
is also important to feed the milk sweet. A single 
feed of sour milk might cause serious trouble for the 
young calf. Better let it miss a feed or even two 
than give it sour inilk. The pails out of which it is 
fed must be kept clean and sterile. 

* •!• ♦ 

The Hammond brothers of eastern Utah recently 
purchased 20<;0 head of sheep from W. T. Goslin of 
Mesa county, Colorado, for the big round figure of 
$12 a head. 

* ^ ♦ 

It has been a good many years since the old Dun- 
ham days with the great Brilliant at the head of 150 
of his colts, that we have seen such a display of all- 
around Percherons as were stacked up at the Denver 
show last week. France, in the decrepitude of her 
national struggle, can scarcely bring out as many 
good Percherons as may be found in our western 
states today ,and the pick of these were admired in 
Denver last week. The Belgians were also fine and 
it is a good thing for posterity that Americans have 
bein breeding these fine animals in a substantial 
way before the great crash came to wipe out the 
industry on its native sod. Europe will have to come 
to us to replenish its broken blood lines and keep 
some of the families going. The seven breeders of 
Belgians who were here last week seem to be pretty 
well fitted to pick up the banner and light the way 
for the perpetuation of the breed with their noble 
animals. If there were any Clydes, Shires or Suf- 
folk Punches in the show we did not notice them. — 
I Field and Farm. 

* * * 

In keeping your horses sound and well it is advis- 
able to keep on hand the Tuttle remedies. They are 
TuttU's Elixir, Hoof Ointment, Condition Powders, 
and others that have been used for years with the 
very best results. Send for the free booklet Veter- 
inary Experience. It gives a lot of infromation htat 
will bo useful to horse owners. 

* ♦ + 

J. I.,. Harlan, one of Yolo county's most progressive 
farmers, is the owner of a Holstein bull that Is a 
halt brother to the bull that was sold at auction at 
Portland, Oregon, a few weeks ago for the highest 
price ever paid lor a bull on the Pacific coast. The 
price was $21,500, and the animal was Flnderne Mu- 
tuale Fayne Valdessa, and John Von Herberg, owner 
of a fine herd at Kent, Washington, was the success- 
ful bidder. 

* * ♦ 

The Carr ranch of 5600 acres, in Monterey county, 
was sold last week to Mr. P. P. Brown at a reported 
price of $90,000, by Mrs. Jesse D. Scale, a daughter 
of the late Jesse D. Carr, of Salinas, and the deal, 
it is rumored, was made in the interest of the Pai- 
cines Ranch Company owned by A. K. Macomber. 
This fine tract of land adjoins the ranch of that com- 
pany and will make quite an addition to its already 
large holdings. About 600 acres of the Carr place 
is suitable for farming and the balance is fine grazing 
land. 



14 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 3, 1917 



GombBult's 

Caustic Balsam 

The Worlds OraafBst and Supost 

1^ Veterinary Remedy ^ 

HAS IMITATOmS BUT NO OOMPETITORSI 



S< FE, SPEEDY AND POSITIVE. 

Supersedes All Cautery or Fir- 
iat. Invaluable as a CURE for 

FOUNDER, 

WIND PUFF.'S, 

THRUSH, 

DIPHTHERIA, 

SICIN DISEASES, 

RINGBONE, 

PINK EYE, 

SVEENY, 
^ BONY TUMORS, 

LAMENESS FROM 

SPAVIN, 

QUARTER CRACKS, 
SCRATCHES, 
POLL EVIL, 
PARASITES, 
REMOVES 
BUNCHES or 
BLEMISHES, 
SPLINTS, 
CAPPED I ' >CK, 
STRAINE." TENDONS. 



W» guKimnUe that one tablespoonful of C»a»tlo 
6*t!>*m will produce more actual rf suits than a whola 
buttle of anj liniment or spavin mixture erer made 
Erery bottle sold !• warranted to glre satisfaction 
Write for testimonials showing what the most prorol 
nent horsemen say of It. Price, Sl.f^O per bottle. 
Sold I17 drufffflsts, or sent by express, cbarffea paid, 
with f uli dlrectlous for Its use. 

ThB AooQaied Standard 
VETERINANY REMEDY 

Always Rellablom 

Sure In Raaultmm 



A y-r TTmr genuine witJuiut «?» sifnemnii 

SAFE FOR ANfONE TO USE. , *^^'^l'^X?S[LTst'^} Cleveland, o 



NOTHING BUT GOOD KESULTS, 
l*^*^!"""' GOSfBAl l.T .-, C4USTIC BALSAM for more 

■ »»n20r»ar,. It U tli, bMt bli.Wr I h»v« ei erlrie.1 I h»v. 

■ jied 11 m hundred. Qf ca«nwithW»» rtjults. Itlipor- 
If.ctly i.f. for the most Inexperienced Pfr.on to ui«. This 

■ Is the large.* breedinu eitabliihrnent of trotlin« h..r«e. lo 

■ tbe world, . nil nia your bli.ter often -W. H. HAYnUND, 
■Pre,. BelaienI I'srk Slotk Karm. Belmont Psrk, Mont 



USED 10 TEARS SrrCESSFrM.T. 
lhavauied OOMBIVI.T S CAl'STIC BALSAM fer tea | 

I year, ; have been very successful in curing curb.ringboae, 
capped hock and knee, bad ankles, rheumatism . and a]> 
moat every cause of lameness in horses Have eatable of I 
forty head, mostly track and speedway horses, and ear- | 
tainly can recommend it — T. C. CRISKB, Tralalat I 
Blables. 890 Jennlsga Street, New Tort City. 



Soiv AgantB for the United States and Oanadam 

The Lawrence^Wiiiiams Com 

TORONTO, OUT, GLEVELAND, OHIO. 



..Modern Horse Management.. 

By 

CAPTAIN R. S. TIMMIS 



Nearly 500 photographs and drawings. 
144 Plates 11x8. Royal quarto, 316 
pages. Cassell & Co.: London, To- 
ronto, Melbourne, etc. Stokes & Co.: 
New York. $5 postpaid. 

"A most valuable authority." — Sporting 
and Dramatic News, London. 

"Very sound and well thought out." — The 
Field. 

"A book that should be widely known." — 
Horse and Hound. 

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grounded in practical experience." — 
Bloodstock Breeders' Review. 

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horse owner." — The Broad Arrow. 

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"On a scale not heretofore attempted by 
a writer." — Horse World, Buffalo. 

"Deserves the widest possible apprecia- 
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For sale by 

BREEDER & SPORTSMAN, 
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TOD CAN'T CTT OCT A 

Bog Spavin or Thoroughpin 

but you can clean tiiem off promptly with 




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you work the horse same time. 
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hair. S2.(lO per bottle, deHverctl. 
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LANQHORNE TABB ANDERSON 

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SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

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ALL CUTS 
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THE BEST GOOSE CALLERS IN THE 
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FOR PARTICULARS and RESERVATiON PHONE OR WRITE: 



W. Gordon Wagner 

PROPRIETOR 

HOTEL RIO VISTA 
Rio VIsta — California 




HORSE 
EALTH 



IT THOROUGHLY CLEANS, TONES and STRENGTH- 
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building up horses run -^^^c;^^ 1^^ 
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Classified Advertising 



WANTED. 

Position as trainer by a thoroughly 
competent man of good habits. Has 
trained and raced horses on the eastern 
circuit and in California. Can furnish 
high-class recommendations and refer- 
ences. Address TRAINER, Box 212, 
Pleasanton, Cal. 

FOR SALE 
BELGIAN STALLION, registered, 
weighs 1050, 8 years old. A high class 
horse in every respect; sound and hand- 
some. Sires high-class colts. Will sell 
cheap for quick sale. 
Address 

A. L. WATSON, 
Patterson, Stanislaus Co., Cal. 



LIVE STOCK INSURANCE: Registered 
live stock and farm work horses should 
be insured. The Hartford Company, 
strongest in the world writing live stock. 
No trouble to answer questions. D. O. 
Lively, special representative, 215 Ho- 
bart Bldg., San Francisco. 
AT LAST THE PERFECT SILO— THE 
STAY ROUND: No hoops. No bolts. No 
experiments. Any one can erect. Close 
price. Address D. O. Lively, 215 Hobart 
Bldg., San Francisco. 



THOROUOHBRKD STALLION FOR SALB 

Urown. si.\ years old. sired by Orsinl, dftm 
Leta Trix by Brutus, sound. Bred by J. J. 
Moore. Address JAMES LAYNK. 

26 S. River Street. San Joie. Cal. 



Saturday, Februay 3, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER A 



ND SPORTSMAN 



15 



YOUR BEST HORSE MAY BE DEAD TOMORROW 

The "TWO HARTFORDS" 

With Resources exceeding $30,000,000 

Insures your horses, giving you full 
protection of loss from any cause. 

Better Be Safe than Sorry ! 

Address all inquiries to 

ROLAND G. DRAKE, Asst. 6en. Apt, 

PACIFIC LIVESTOCK DEPARTMENT, HARTFORD FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

^58 California Street, San Francisco, Cat. 

Mantien The Br««d«r and Sporiaman 



READ 

"THE RIGHT TO BE WELL BORN" 

— OR — 

''Horse -Breeding in Its Relation to 
Eugenics" 

By. W. E. D. STOKES, President 

THE PATCHEN WILKES STOCK FARM, LEXINGTON, KY. 

AT ALL AMERICAN NEWS STANDS AND AT ALL BOOK STORES 




MANHATTAN STOCK AND POULTRY 

FOOD AND REMEDIES 

Awarded Gold Medal 
at California State Fair 

ENDORSED BY THE LEADING HORSEMEN 
OF THE UNITED STATES 

Red Ball Stock Food Co., 

OAKLAND CAL. 




Convenience- 
Train Schedules 
Fast Service 
Clean comfortable riding 
Observation car service 
Courteous employes 
Electrically heated cars 
Modern steel coaches. 

Between San Francisco 

AND POINTS IN THE 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY 

Ontht "Stn Francisco-Sacramento Scenic Line" 
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Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Ry. 

BAN FRANCISCO DEPOT FERRY liUILDINCi 
PHONK SUTTER 2339. 

TELEPHONE KENNELS 

S30 FULTON ST., SAN FRANCISCO 

T«l. Market 2074. 

Dofs and pups of all breeds for sale. 
Dogs boarded under sanitary condi- 
tions. Special care of bitches in whelp 
and puppies. Dogs clipped and baths 
carefully given. Positively no sick 
dogs accepted. 

IRA BARKER DALZIEL, 

Proprietor. 



"WATCH-IT-CET-EM" 

POSITIVELY DESTROYS 

ANTS. COCKROACHES. BED-BUGS, 
FLIES and CHICKEN LICE 

MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE 

Used Extensively by Railroads, Steamship 
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Gets the Nest as Well as the Parent 

m POISONOUS— DOES NOT LOSE STRENGTH 

ASK YOUR DEALER SEND 6c IN STAMPS FOR TRIAL CAN 

"Watch-It-Get- Em" Co., 

OF CALIFORNIA 
Nos. 19 to 25 Minna St., San Francisco 



118 to 160 Clara St. 
San Franclico, Cal. 



G. LINDAUER 

General Livery and Sale Business 

COUNTRY HORSES FOR SALE 

WEIGH IN(; 1200 Lbs. TO 1700 Lbs. 

Mules in Carload Lots 

Horaia and RIfi of All Deicrlptlont for Nira at All Tlmoi 

BLAKE MOFFIT & TOWNE 
PAPER 



DEALERS 
IN 



•7-1«t St., San Franolaoo, Cal. 

niak*. IfcFaU Jk Co., Portland. Or*. 
Ulak*. MoWt an4 Town*. Lot / ojk'm 



BEGIN YOUR 1917 STALLION AD. NOW 
WE PRINT STALLION CARDS & FOLDERS 

THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



To Be Sure You're Shooting a 



SMOKELESS SHOTGUN POWDER 

DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
OR SCHULTZE 

Should Be on Case, Carton 
and the Top Shot Wad 

There is prevalent among shooters some con- 
fusion concerning Du Pont brands of smokeless 
shotgun powders; DUPONT, BALLISTITE 
and SCHULTZE are the Smokeless Shotgim 
Powders manufactured by the Du Pont Company 

Look at the Top Shot Wad 

—if it reads DUPONT, BALLISTITE or SCHULTZE 
you have the Du Pont Company's powder in your 
shot shells. 

Ask for DUPONT, BALLISTITE or SCHULTZE at 
your dealer's or club when buying loaded shells. 

For booklets giving loads for trap and game shooting, 
or any information about sporting powders, write to 

£. /. DU PONT DE NEMOURS & CO. 

POWDER MAKERS SINCE 1802 

WILMINGTON, DELAWARE 

BRANCHES: SAN FRANCISCO. SEATTLE and DENVER 



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OVER FORTY-SIX YEARS EXPERIENCE IN BANKING 
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CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $4,500,0D0. 



Horses WOl Die- 

Same with the other classes of livestock. 

Their value when dead is equal only to the amount 

of insurance by which they are protected. 

Let's talk it over. 

Montana livestock & Casualty Insurance Go. 

DOUGLAS KEITH, General Agent Northern Califor- 
nia, 701 Royal Insurance BIdg., San Francisco. 

W. H. MILLER, General Agent Southern California, 
505 Lankershim BIdg., Los Angeles. 



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Use the © Brand Shells and Cartridges 



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idence of quality, and during the year 1916, the exceptional shooting proficiency of 



^Wherever ammunition is used the name of "Peters" is synonymous with uumi-i it. i nc mgn sicinadrus usca m mc proaucnon or mese gooas guaraniee 
that every lot of shells or cartridges shipped under our labels embodies all the essentials of perfect ammunition, such as accuracy, penetration, uniformity 
and general reliability. 

^ In the last analysis, successful performance is the most conclusive evi 
Peters shells has again been demonstrated. 

Mr. Rolla O. Heikes, a veteran of more than 25 years' experience In trapshooting, began using Peters shells a little over a year ago and his Official Average 
for 1916, 96.24";^. exceeds by several per cent the best average he ever made with other matees of shells. 

Similarly Mr. W. R. Crosby, another man vyith country-wide fame among trapshooters and sportsmen of all classes, averaged in 1916 96.79^, using 
Peters shells exclusively and exceeding any yearly average he has ever made on a similar or greater number of targets when using other brands of ammu- 
nition. • 

Add to this the achievement of Mr. Woolfoil< Henderson in winning the Official High Amateur Average in 1914, 96.63'';, and In 1915, 97.53Ct, and Second 
Amateur honors in 1916, 97.14%, and you have evidence enough to convince the most skceptlcal that Peters shells are a real contributor to the malting of 
high scores. /f^\ 

The amateur shooter who heeds the handwriting on the wall and decides to use the( UJ brand shells in 1917 Is sure to mal<e Ihe best scores of which 
he is capable. 

HWe extend to the members of the shooting fraternity our best wishes for the Ne^ Year, 



including "100''/<." happiness and a "straight 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE CO.. 



run" of 365 prosperous days. 

BRANcS^°^." 585-587 Howard Street. 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 




For Rifle Clubs and 
Military Training Classes 



The .22 calibre Winchester musket with military sight and 
sling strap, is a strong favorite with experienced rifle men. 
Its superior accuracy, whether shooting prone or off hand, is 
a well established and widely known fact. 
The musket weighs 8^ pounds, and is chambered for the economical .22 short and the accurate .22 long rifle car- 
tridge. With the latter cartridge, remarkable groups; are being made by members of rifle clubs all over the country, 
shooting in the indoor matches, conducted by the National RiHe Association. 

Member of Business Men's Military Training Classes, throughout the United States are obtaining valuable indoor 
target practice with this accurate arm. This is a real target rifle, for earnest men. Ask your dealer to show you one. 

BEHIND EACH WINCHESTER STANDS A HALF CENTURY OF RELIABILITY 





PINEHURST 

1917's First Big Trap Event Heads Victory Roll for 

Shooters of R^^jUf^^^'^ Guns and Shells 




THE WINNERS 
IKA GALBRAITH. West Frankfort, 111. 

(lEO. N. FISn. Lyndonvllle. N. Y. 

DANIEL F. McMAHON. New York Atliletic Clul. 

R. L. SPOTTS ) 

H. J. PENOERGAST } Repre senting New York City 
I). F. MfMAIlON 1 
WALTER HUFF Macon. Ga. 



THE EVENT.S 
Midwinter Handicap 

High Amateur Average 
Preliminary Handicap 

Tliree->Ian Team 
(7 teams entered i 

High Professional 



THE SCORES THE WINNER S CHOICE 

97 X lOO Hemington UMC Pump Gun and Nitro Club. 
(21 yds.) Spewl Shells. 

488 .\ 500 Nitro Club Speed Shells. 

92 X 100 Nitro Club Speed Shells. 

1.441 X 1..500 All Shooting Remington UMC Speed Shells. 

473 X 500 Remington UMC Speed Shells. 



Ri-mington UMC shooters were high on li; yard and all targets in both Professional and Amateur Classes, and also won 2d and urd .A^mateur Plaoe> 




The Surest Way to Winningtown is Via the 
Red Ball Line 




Parker Gun Records 

MIJ HENRY PFIRRMANN, JR., with his 34-inch double barrel Parker made the 

HIGHEST GENERAL OFFICIAL AMATEUR AVERAGE 
on the Pacific Coast during 1916. He also won the 

CHAMPIONSHIP OF CALIFORNIA 

scoring 100 straight targets, and made the highest General Average at the Ver- 
non Gun Club, July 2 to 4, 1916, scoring 493 out of 500 targets with the same gun. 

PARKER GUNS 

made the highest Official Averages in America in 1914 and 1915. 
PARKER 20-gauge guns are the pioneer small bore guns of America. 
For further particulars regarding guns of 8 to 28 gauge, address 

Parker Bros., Meriden, Conn. 

New York Salesroom, 32 Warren St. 

or— A. W. du BRAY, Residing Agent, San Francisco, Cal.; P. O. Box 102 



"TRAINING THE HOUND — 

A PRACTICAL TREATISE ON THE TRAINING OF FOX HOUNDS, BEAQLEt, 

AND COON HOUNDS. 

The system of training advocated is simple and effective, so that anyone who car- 
ries out instructions can easily develop a foxhound, a beagle or a coon doK to the 
highest state of usefulness or organize a pack in which each hound will work Independ- 
ently and at the same time harmoniously with the others. The subjects are: The 
Hound's Ancestry, History, Instinctive Tendencies, English and Native Hounds, Devel- 
oping the Intelligence, Training the Foxhound, Voices and Pace of the Hound, Quali- 
ties of Scent. Manners, Training the Coon Dog, Coon Hunting, Training the Beagle, 
Forming a Pack, Field Trial Handling, Faults and Vices, Conditioning, Selecting and 
Rearing Puppies. Kennels and Yards, Diseases of Hounds and Their Treatment. The 
chapters on field trial training and handling are alone worth the price of the boolL 
which is one that every man who loves the voice of a hound should read. 

The book contains 224 pages, is clearly printed, nicely bound, and handsomely lllua- 
trated with bloodhounds, various types of English and American foxhound*, beaglea 
and cross-bred dogs for 'possum and coon hunting. 

Price, In heavy paper cover, $1; $1.50, postpaid. 



ADDRESS: 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

9. O. DRAWKR 447, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



2 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



r Saturday, February 10, 1917 



Pleasanton Driving Parl( 

PLEASANTON. CALIFORNIA 

offers for service for the season of 1917 the following stallions: 

THE ANVIL 2.02 3-4 

rJon-Standard Cal. State License No. 2. 
FASTEST TROTTING STALLION EVER OFFERED FOR SERVICE IN 
CALIFORNIA AND FIFTH FASTEST ENTIRE TROTTER IN THE WORLD 
Son of St. Valiant Vincent 2:11% (by St. Vincent 2:13% out of the triple 
producer Grace Lee 2:29% by Electioneer 125); dam Amy Smith by Emperor 
AVilkes 2:20%. sire of Princess Eulalia (4) 2:09%, etc.; grandam by Hamble- 
lonian 539. 

The Anvil is regarded by Edward F. Geers as one of the very greatest trot- 
ters that he has ever raced. For five years the pair of Tennesseeans went to 
the races together and in that time were but twice unplaced, while winining a 
total of fifteen races, includiner the historic M. and M. 

As an individual he is most pleasing, not too large or coarse In any way but 
.smoothly and compactly made and "all horse" in every line. He is a perfect 
headed, pure gaited trotter, with the very best of disposition, and is destined 
to become a very great sire of trotting speed. His opportunities in the stud 
have been very slight as he has been retired from racing only since the close 
of 1914. He was selected to head the stud at Pleasanton Driving Park not only 
on account of his great qualities as a race trotter, but because one of his first 
foals, Anvilite (2) 2:22%, with a trial of ten seconds or more faster, was in 
every way the greatest colt trotter ever handled by C. L. DeRyder. The services 
of The Anvil are recommended to you without reserve. 

Fee for THE ANVIL 2:02 3-4, $50 with usual privilefe 

Vernon McKinney 2:01 1-2 

Pure Bred Cal. State License No. 39 
Fastest member of the great family of McKinney 2:11 J^i 
Sire of VERNA McKINNEY (2) 2:13 (his first foal raced), fastest two- 
year-old pacing filly of 1915, three-year-old record, 1916, 2:09|,4; 
VERNON DIABLO, mat. rec. half mile track 2:14i4, and DR. DYER 
(3) trial 2:12!^. 

;?on of Guy McKinney 37625 (by McKinney 2:11% out of Flossie Drais by Guy 
Wilkes 2:15Vi); dam Maud Vernon by Mount Vernon 2:15%, sire of the dams of 
I..eata J. 2:03, etc.; grandam Mag by General McClellan, sire of the dams of 
Mack Mack 2:08. etc. 

Vernon McKinney's racing career was not an extensive one but will long be 
remembered for the excellence of his performances, as his winnings include a 
Chamber of Commerce stske in time very near the record for that event at the 
time, and he is the fastest of all the McKinneys. 

He is a horse of rare qualities In the way of Individual excellence, almost 
ideal in behavior and temperament in harness or out. Since his retirement he 
has been a popular horse in the stud and our claim that he would prove a very 
great sire of pacing speed has been fully sub.<;tant'ated, his first foal to be raced 
being the season champion for the age and gait In 1915, a most excellent testi- 
monial to his potency. He is a very sure breeder, his get are uniformly endowed 
with natural spe^d and the physical and mental requirements of modern race 
hori?es and find ready sale at most gratifying prices. 

Fee for VERNON McKINNEY 2:01 I-2. $50 with usual privilege. 

The bc.^t of cnn taken of marcs in iiny manner owner.s ni.'iy de.siro, but no 
responsibility assumt d for accidents or escapes. Address for particulars 



GEORGE F. RYAN, Superintendent, 



PLEASANTON, CAL. 



Thoroughbred sire M ARSE ABE 

WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1917 AT 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK 



Marse Abe carries the best 
blood of America through his 
sire lines. Yankee was a su- 
perior race horse and sire. Han- U 
over was the best horse of his 80 
day, and headed the list of win- < 
nlng sires for years. No refer- y 
ence is necessary to Hindoo as ^ 
everyone knows what he was. 
Halo, the dam of Marse Abe, < 
is bred Just right to cross with ^ 
the sire blood In his pedigree; 
a daughter of St. Blaise, son of 
Hermit, the most fashionable 
sire line in England, and backed 
up on her dam's side by the 
lines of long distance perform- 
ers from which sprung Ten 
Brock and other four-milers. 

-Address all comtnnnication8 to 



Service Fee $50 



, Hindoo iX.'""^' 

1 Hanover ' ' Florence 

.. . I ( Bourbon Belle \ otland 

Yankee I i Ella D. 

„ .. (Himyar / A'"" 

I Correction. .' I Hira 

(Mannie Gray... | f"'!."''"" 
I Lizzie O . 

, „, . f Hermit / N.wminster 

I St. TSlaise . J I Seclusion 

J (Fusee jMarsyas 

• ( Vesuvie""" 



Halo. 



I, ^ ( KInl Alfonso... / 

I Ida K ) 1 Capitola 

/Lerna (Asteroid 

) Laura 

GEO. F. RYAN, 

Pleasanton, Cal. 



DILLCARA 57462 



Son of Sidney Dillon 23157 (sire of 9 in 2:10 list) and Guycara by Guy Wilkes 
2867 (sire of 3 in 2:10 list), will make the season of 1917 at 

PLEASANTON DRIVING PARK, PLEASANTON, GAL. 

SERVICE FEE $50 TO INSURE 

Dlllcara is a full brother to Harold Dillon 39610, the leading sire of New Zealand. 
Last season the get of Harold Dillon won 41 races, totalling over $25,000. 
Address all communications to 

GEO. F. RYAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



Ansel M. Easlon 



William Ward 
IMPORTERS AND BREEDERS 
of Prize Winning 

SHIRE HORSES 



Blackhawk Stock Ranch 

Barns full of top notch two to five year old Stallions 

IMPORTED AND HOME BRED 

With weight, style, and quality, heavy clean bone and the best of breeding to recom- 
mend them. Show horses and prize winners. Great opportunity to secure a top-notch 
stallion. 

BLACKHAWK STOCK RANCH, Burllngame, Cal. 
Plcaie lend for free photographic cataloffua. Telephone Burllngame 131 



MARSHALL CHIEF 2765 

MISSOURI'S CHAMPION SADDLE STALLION 1916. 

By McDonald Chief by Rex McDonald 833; Dam, Minnie Mirsliall by Bourbin Chief. 

In Public Service at Mexico, Mo., Season 1917 

AT $25 CASH FOR SEASON 

No more .scientific nor successful blending of the best of the 
Denmarks, (Rex McDonald) and the Chiefs, (Bourbon 
Chief) can be found than is represented in ^Marshall Chief. 

INDIVIDUALITY and ACHIEVEMENT COUPLED WITH PEDIGREE. 
WM. WALLACE, Philadelphia, Pa., Owner. 



FOR FURTHER P.\RTICULARS WRITE 



HANS BERG, 159 Warrin Ave., 
Milwaukee, Wis., 



or 



E. N. HAMILTON, Manager, 
Mexico, Mo. 



The World's Champion 
Saddle Stallion 



ASTRAL KING 



HAS DEMONSTRATED BEYOND QUESTION THAT 
LIKE BEGETS LIKE 

HIS PROGENY ARE HIS NEAREST RIVALS 

If you have a ile.sire to own a winner come here and buy an A.-tral King. The 
lieight of every horse lovers' ambition is to breed a winner. There is only one way, 
mate your mares to the champion and sire of winners. A few outstanding young- 
sters for sale. For the services of the champion, addrer^s: 

THE ASTRAL KING FARM, Jefferson City, Mo. 

JAS HOUCHIN, Owner. T. D. ANDERSON, Supt. 



RECORD 2.25}.< 
REG. NO. 41513 



EXPRESSIVE MAC 

Sire Of: CLARA MAC 2:04 i; VERA HAL 2:05; 

Only stallion offered for service in California sire of two in 2:05, three in 2:10 
.Son of McKINNEY 2:11', and tl..' groatest living broodmare. EXPRESSIVE O) 2:12'S (dam 
of I'l trotters. J in 2:10i by BLECTIONEER 125. Ideal in color, siz.; and conformation — »eal 
brown, heijfht 16'4 bands, weigbt VJ7.5 pounds. $25 the Season, $35 to insure, usual return 
privileue. .Send for tabulated pidigne. Address: J. H. NELSON, Selma, Cal. 



JOE CAREY 



$50 



THOROUGHBRED STALLION 

Pure Bred Cal. State License No. 2004 



Sire of 
Brighouse 
Orange Blossom 
Custom House 
Azurea 
Mercurlum 
Deckhand 
Buckshot 

Bernice, and other 
Good winners. 



fBannockburn. 

< 

u 

u 
o 

I Miss Clarion.. 



r «fcd. ^ 1 E^si^r^ Pr^nceM 

! /Nannie Bay {gi^t^^tler 

I Bettie Blaise. .. ^ i" 



f Himyar.. 



imp. .\stolat. 



.i-^"'™ 

KS*"" 

'i^'*^ 



/ Bellicent ! 

I Lynette by 
Lord Lyon 

Addrass all communications to: 

GEO. RYAN, Pleasanton, Cal. 



BREED TO THE COAST'S CHAMPION CAMPAIGNER AND 




Jim Logan 

Pure Bred. Cal. Stale 



FUTURITY SIRE 

Rec. 2:01 3-4. 
Reg. No. 44977 

_. _ License No. 17 

Sire of Hal Logan 2:09, Maxine (3) 2:15, winner of 

Breeders' Futurity, etc. 
Son of CHARLES DERBY 2:20, brother to Klatawah 
(3) 2:051/2, etc., and sire of TEN in 2:10. 
Dam, EFFIE LOGAN, dam of Jim Logan 2:01%, Sir 
Albert S. 2:03%, and Dan Logan 2:07V4. 

In the stud, season of 1917, at Woodland Race Track. 
FEE: $50, usual return privilege, $75 to Insure liv- 
ing colt payable at time of service or before removal 
of mares. Call at race track or address 

J. ELMO MONTGOMERY, Davis, Cal. 



Jewel Dare 3025 For Sale 

On account of other business taking my entire time, I am offering for sale the 
Great Show Horse and sire, Jewel Dare 3025, by My Dare, 1st dam Maud Jewel, making 
him a full brother to Gypsy Dare and half-brother to the $10,000 My Major Dare. 

Jewel Tucker, by Jewel Dare 3025, 1st dam Sallie Tucker. Foaled 1915. A constant 
winner in 1915 and 1916 including Kentucky State Fair winning. 

The great brood mare, S.nllle Tucker 7032, by My Own Kentucky, a proven dam of 
high quality. Two extra good geldings by Sir Bourbon, one and five years old, extra 
fine. These are all high-class horses at low prices for quick sale. Your Inspection 
Invited. 

CLARENCE B. SMiTH. Shelbyville, Ky. 



Saturday, February 10, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



3 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 
Turf and Sporting Authority on the Pacific Coa«t. 

(Established 1882.) 
Published every Saturday. 
F. W. KELLEY, Proprietor. 



OFFICES: 363-365-366 PACFIC BUILDING 
Cor. of Market and Fourth St3.. San Francisco. 
P. O. DRAWER 447. 
National Newspaper Bureau, Agent, 219 East 23rd St.. 

New York City. 
Entered as Second Class Matter at San Francisco P. O. 



Terms — One year, |3; sii months, $1.76; three months, $1. 

Foreign postage fl per year additional; Canadian postage 
60c per year additional. 

Money should bo sent by Postal Order, draft or regis- 
tered letter addressed to F. W. Kelley, P. O. Drawer 
447, San Francisco, California. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's 
name and address, not necessarily for publication, but 
as a private guarantee of good faith. 



THE WORK of organizing a California circuit of 
harness racing which has been undertaken by the 
recently organized California Fair and Racing Asso- 
ciation is steadily progressing. Secretary Joseph 
Waddell spent the past week in visiting Marysville, 
Woodland, Dixon and Stockton and the preliminary 
work of bringing those cities into line is well under 
way. Some of these places are hardly ready to give 
a fair this year, but will join the circuit with a race 
meeting and horse show, thus providing a complete 
circuit for the harness horsemen. There is an ex- 
cellent chance of Stockton taking the week following 
the State Fair and if this is done it will fill in a 
week that has not otherwise been claimed. Mr. 
Waddell will visit Fresno, Hanford, Riverside and 
Los Angeles during the coming week and will be 
able to report fully at a meeting of the California 
Fair and Racing Association which will be called 
to meet in San Francisco on Saturday, the 24th inst. 
At this meeting everyone interested in a circuit of 
fairs and race meetings is invited to be present. 
Many interesting addresses will be made and a gen- 
eral movement started for the advancement of the 
horse breeding interests of California. 

o 

Volume 21 of the American Trotting Register has 
been received at this office. It is three years since 
volume 20 was issued, and the new volume contains 
the names of all stallions from No. 59500 to 63599. 
The rules for registration of standard trotters and 
pacers are the same as have been in effect since 
November 1st, 1898. The printing and binding are 
uniform with previous volumes of this work. 
4» * •§• 

Albaloma 2:08i,4, now owned by S. H. Cowell and 
in the training stable of Walter Tryon at Sacra- 
mento, has won nearly $17,000 during his racing 
career. In 1912 he won three races and $4162; in 
1913 he had four first moneys to his credit and $5725; 
in 1914 he took his record of 2:081^, won five races 
and $2150, and in 1915, the last year he was raced, 
he won two races and $4834. The total for the four 
years was 14 races and $16,862 won. 

4» "i" ♦ 

Harold Welcome, the pacing stallion that reduced 
his record last year to 2; 08^/4 at Boise, Idaho, is now 
thirteen years old. He was foaled in 1904, was bred 
by the late Horry W. Meek of San Lorenzo, and is 
by Welcome out of Judith, sister to Janice 2:08i/4, by 
William Harold, second dam Fenella, by Fallis 4781, 
third dam Patti (dam of 2 in th« list) by Nutwood 
600, fourth dam the thoroughbred mare Centennial 
Belle that was the grandam of Clipper 2:06. The 
fifth dam, Bonnie Belle, was a full sister to Langford, 
sire of the grandam of Guy Axworthy, sire of the 
world's champion trotting stallion Lee Axworthy 
l:58i/i. Judith, the dam of Harold Welcome, was 
sold at an auction held by the Meek Estate in 1903 
and purchased by James Faris Jr., then of Sacra- 
mento, but now of Red Deer, Alberta, Canada. Judith 
was in foal at the time to Welcome and Harold Wel- 
come was foaled the following spring. Harold Wel- 
come raced over the Inter-Mountain circuit last year, 
won three races, got second money five times and 
third money once out of nine starts. He did not 
start in any race in which he failed to win at least 
♦ ♦ ♦ 

Eight of the twelve members of the state board 
of agriculture, whose terms had expired, were re- 
appointed to their jobs by Governor Hiram W. John- 
son this week. 

Those named to serve on the board again were 
Charles J. Chenn of Sacramento, T. H. Ramsey of 
Red Bluft, John M. Perry of Stockton, Theodore Gier 
of Oakland, E. Franklin of Colfax, E. F. Mitchell of 
San Francisco, I. L. Borden of San Francisco and 
E. J. Delorey of Los Angeles. The appointments 
extend over a period of four years. 

Some of the terms of the men reappointed expired 
several years ago. Chenu had been serving since 
1913 and Gier since 1914 without being appointed. 



WiNRACES AND TliVlE ALLOWANCES. 



Hartford, Conn., Feb. 2, 1917. 

Aa there is a tendency to misunderstand the new 
time allowance rule by getting it confu.sed with the 
one defining the four seconds difference between win- 
races made on a mile and a half mile track, and 
especially when a horse has a half mile track win- 
race within the four seconds allowance fixed by Rule 
7, Section 5, an explanation will materially assist 
owners and racing officials in its application. A win- 
race is defined in Rule 2, Section 10, as follows: "A 
winrace is the fastest time made by the winning 
horse in a public race or in an event in which he 
stood best in the summary. "Nothing is said in 
this rule as to whether the winrace was made over 
a mile or half-mile track. It is simply the fastest 
and the one to which the time allowance granted by 
Rule 7, Section 6, is added in the event of a horse 
being entitled to any. 

In the National Trotting Association Winrace and 
Eligibility List which is published in Volume 32 of 
Wallace's Year Book, no reference is made to a win- 
race made over a half mile track in connection with 
the performance of a horse except when he has a 
winrace made over a mile track and also one made 
over a half mile track and which is within the four 
seconds limit fixed by Rule 7, Section 5, which reads 
as follows: 

"A horse with a winrace made on a mile track 
shall be allowed four seconds when entering on a 
half-mile track, providing the class to which he would 
be eligible under this allowance is not slower than 
his winrace on a half-mile track." 

If the latter, that is, his winrace made over a half- 
mile track, is three seconds slower than his winrace 
made on a mile track he is entitled to but three sec- 
onds. If it is but two seconds, he is entitled to two. 
This is the first time allowance rule that was ever 
adopted. It was originally enacted by the National 
Trotting Association in 1912. At that time the differ- 
ence was fixed at three seconds. In 1914, it was 
increased to four seconds. There is no connection 
between this allowance and the one fixed by Rule 7, 
Section 6, which reads as follows: 

"After a horse has acquired a winrace he shall be 
allowed whether raced or not, one second for each 
calendar year until he equals or reduces it. No other 
time allowances shall be permitted. A nominator is 
required to claim time allowance when making 
entry." 

Section 5 covers the difference fixed in the rules 
by actual performance while Section 6 covers the 
year or years in which a horse has for any reason, 
whether raced or not, failed to equal or reduce his 
winrace, the limit being fixed for one second for 
each calendar year. 

In order to illustrate the two sections of this rule 
the names of the following well known performers 
are presented together with an explanation showing 
what allowances they are entitled to in 1917. 
.loan, br m (p) by Directum Spier(1914) (m) 2:04% 
Earl Jr. (p), gr s by The Earl ... (1915) (m) 2:01 
Peter Scott, b s by Peter the G't (1915) (m) 2:05% 
Hal B. Jr. (p), br s by Hal B....(1913) (m) 2:021/2 

(1916) (1/2) 2:051/2 
Fred W (p) b g by Modern Chimes(1914) (m) 2:09 
Texas Jim (p), b g by Texas Jack(1915) (m) 2:04i/2 

(1915) (V2) 2:07% 

Judge Ormonde (p), bl s by 

Ormonde (1915) (m) 2:033^ 

(1916) (1/2) 2:071/2 
Aconite (p), b s by Aquilin (1915) (m) 2: 07 1/2 

(1916) (1/2) 2:10% 

Ida May W., bl m by Cazeaux (1914) (m) 2:181/2 

(1914) (1/2) 2:201/2 
Add F (p), b R by Jno. J Hughes (1913) (m) 2: 09 1/2 

(1913) (1/2) 2:101/4 

Earl Jr. made his winrace in 1915, on a mile track. 
He has not a half-mile track winrace within four 
seconds limit and is entitled to one second time al- 
lowance as he failed to equal or reduce his winrace 
in 1916. He is therefore entitled to the four seconds 
allowance when entering on a half-mile track and 
one second for failing to equal or reduce his winrace 
of 2: 01 1/0 in 1916. He can therefore start in the 2:03 
class on mile tracks and the 2:07 class on half-mile 
tracks in 1917. 

Joan made her winrace of 2:04'/i in 1914. She is 
entitled to two seconds time allowance and is eligi- 
ble to the 2:07 class on a mile track and the 2:11 
on a half-mile track in 1917, providing she does not 
equal or reduce her winrace of 2: 04 1/1. Peter Scott 
has a winrace of 2:05i^ made in 1915. He is entitled 
to one second time allowance for 1916 and under the 
same can start in the 2:07 class on a mile track and 
the 2:11 class on a half-mile track until he equals or 
reduces his winrace. If he should be taken up and 
trained this year and failed to do so-, in 1918, under 
the present rules, if continued without change in 
1918, he would be eligible to the 2:08 class on a 
mile track and the 2:12 class on a half-mile track. 

Hal B. Jr. was foaled in 1905. He is now twelve 
years old and has like (Goldsmith Maid and Tom 
Keeler trained on and improved with age. He made 
a winrace of 2:02% in 1913 and has done practically 
no racing on mile tracks since that date. As an evi- 
dence, however, that he was not raced to his limit 
on the mile tracks, he came back in 1916, and at 
York, Pa., acquired a half-mile track winrace of 
2:05%. He is, therefore, entitled to but three sec- 
onds allowance, the difference between his winraces 
on a mile and a half-mile track and three seconds for 



failing to equal or reduce his winrace in 1914, 1915, 
1916. In other words, in 1917 he is eligible to the 
2:06 class on a mile track and the 2:09 class on a 
half-mile track. Also if raced in 1917, if associations 
consider him too formidable, there is but one way to 
keep him out of the 2:09 classes on the half-mile 
tracks, and that is, by barring him in the published 
conditions just as Johnson was in the Grand Circuit 
in the early '80's and Peter Mac was at one or two 
meetings last season. He will then be required to 
start in the free-for-alls or go back to the mile tracks 
when, in the event of winning in 2:02% or better, he 
would forfeit his three seconds time allowance. 

Fred W. is a halfmile track pacer. He drops from 
tlie 2:09 class to the 2:11. Texas Jim has a winrace 
of 2:041^ made on a mile (rack in 1915, and 2:07% 
on a half-mile track. He is therefore entitled to but 
three .<ieconds lime allowance, as his half-mile track 
winrace comes within the four seconds limit. In 
addition to this he also is entitled to one second as 
he failed to equal or reduce his winrace last year. 
This makes him a 2:06 pacer on a mile track and a 
2 : 09 pacer on a half-mile track. 

Judge Ormonde has a winrace of 2:03%, made in 
1915 on a mile track, and 2:01% over a half-mile 
track in 1916. He is also entitled to one second time 
allowance for 1916 during which he failed to equal or 
reduce his winrace of 2:03%. He is therefore eligi- 
ble to the 2:05 class on a mile track and the 2:09 
class on a half-mile track in 1917. Aconite has a 
mile track winrace of 2: 07 14 made in 1915. While 
last year he acquired a half-mile winrace of 2:10'/i, 
he is, therefore, entitled to but three seconds under 
Rule 7, Section 5, while he is entitled to one second 
for failing to equal or reduce his winrace last season. 
He is now eligible to the 2:09 class on a mile track 
and the 2:12 class on a half-mile track. 

There is but two seconds difference between the 
mile and half-mile track winraces held by Ida May 
W. and, as she made both in 1914, she is entitled to 
two seconds time allowance and is eligible to the 
2:21 class on a mile track and the 2:23 class on a 
half-mile track. The returns for Add F show but 
one second difference between his mile and half- 
mile track wini'aces and as he made both in 1913 
he is entitled to three seconds allowance and in 1917 
can start in the 2:13 class on a mile track and the 
2:14 class cm a half-mile track. 

As the time allowance rule was presented to and 
adopted by the Joint Rule Committee at Columbus, 
Ohio, it is very simple and adapts itself to any case 
that may arise so long as the two time allowances — 
that is, the one granted by Rule 7, Section 5, and the 
one granted by Rule 7, Section 6 — are kept separate 
and distinct. When estimating time allowances it 
must always be borne in mind that the half-mile 
track winrace given in the list published in Volume 
32 of Wallace's Year Book is presented solely for the 
purpose of showing that the horses having same are 
not entitled to four seconds when entering on a half- 
mile track, but only the difference between the win- 
races made on a mile and a half-mile track. To this 
it is necessary to add the one second for each calen- 
dar year in which a horse has failed to equal or 
reduce his winrace as defined in Rule 2, Section 10; 
that is, the fastest time made by the winner in a 
public race or in an event in which he stood best in 
the summary. The latter is given to each horse 
because he is entitled to it and because it was ad- 
mitted when the rule was adopted that after a horse 
reaches his top form he goes back at least one second 
a year, and he retains that allowance until he can 
show by actual performance that he is again as good 
or better than he was on the day that he acquired 
his winrace. Among the older horses this will be 
very rare, although it will be the means of bringing 
back 10 the turf many horses that were considered 
outclassed until this rule was adopted. It will, how- 
ever, be an every day affair during tlie racing season 
in the younger division that was retired for a season 
or two, or even three seasons, to mature for breeding 
purposes or to recover from an injuiT. 

W. H. GOCHER, Sec'y. 


An Excellent Idea. 

Gordon H. True, of the Division of Animal Hus- 
bandry of the University Farm at Davis, has ad- 
dressed the following letter to the secretaries of all 
fair associations in California: 

"It has been planned that there shall be held at 
the University Fann the last week in May or the first 
of June what will be called Farmers' Week. At thi.s 
time it is planned to put on a program of practical 
talks and demonstrations to be participated in as far 
as possible by the stockmen of the state. All of the 
organizations interested in agriculture or the live- 
stock industry are being invited to meet here at that 
time and to participate in the meeting. 

"I have wondered if we could not secure, at this 
time, a meeting of the managers of the fair as.socia- 
tions of the state. I do not know whether there ia 
an organization of these associations or not, but my 
experience with such in the east suggests that a 
program of considerable profit might be carried out. 
I, therefore, take the lib(>rty of suggesting the calling 
such a meeting at the University Farm at the time 
named. 

"I would be very glad indeed to hear from you, 
telling what you think of the plan and suggesting 
topics which might come up for discussion at such 
a meeting. Yours very truly, 

"GORDON H. TRUE." 



4 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 10, 1917 



Harness Horses and Horsemen 



Leading Money Winners. 

The ten leading money winning trotters which 
have won races during the past seven years are: 

Peter Scott 2:0r)Vi by Peter the Great $56,210 

Dudie Archdale 2: OS ',4 by Archdale. . .|. . 47.488 
Peter Volo (4) 2:02 by Peter the Great.. 44,536 

Sonoma Girl 2:04>4 by Lynwood W 41,328 

Baden 2:05^4 by Bingara 40,085 

Mabel Trask 2:03'/, by Peter the Great. 36,795 
Spanish Queen 2:04V4 by Onward Silver.. 34,540 

Etawah 2:03 by Al Stanley 33.599 

R. T. C. 2:06% by Prince March 33,456 

Saint Frisco 2:03'/i by San Francisco... 31,875 
The ten leading money winning pacers that have 
won races since 1909 are the following: 

Hal Boy 2:01^^ by Hal B $49,809 

Earl Jr. 2:011^ by The Earl 40,314 

Frank Bogash Jr. l:59i, by Frank Bogash 37,700 
Directum I 1:56% by Directum Kelly... 33,225 

The Eel 2:021/^ by Gambolier 30,950 

Major Mallow 2:03% by Bo.x Elder 30,940 

Branham Baughman 2:04'/4 by Gambetta 

Wilkes 30,302 

.loe Patchen 11 2:02^^ by Joe Patchen 28,750 

Braden Direct 2:01% by Baron Direct... 26,485 

Hal B. Jr. 2:02\i. by Hal B 25,863 

In the above tables it will be seen that among the 
trotters no stallion has sired more than one of the 
ten except Peter the Great, who has sired three, and 
among the pacers Hal B., with two of the leading 
money winners to his credit, is the only horse to sire 
more than one. 

McKinney Stands Well in Front as a Sire. 

The greatness of McKinney 2:11 Vi as a progenitor 
of speed is not dimmed as the years go by. In the 
list of sires of standard performers he is fifth with 
203 to his credit. Peter the Great, Allerton, Gam- 
betta Wilkes, and Bingen are the only siFes that lead 
him in this list, and they have 286, 269, 235 and 218, 
respectively. 

In the list of sires of standard trotters he is fourth, 
with 162, Peter the Great with 241, Allerton with 209, 
and Bingen with 172 leading him. 

In the list of sires of 2:10 performers he is second, 
with Peter the Great the only sire to lead him. 
Peter the Great has sired 50, and McKinney 28 2:10 
performers. 

Among the sires of 2:10 trotters McKinney is third 
with Peter the Great again first, with 39, McKinney's 
son Zombro second, with 18, and McKinney himself 
third with 17. 

In the list of 2:10 pacers McKinney, with 11 to his 
credit, ties Ashland Wilkes and Peter the Great for 
eighth position, each having that number. 

Old Fashioned But Good Blood. 

Arthur Ivemington, reporter of the Supreme Court 
of the State of Washington, owns a little farm near 
Olympia whereon he has built a training track on 
soil that does not get muddy during the rainy season. 
This sounds rather fishy, but it is true, nevertheless. 
Mr. Remington is not a regular horse breeder as yet, 
having a few head of old-fashioned breeding that, as 
he says, "just happened." But his little farm is a 
gem and some day he hopes to put a few high class 
mares on it, as he can raise all the feed necessary 
for them. He has two mares that are very fine indi- 
viduals and make an ideal pole team that he thinks 
are not quite good enough for foundation stock, but 
any student of breeding would take a chance on get- 
ting good colts from them if they wore mated to a 
good horse. One mare is by the registered stallion 
Florida M. that is a producing sire ,and she is out of 
Birdie, dam of Irene 2:19Vi by Altamont, second dam 
Stella H. 2:29%, dam of McClosky Wainwright 
2: 21 '/J by Hambletonian Mambrino, sire of Carlyle 
Came 2: 11 14, third dam by Challenge 1698, a son of 
Sherman Black Hawk. The other member of Mr. 
Remingion's pole team is by Zombrook, a well bred 
son of the great Zombro, and is out of the same dam. 
With such blood as flows in the veins of these mares 
we think Mr. Remington would be fully justified in 
expecting something good from mating' tliciii with a 
good trotting bred stallion. 

Pop Geers Has a Birthday. 

Thursday, January 2."), was the sixty-sixth birthday 
of the Grand Old Man of the harness turf, Ed F. 
Geers, while next May he will also celebrate the 
forty-fifth anniversary of his connection with the 
sport as an active driver. As usual I'op Geers, the 
idol of the turf, received hundreds of congratulations 
from horsemen all over the country, who will be glad 
to learn that in spite of the two severe smashes he 
suffered from last summer he is now in fine health 
and not only in the training cart every day. weather 
permitting, but has resumed his younger days' prac- 
tice of winding up his daily work with a horseback 
ride. 

This birthday was no doubt of greater pleasure to 
Pop than in the past because he also celebrated the 
first event in which he ever drove a harness horse 
a mile faster than 2:00, namely Napoleon Direct 



1:59%, at the Columbus August meeting. Up to 1916 
his best trolling and pacing miles were 2:01 by The 
Harvester and 2:00% behind Ess H. Kay. His train- 
ing stable right now contains more high-class racing 
prospects than in many years past, and his hosts of 
friends wish him many more and happy days. — 
( Horse Jouraal. 

The Faster the Cheaper. 

Nothing truer was ever written than these words 
of Frank Trott, referring to the custom of giving 
the big purses to horses without reputation and all 
unknown to the r.ace-going public, which has for so 
lon.'r prevailed on the Grand Circuit: 

"Nothing has been given out anywhere along the 
line that tlie trotters whose names even thrill are 
to be looked after with substantial purses. 

"The Grand Circuit track manager figures that Cox 
will have Mabel Trask along, as Geers will have St. 
Frisco, and a $1200 purse will catch them. 

"That is the way the harness horse turf is gen- 
erally conducted, and it tells as no other thing can 
why harness horse racing has not attained its just 
measure of public approval." 

Mabel Trask and St. Frisco last season contrib- 
uted more to increase the popular interest in haniess 
racing than any ten trotters combined, and their re- 
ward is the practical obliteration of their earning 
capacity. They must race for $1000 or $1200 purses 
or stay in the barn, because trotting managers fail 
to appreciate their importance as gate-drawing at- 
tractions and fall back upon their stock reliance, the 
entrance fees. The available resources in extremely 
fast and widely known trotters, whose reputations 
are familiar to everybody who has an atom of inter- 
est in the harness sport, were never so large as at 
this time. A free-for-all would include among its 
competitors reigning sensations like Mabel Trask 
2:0314: Peter Mc 2:031,4; Lucile Spier 2:03»4; St. 
Frisco 2:03'4: Zomrect 2:03%; Volga 2:041/6; Mary 
Putney 2:04%; Peter Scott 2:05; M. L. J. 2:05'/i 
Dona Lona 2:05%, and others. A 2:05 class would 
attract all of the above except Mabel Trask, St. Fris- 
co and Zomrect, and also Peter McKlyo 2:06; The 
Exposer 2:06; Brisac 2:061^; Donna Clay 2: 06*4, 
Early Don 2: 06 14; Grand Chimes 2:061,4; Tramp- 
right 2:0614; Azora Axworthy 2:06%; Busy's Las- 
sie 2:06%, and seven or eight others with records 
faster than 2:07, all of whom were largely before the 
gaze of racegoers last season. And yet we are told 
that the M. and M. and the Charter Oak Purse are 
likely to be moved back to the 2:12 class, and other 
promoters of big purses will probably follow suit. 
The foreign war, through the fact that it is impos- 
sible to ship our horses abroad safely, has made fast, 
sensational racing matt^rial more abundant and avail- 
able to us than ever before and yet it is not to be 
utilized because trotting managers demand a big 
entry list to pay their purses. Mr. Trott is right 
when he says that it is this condition which tells 
why harness racing has not attained to its just meas- 
ure of public approvjil. — [Ti-otter and Pacer. 

The Little Red Horse. 

The following is from the Nashville, Tenu., Banner 
of January 5th: 

"Last Monday John R. Gentry 2:00V6 completed 
his twenty-eighth year in this land of the free, and 
during the day Mr. Rensselaer Weston, of Goshen, 
New York, journeyed out to Cumberland Park and 
jogged the grand old horse a couple of miles just to 
see if anything of the old spirit was left in him. 
There was, and Mr. Weston discovered it the mo- 
ment he gathered up the reins. The son of Ashland 
Wilkes was in a fine humor, seemed to realize that 
it was New Year's day, as well as his birthday, and 
without word from his driver, flew around the track 
like a frisky colt trying to show off before company. 
Evidently he remembered the day twenty years ago, 
when, on this same track, he and Robert J. raced 
each other to a head, and as he flew down the stretch 
with his ears working like a pair of shears, he 
seemed to be looking for his old rival. He was 
allowed to do just as he pleased, and brushed the 
last eighth like a house afire, clearly demonstrating 
his ability to hold his own in the best of company. 

"John R. Gentry was foaled in 1889, and his owner 
hoped he would die, so weak and puny did he appear. 
He wasn't bigger than a minute, and could not stand 
up. And yet he lived to be one of the greatest horses 
in the world, a champion in more ways tlian one, and 
universally voted the handsomest horse in the world. 
He was all that, and more, for it is to his credit that 
at one time or another he beat every great horse he 
ever met on the race track. He does not look half as 
old as he is, and every time Mr. Weston comes to 
Nashville to look him over and to see that he has all 
the horse comforts possible, he, too, seems to renew 
his youth and to take a more rosy view of the affairs 
of life. John R. Gentry's dam was a daughter of 
Wedgewood, who, twenty-five years ago, was the 
premier stallion at the old Hermitage stud. His 
sire, Ashland Wilkes, was sired by Red Wilkes, son 
of George Wilkes, and behind his Belmont cross that 
he gets through Wedgewood, his lineage traces to 
the warm blood of the thoroughbred." 



John Splan, the veteran horseman, who is in 
charge of breeding operations at Patchen Wilkes 
Farm, Lexington, writes that on the first of the year 
more mares were booked to the champion colt trot- 
ter, Peter Volo 2:02, than to his famous sire, Peter 
the Great, at that time of the year in any past season. 



PACIFIC BREEDERS' FUTURITY NO. 15. 

Forty-Four Two-Year-Olds Kept Eligible to This 
Stake by Payment on February 1st. 

There is a goodly field of two-year-olds eligible for 
the Pacific Breeders' Futurity this year as the follow- 
ing list of forty-four on which payments were made 
February 1st will show. From this 44 there should 
be good fields in both two-year-old divisions of this 
stake when it is raced at the Breeders' meeting this 
year. The eligibles are the following: 
E. T. Bamelte's b f by Carlokin, dam Zephyr by 
Zombro. 

I. L. Borden's b f by Major's By Guy, dam C. D. K.; 
b f by Ed. McKinney. dam Miss Nutwood by Nut- 
wood Wilkes. 

S. Christen.son's br c King Albert by The Bondsman, 
dam Reina Directum by Rey Direct. 

John N. Colomb's b f Mary McKinney by Vernon 
McKinney, dam Mary Gordon by Gordon. 

Chfis. Cook's b r Goldie McGregor by Onward Mc- 
Gregor, dam Gypsy C. by Nutwood Wilkes. 

S. H. Cowell's b) c by Panama, dam Harvest Queen 
by Silver Arrow; b c by Panama, dam Zaza by 
Henry Nutwood. 

Wm. C. DeRyder's b f Kilo Watts by General Watts, 
dam Miss Douglas by Cochato. 

Dr. Wm. Dodge's b c Bon Rex by Bon McKinney, 
dam Johanna R. by Limonero. 

Jas. F. Dunne's bl f Prieta by Tom Smith, dam Letter 
B. Jr. by Benton Boy; b f Viola Watts by Gen- 
eral Watts, dam Native Bidwell by The Native. 

V. K. Dunne's ch c The General Bond by General 
Watts, dam Bourbon Bond by The Bondsman. 

'\V. G. Durfee's ch f by Copa de Oro. dam Christianita 
by Zolock; b f by Carlokin. dam My Irene S. by 
Petigru; b f by Carlokin, dam Honey Healey by 
Zombro. 

E. A. Gammon's b c The Meteor by Peter McKlyo, 
dam Cleo Dillon by Sidney Dillon. 

Alex. Grant's br f Margaretta Lou by Wilbur Lou, 
dam Sona by McKinney. 

H. H. Helman's b c liaron Mowry by The Bondsman, 
dam Lady Mowry by McKinney. 

Heniet Slock Farm's ch c by Wilbur Lou, dam Eradi- 
ate by Geo. W. McKinney ; b c by Wilbur Lou, dam 
Fiesta Queen by On Stanley; b f Hemet Queen 
by Wilbur Lou, dam Hemet Girl by Geo. W. Mc- 
Kinney; ch f Edith Carter by Kinney de Lopez, 
dam Louise Carter by Chestnut Tom. 

H. A. Ilershey's b f Skye Ball by Jim Logan, dam by 
Falrose. 

Dan E. Hoffman's b f Onward McGregor, dam Bonnie 

Melba by Bon Guy. 
H. S. Hogoboom's ch f Beautiful Baby by Palo King, 

dam Beautiful Morn by Iran Alto. 
R. S. Irvine's b c Vannan by The Bondsman, dam 

The Bloom by Nushagak; b f Bonnetta by The 

Bondsman, dam Beretta by Searchlight. 
Abe W. Johnson's b c W. J. K. by Directum Penn, 

dam Belle Raymon by Raymon. 
Ed. Lavin's br c Eddie L. by George Hammett, dam 

Stella McKinney by Ed. McKinney. 
Wm. Loftus' b f by Copa de Oro, dam Leonor McKay 

by McKinney; b c by Copa de Oro, dam Annabelle 

L. by Hamb. Wilkes; b f by Carlokin, dam Iran 

Belle by Iran Alto. 
A. W. Longley's b c by Prince Ansel, dam Ella J. T. 

by Bob Mason. 
Carey Montgomery's b c Tennessee Bill by Jim Lo- 
gan, dam Lela H. L. by Nutwood Wilkes. 
Dr. M. F. Schaltenbrandt's b c Wm. McKinney by 

Scott McKinney, dam Kate by Antevolo. 
W. L. Scott's ch c Wilbur Lou 2d by Wilbur Lou, 

dam Lady You by Stanton Wilkes. 
W. L. Selman's br f Bess by Prince Zombro, dam 

Bessie Mack by Herman. 
T. D. Sexton's bl f by Vernon McKinney, dam by 

Oh So. 

J. E. Short's b c Tom Morris by Skidoo Wilkes, dam 

Honda Girl by Rubino. 
C. M. F. Stone's b f Harriet by Carlokin, dam Cora 

Jane by Del Coronado. 
L. H. Todhunter's foal by Peter McKlyo, dam Zom- 

bowyette by Zombro; foal by Peter McKlyo, dam 

by Osmuda by Bon Voyage. 
M. L. Woy's br c Strathalie Hall by Black Hall, dam 

Strathalie by Strathway. 

o 

One of the anomalies in the Denver show this year 
was the mare Alice E. N., a Kentucky standard bred, 
who won the first place in the roadster and trotting 
class. Although an ordinary street mare pulling a 
delivery wagon, Alice E. N. has twice won the Joslin 
cup as the best road horse in Colorado, and during 
her show career has earned more than $2,000 in 
prizes. She was foaled at Elmendorf in 1906 and is 
of the blood of Prodigal and Neonta, owned by J. B. 
Haggin. She was brought to Colorado when young 
and raised on the MacRose farm of Colonel George 
S. Newman near Denver. 

* * * 

The management of the mile track at Readville, 
Mass.. has announced a race meeting of five events, 
carrying $11,000 in purses, for July 4. The Amer- 
ican Trotting Derby for three-year-olds eligible to 
the 2:20 class will be for a purse of $3,000; the 
Massachusetts 2:08 trot and a free-for-all pace will 
have prizes of $2,500 each attached and the 2:14 
trot and 2:18 trot will be for $1500 each. The races 
will be decided in heats of one mile each, best two 
in three, with the entrance three per cent. 



Saturday, February 10, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



5 



Thoroughbred Matters 



The good horse Ed Cudihee. winner of the San 
Diego Business Men's Handicap at Tijuana in whicli 
race he defeated Geo. Winsfield's Slippery Elm and 
other good horses, was bred by Aaron Neale at Sun- 
nyside. Washington. Ed Cudihee is sired by Golf 
Ball, dam Purse Rose that was out of imported China 
Rose. Louise Miller, the nice filly now racing at 
Tijuana in Mr. Keal's colors, is a half sister to Ed 
Cudihee. Mr. Neal's great mare Purse Rose is at 
Mr. Geo. Wingfield's Nevada Stock Farm at Reno 
and is safe in foal to his fine stallion imported Honey- 
wood. The resultant, foal from this mating should be 
a valuable one. Ed Cudihee was named for Mr. 
Neal's long-time friend. Edward F. Cudihee. former 
sheriff of Kings county, Washington. 

4" 4* * 

It is probable that the Tijuana meeting will be ex- 
tended beyond the 100 days advertised. 

* * ♦ 

The abolition of the gelding allowance of three 
pounds, which is in effect on The Jockey Club 
tracks, was supported by many on the assumption 
that when a racehorse was broken down he would 
be worthless if a gelding, but more or less valuable 
if a stallion. Then again it was pointed out that in 
many cases like those of Roamer, Stromboli. Borrow, 
Boots and many other good ones ,the loss inflicted 
upon the liorse breeding industry was very material. 
But it now appears that the abolition of the gelding 
allowance has done little or nothing to reduce the 
number of geldings. 

* * * 

An epidemic of typhus fever brought the meeting 
at Juarez to an abrupt close and a consequent heavy 
loss to Price McKinuey and his associates of the 
Juarez Jockey Club. The rigid quarantine established 
against Juarez by El Paso came after the death of 
Dr. W. C. Kluttz (health officer of the Texas city), 
who was a victim of the disease. It was after his 
death that the mayor of El Paso established the 
quarantine. Under the quarantine no person may 
enter El Paso from Juarez, or any other point in 
Mexico, without the most rigid examination and dis- 
infection. 

* ❖ 4" 

Charles Scribner, the magazine and book publisher, 
having bought the bay stallion Uncas Chief, by Ben 
Strome out of. Passion Flower, has sent him to his 
farm at Far Hills, N. J., where he will be employed 
for the breeding of hunters and saddle horses. Uncas 
Chief is the last stallion son of Ben Strome, the sire 
of Highball, Roseben, and other good ones. Ben 
Strome was one of the largest and most impressive 
looking sons of Bend Or brought to this country. 

* * •i' 

While no move has been made as yet to allot dates 
for the eastern racing season of 1917, the Mai-yland 
Jockey Club, which operates the Pimlico track, has 
issued its list of stakes for the Spring meeting, which 
it is presumed will be held early in May. Entries 
will close on April 2 and large purses are offered for 
the chief events. The stakes announced are the 
Spring Juvenile, for two-year-olds, at four and one- 
half furlongs, with $2000 added; the Preakness for 
three-year-olds, with $.5000 added, at one mile and 
one-eighth; the Pimlico Spring Handicap, for three- 
year-olds and upward, with $2,500 added, one mile 
and seventy yards, and the Green Spring Valley 
Steeplechase Handicap, for four-year-olds and up- 
ward, with $2,000 added, two miles. No purse of less 
than $700 will be offered for overnight events. 

* * * 

There is every possibility that the three great 
classics — the Derby, the Oaks, and the St. Leger — 
will be restored to the coming season's calendar of 
English flat racing which commences this month. 
Strong appeals have been made by owners, trainers, 
and breeders to The Jockey Club, for it is felt espe- 
cially that the entries which have already been made 
for these races should be allowed to stand, as well 
as the conditions, and that the Ascot Gold Cup 
should also be revived under its original title. Of 
course, all four events will have to be run off at 
Newmarket, as their original values are not avail- 
able, but, after all, it is the names of the races and 
not the places at which they are decided that are of 
most significance and value to the all-important 
breeding industry. 

* * * 

The National Hunt Stewards have decided that the 
Grand National^ — the blue ribbon of the English 
steeplechase season — will be run off over the Gat- 
wick course on March 21. A number of fine entries 
have been received for this classic race, Including 
Ally Sloper, winner in 1915; Sumoch, who scored 
twelve months earlier, and Irish Mail. 

* * * 

That it pays to nominate a number of horses for 
an event such as the Futurity is shown by the an- 
nouncement that John E. Madden has transferred 
the entries of twenty-one nomins-tions for the Futu- 
rity of 1918 to Hal Price Headley. All these year- 
lin.gs are by Star Shoot. There are eleven colts and 
ten fillies. - • - 



Polymelus Most Successful Sire in England. 

Going to the suid when six years old, not as a 
classic winner, but as merely a well bred handicap 
horse, Polymelus is making a record as a sire in 
England that has not been equaled since the days of 
the great St. Simon, more than twenty years ago. 
Among his rivals in the stud were nearly a dozen 
winners of the Derby or the St. Leger, yet the horse 
wliose best performance was a win in the Cambrid.ge- 
shire Handicap, with 122 pounds up, has beaten them 
all by leading the list of winning sires three years in 
succession, which no other horse save St. Simon has 
done in a generation or more. 

That wonderful sire led the list four years in suc- 
cession and with his sons held the place of honor 
twelve years out of twenty-one before Polymelus 
came to the front in 1914. Persimmon, one of the 
sous of St. Simon, won the first place four times be- 
tween 1902 and 193 2, but no two years were to- 
gether. Cyllene, the sire of Polymelus, is the only 
horse that has topped the list two years in succes- 
sion since 1896. He was sold for export to South 
America at the height of his stud career, else he 
might now be outshining his best son in England. 

Polymelus is bred for the great stock horse he is 
proving to be. His sire got four Derby winners in 
eight years and he was a son of Bona Vista, whose 
sire. Ben d'Or, got the dam of Polymelus, was by 
Hampton, the sire of three Derby winners, out of 
Queen Victoria's famous old mare Quiver, by Toxoph- 
olite, that produced La Fleche and Memoir, fillies 
that in their respective years won both the Oaks and 
the St. Leger. 

Polymelus is fifteen years old. He was bred by 
Lord Crewe As a two-year-old he won three of the 
eight races in which he started. At three he ran 
eleven races, in all but four of which he was beaten, 
but he finished second to Challacombe in the St. 
Leger and second to St. Amant in the rich Jockey 
Club Stakes. He won the Cambridgeshire as a four- 
year-old and at five won the Princess of Wales 
Stakes, but was easily beaten by The White Knight 
for the Coronation Cup at Epsom. 

It was not until 1912 that a high class race horse 
by Polymelus appeared. In that year Maiden Erlegh 
ran second to Tracery in the St. Leger. Two years 
later Black Jester, by Polymelus, won the Doncaster 
classic from the largest field seen in fifty years, and 
in the same year Honeywood, by Polymelus, won the 
Cambridgeshire. Then came Corcyra, one of the best 
three-year-olds of 1914; Pommern, winner of the New 
Derby and St. Leger in 1915; Fifinella, winner of the 
New Derby and New Oaks last year, and Caunobie, 
the colt that beat the Caesarewitch winner, Sanc- 
tum, for the Jockey Club stakes, now the richest 
prize of the British turf. 

In the six years they have been running the off- 
spring of Polymelus have won $410,000, a large sum 
when it is considered that racing in England has 
fallen off to one-fifth its normal volume since the 
beginning of the war. The earnings of the family 
last year were $80,000 as compared with $48,000 for 
that of Chaucer; $44,000 for Sunstar; $.35,000 for 
Radium, $30,000 for Captivation, $26,000 for Orby, 
$26,000 for William the Third, $23,000 for Marcovil, 
$22,000 for Desmond, $22,000 for Spearmint and 
$21,000 for Bayardo. 

Of these eleven sires four are descended in the di- 
rect line from Ben d'Or, the Derby winner of 1880. 
When he was twenty-five years old he got Radium, 
the fourth horse on the list. His son Bona Vista got 
Cyllene, the sire of Polymelus and of Captivation, 
while Ormonde, another son, got Ornie, the sire of 
Orby. This line comes down from Eclipse through 
Stockwell, Birdcatcher and Sir Hercules, and is gen- 
erally known as a branch of the Stockwell family. 
But in spite of the fact that British breeders sold for 
export its greatest representatives, Ormonde, Flying 
Fox, Galtet More and Cyllene, the Ben d'Or branch 
at present overshadows all the other lines from 
Stockwell and Birdcatcher, whose best recent repre- 
sentatives were Rock Sand, Isinglass and (^allinule. 

Chaucer, Desmond and William the Third are sons 
of St. .Simon, whose daughter. Charm, produced Cap- 
tivation, an Irish sire that has come to the front witli 
a rush. Angelica, the full sister of St. Simon, pro- 
duced Orme, the sire of Orby. Galopin, the sire of 
both St. Simon and Angelica, got Donovan, the Derby 
winner of 1889, and the sire of Galliard, who got 
Black Duchess, the dam of Bayardo. Going back 
another generation. Vedette, the sire of Galopin, got 
Speculum, ."ire of Roseberry, sire of Amphion, sire 
of Sundridge, sire of Sunslar, so that eight of the 
eleven leading sires of 1916 are direct descendants 
of this horse Vedette, winner of the Two Thousand 
Guineas, in 1854, and of two Doncaster cups. 



Sixteen polo ponies, bred at Capt. W. H. McKit- 
trick's farm near liakersfield, were shipjx'd on tlie 
steamer Lurline to Honolulu last Tuesday for Walter 
Dillingham, one of the polo enthusiasts of the island 
territory. Dillingham will head a Honolulu team 
next year that has jilanned to make a tour of the 
United Slates, taid the McKittrick ponies, it was 
said, would be uskI as mounts. They will be given 
their first tryout n<>xt month in the polo tournament 
to be played at Honolulu. 

* * * 

During the four days of the New /calaiid cup 
meeting the sum of $878,485 passed through the 
totalisalors. We doubt if any such amount was ever 
wagered on a track in the United States in four days. 



Pioneer Mall-Messengers Before Pony Express. 

A long-delayed recognition has at last come to 
heroic pioneers who carried the mails to California 
for ten years before the famous "Pony Express" was 
established. 

Everyone knows the romantic story of the "Pony 
Express," but by a curious irony of fate the world 
had forgotten until now predecessors who for a 
decade faced every danger of nature and of hostile 
Indians to carry tlie mails across plains and moun- 
tains to California. This forgotten history has been 
recovered througli documents sent to the Califoniia 
Historical Survey Commission, at its headquarters 
at the University of Califoniia, by H. Chorpenning 
McKee of Berkeley. 

Discovery has been made by Owen C. Coy. Secre- 
tary of the (Commission, through examination of these 
docuinen's, that as early as April 25, 1851. nearly 
ten years before the "Pony Express" was started, 
the United States contracted with George Chorpen- 
ning and Absalom Woodward to pay $14,000 a year 
to have the mail carried once each month between 
Salt Lake and .Sacramento. The contractors agreed 
to make the 910-mile journey in not more than thirty 
days. The original route was along the regular emi- 
grant road through Placerville, crossing the Sierras 
at Carson's Canyon, then following along the Carson 
and Humboldt rivers and around the northern end 
of Great Salt Lake. In the first journey across the 
mountains it took at times a whole day to make two 
miles through the snow. Before the end of the first 
year. Woodward was killed by Indians, near Great 
Salt Lake. Winter proved the northern route im- 
practicable, so, aiter an unsatisfactory trial of the 
Feather-river route, Chorpenning changed the winter 
route so that the mails went from Salt Lake to San 
Pedro and thence on a Panama mail steamer to San 
Francisco. By 1858 the quantity of mail to be car- 
ried increased so much — and also the government 
remuneration — that Chorpenning was able to run a 
stage-line of four-horse coaches along the mail route. 
A new route was discovered, south of Gieat Salt 
Lake, which shortened the journey a hundred miles. 

The very idea of the "Pony Express" was antici- 
pated by Major Chorpenning, for in December, 1858, 
when the President's Message was about to be is- 
sued, Chorpenning placed a fresh horse at each mail 
station from Salt Lake to California, and Sacramento 
read President Buchanan's second annual message 
only seventeen days after it had been delivered to 
Congress. This was two years before Russell and 
Company established the famous "Pony Express." 

Californians who read a ("hicago newspaper only 
three days old, or who look out over the desi-rt from 
a dining-car table, little realize the dangers and dil- 
ficulties of these long-forgotten pioneer mail con- 
tractors. During the ten years Major Chorpenning 
was engaged in this service, says Mr. Coy, he lost 
at the hands of the Indians nearly three hundred 
head of horses and mules and many coaches, wagons 
and station buildings, and sixteen of his brave mes- 
sengers were slain by the Indians. 

o 

The English Government has notified the Irish 
Turf Club that, in the interests of the State, the 
number of days of racing in Ireland during this year 
must be reduced considerably. Since the railways 
were taken over by the Government pleasure traffic 
of all description has been discontinued. Tliorough- 
bred horsebreeding is one of the most important and 
remunerative industries in Ireland, more than 100,000 
horses having been exported from the Emerald Isle 
for war purposes. 

* * ♦ 

The new regulation which prohibits the English 
railways from conveying horses to race meetings 
has not interfered with the steeplechase season in 
any way. A service ol motor v* hides has been in- 
stalled from the training stables to the various race- 
courses. 

o 

Stayers Descended From Roarers. 

If roaring is hereditary, as was asserted in 1891 by 
the prominent bre(-ders and owners who oDject(>d to 
the return of Ormonde, it is indeed strange that the 
taint has not disclosed itself in his descendants. Mel- 
bourne and Macaroni were roarers, but the present- 
day line of Melbourne, via West Australian, Solon, 
Barcaldine and Marco, has given us not roarers, but, 
on the other hand, such excellent stayers as Beppo. 
Mark Time and others of less note, together with 
brilliant horses at from a mile to a mile and a quar- 
ter or thei'eabouts, in Neil Gow, Marcovil, Sansovino, 
Malua, etc. Similarly the Wolf's (^rag branch of 
Barcaldine has produced good stayers in Karakoul, 
War Wolf and Bellivor Tor, while Manwolf, Catty 
Crag, Dumbarton Castle, Linacre (now a successful 
sire in Australia) are only a few of the other sons 
of Wolf's Crag that have been prominent winners. 
Then, as to Macaroni, mares by him have been of 
inestimable value. Both Kendal and Ormonde were 
out of daughters of Macaroni out of mares of the 
Agnes family. — [London Sportsman. 

o 

One never hears of trouble or dissatisfaction over 
the conditions of selling races In England, such as 
is common at almost every race meeting on this side 
of the Atlantic. Th(? difference seems to be, not in 
the conditions, but in (he attitude of owners, who. in 
America, want the opportunities without any conse- 
((uent responsibilities. In England horses are put 
into selling races to be sold, which is the last thing 
in the minds of owners on this side. 



6 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



[Saturday, February 10, 1917 




DENVER'S GREATEST HORSE SHOW. 



Six young women of the Young Women's Chris- 
tian Association, of Fresno, have recently fostered 
a horseback club. They made their first ride Satur- 
day to Kearney park and return. Many like trips 
will be taken other Saturdays. It is expected that 
the club will be considerably enlarged within a 
short time. The club has been organized under the 
supervision of the physical director, Miss Alice Leh- 
man. 

* * * 

Scottie Moore McDonald, advertised for sale in 
this issue by J. R. Hodge, of Laddonia, Mo., is one 
of the best saddle horse sires in Missouri and has 
been greatly admired by many noted horsemen. He 
is sired by Rex McDonald and his dam is by Kentucky 
Cavalier 403. He was first prize three-year-old stal- 
lion at the Iowa and Minnesota State Fairs and has 
been a big winner at Missouri county fairs. 

* + + 

The owners of good breeding horses in Missouri 
are lining up for the Stallion Registration Uiw, which 
was recently introduced by Representative R. T. 
Gordon, of Liberty, Mo., himself a well informed 
breeder. The bill is an improved form over many 
stallion laws now in effect in other states and has 
the endorsement of progressive horsemen of the 
state who hope for its adoption. 

* * * 

Sixteen Polo ponies, representing the best blood in 
California, were shipped to Honolulu last week. They 
are from Captain \V. H. McKittrick's farm at Bakors- 
fieUl and are consigned to Walter Dillingham. 

* * * 

Mrs. Adelaide Gillis McCormick, of Los Angeles, 
has sent her celebrated matron. Undine, by Chester 
Dare 10, and the dam of many winners, to the court 
of Mont-^omery Chief, the premier sire at the head 
of Ball Bros.' farm, Versailles, Ky. Montgomery 
Chief is the sire of as many champion saddle horses 
of the present day shows as any living stallion and 
the cross with the beautiful daughter of Chester 
Dare will be watched with interest. 

* * * 

Missourians are indeed proud of the fact that Gov- 
ernor Gardner's inclinations are of the most demo- 
cratic nature. He gets to the Executive office early 
in the morning, doffs his coat and goes at his impor- 
tant duties in his shirt-sleeves. After his day's work, 
and in the late afternoon, he mounts a good Missouri 
saddle horse and forgets the worries of his impor- 
tant position in an exhilarating, healthful and pleas- 
ant hour spent on his horse along the highways of 
Cole county As often as her household and social 
duties will permit, the Governor's estimable wife 
joins him on these pleasant excursions for, like her 
distinguished husband, Mrs. Gardner is a great lover 
of the noble equine and is a thorough and capable 
horsewoman. With the Governor and Mrs. Gardner 
setting this splendid example those high in official 
life at our State capital are rapidly following suit 
and it may be expected that with the coming of 
spring and summer many of the Jefferson City elite 
will be improving health and morals by daily jaunty 
to the countryside horseback. 

* * * 

Jas. A. Houchin, of Jefferson City, Mo., is of the 
same opinion as the Breeder and Sportsman, as re- 
gards horse shows in California, and in a letter to 
the writer, declares that the horse show stables of 
Missouri and Kentucky will rally to the call and give 
their support to the West. He also suggests a circuit 
of big shows regarding which he makes the following 
comment: "I talked horse shows when I judged at 
Salem, Ore., last year and I have no doubt, in fact I 
know, those people up there are anxious to get in a 
horse show circuit. A show at Denver, Salem, San 
Francisco. Los Angeles, Kl Paso and up to Fort 
Worth, would certainly be a "stem winder" and would 
attract the leading stables of this section. Once they 
give a properly conducted horse show, the future of 
the shows in those places will be assured. If we 
can find a winning gelding and mare this year our 
stable will be in the midst of the fray from the tap 
of the first bell. Astral King is in his prime and 
we have some youngsters coming on that can win. 
Whether we show or not I would like to see the cir- 
cus started and we will come in time." 



[Written for the Breeder and Sportsman 
by "Looker On."] 

"Number Four!" the clarion voice of Superintend- 
ent Harry Youngermman echoed through the great 
building, and the multitude that had sat spellbound 
throughout the high jump broke into deafening 
cheers as the splendid chestnut gelding, Great Heart, 
owned by the Mayslake stables Chicago and ridden 
by Fred Veasey, trotted out for the blue ribbon; 
twenty minutes later taps were sounded and the 
lights were turned out, and the 1917 performance of 
the National Western Horse Show, at Denver, Colo., 
passed into equine history upon whose golden pages 
there will be no more alluring story. 

From its inception the Denver show of 1917, which 
is the forerunner of all live stock exhibitions, was 
particularly fortunate. Fortunate in the selection of 
the men who guided its destinies; fortunate in the 
quanaity and quality of its entries; fortunate in the 
prosperity in evidence on every hand, and last of all, 
fortunate in being favored with w-eather such as 
Colorado alone can at times produce. All these 
things and more contributed toward the success of 
the show and resulted in an attendance which, at the 
entire eight performances, taxed the seating capac- 
ity of the stock yards coliseum. Seats at all times 
were at a premium and the promenade was thronged 
with people who divided their attention between 
Denver's gaily clad Four Hundred and the blue 
bloods of the arena. Society was out in force, and 
when Denver smiles the whole world stands aside. 

Fred P. Johnson, long identified with the live stock 
interests of the West and promoter of previous exhi- 
bitions, was ably assisted by Robt. R. Boyce, who 
acted as secretary of the horse show. R. P. Shollen- 
berger v,as retained as Ring secretary and the only 
Harry L. Youngerman, whose friends are legion and 
whose efficiency and popularity are the subject of 

much comment, handled the show as master of cere 




MISS LOULA LONG, 
America's Most Noted Exhibitor of Horses, Who 
Revived Her Usual Success at the Denver Horse 
Show. 



monies; and be it said, to his credit, that there was 
not an idle moment or a lull in the entertainment 
during the week. 

Mr. D. Schilling, known to every one as a breeder, 
owner, exhibitor and all-around horseman, acted as 
chainnan of the Directing Committee. He was as 
usual untiring in his efforts to serve the best inter- 
ests of the show and please its patrons. One can 
always avoid criticism by saying nothing, doing noth- 
ing and being nothing, but such an individual has no 
place in the show ring. His determination to get 
impartial results regardless of ownership was com- 
mendable, and his selection was a happy one. He 
was ably assisted by Mr. Bruce G. Easton, a well 
known breeder of saddle horses, and Mr. J. A. Osner, 
prince of good fellows, of Denver. 

The ribbons were tied by W. S. Roberts of Lexing- 
ton, Ky., James Lockridge of Fayette, Mo., and Wal- 
ter Palmer of Ottawa, 111. Their decisions were 
reniered with a promptness that implied proficiency 
and were well received. 

Capt. Louie Verdier of the French army judged all 
hunters in a satl;^factory manner. 

The ceremonies were opened on Monday night 
with a class for trotters with records, which was 
won by the veteran stallion Tommy Doyle, from the 
stable of Geo. J. Peake, Winchester, 111. Britton 
Forbes, heralded as a champion, was placed second; 
his speed was terrific but he became erratic as the 
show progressed and lost all chance of winning. 
Homer AUerton, well shown by Tom Bass, was third 
and Tommy Piper fourth. 

High stepping pairs revealed entries from the sta- 
bles of John R. Thompson, Miss Loula Long (two 
en*ries), and O. J. Mooers. Ribbons were awarded in 
the order namedl First going to Pride & Oakwood, 



second to Revelation and Reputation, third to Fascin- 
ation and Flirtation, and fourth to Pick of the Basket 
and Adora. 

Ladies' saddle horses, three-gaited, was won by 
John R. Thompson's Nancy Walker, ridden by the 
charming little daughter of the restaurant magnate. 
Lady Fascination, of the Mayslake stables, was 
placed second, Cathryn Countiss third, and Chloe 
Malone fourth. 

Heavy Harness horses, 15.2 and over, resulted in 
one of the best contests of the entire week. John 
R. Thompson's bay gelding. Sir Edward, evidently in 
marvelous form and faultlessly shown by Ed. White, 
finally won from Miss Long's Reputation, Mr. 
Thomp.son's Lord Brilliant and Miss Long's Exclama- 
tion. 

Five-gaited saddle mares developed into a battle 
royal between Miss Long's Joan Sawyer, Mr. Eaton's 
Princess Eugenia and Mr. Davis' Helen Hicklin, 
placed as named. Mr. Eaton's mare was always the 
favorite with the crowd and the judges were nearly 
stampeded as the audience shouted its approval. 
Fomi was thrown to the four winds by most of the 
riders and at every call for a different gait a free- 
for-all race resulted, Willie McDonald, ridden by 
Bass, showing astonishing speed at the trot and 
Helen Hicklin racking out from under Roy Davis in 
a startling manner. 

Ebony girl and Lovely Lady annexed another blue 
for the Thompson stable in the tandem over 14.2 and 
under 15.2; second going to O. J. Mooers with Pick 
of Basket and Adora and third to Honey Girl and 
Southerner, the local entry of J. M. Kuykendall. 

Heavy harness horses, single, under 15.2, produced 
four splendid mares and was finally won by Miss 
Long's Realization, with O. J. Mooers' The Spring 
Maid the real contender, 2nd; Mr. Thompson's 
Ix)vey Lady was third and Miss Long's Fascination 
fourth. 

Tommy Doyle, minus the master hand of the sage 
of Winchester and as nearly guideless as a horse 
could be. received fourth place in a class for road- 
sters single, Miss Long's Aspiration and Anticipation 
being placed first and second, respectively, and the 
gray mare Miss Beulah, "the idol of the gallery," 
third. 

My Major Dare was withdrawn from the stallion 
class for five-gaited horses of any age. at the request 
of the management, and Beauchamp, from the stable 
of Blades & Holeman, simply tramped on the remain- 
der of a very good field. Mr. J. A. Osner's bay coll 
Mary's Artist made his first show, and, destined for 
future honors, was awarded the red ribbon. D. Schil- 
ling's Noble Rex was third and Tom Bass with 
Sulton Star fourth. 

Miss Marie Eaton and Don Reavis, faultlessly 
mounted, made a strikingly beautiful picture as they 
cantered to victory in the class for pair of riders. 

Ray Davis and Mrs. Holman were second and Miss 
Daly and Mr. Fitzell third. 

The riding of Miss Marie Eaton in the class for 
Girl riders under 18 years was one of the notably 
iirtistic events of the week. Princess Eugenia was 
in splendid form and never responded to professional 
hands as she did to the magic touch of the Miss 
from Eaton farm. Scarcely less proficient was the 
work of Miss Florence Flick, Miss Barbara Petrikin 
and Miss Louise Tebeau, who caught the judge's eye 
as named. 

On Wednesday night Lord Brilliant won the Gig 
class from a field which did not tax his ability. Mrs. 
Holman won the Ladies' cross saddle class, and Miss 
Long's dainty black mare again took the roadsters 
into camp. 

The appointment class for Ladies' horses, single, 
was won by Miss Long's Realization, with her Com- 
bination second. The three-gaited event went to 
Nancy ^^■alke^, and Revelation and Reputation won 
the pair class for horses over 15.2, 

Alice E. N. won a second leg on the Joslin Dry 
Goods challenge cup which has been the subject of 
local rivalry for five years. 

Miss Beulah, the Annette KoUerman of the horse 
world, was all the judges could see in the class for 
ladies" saddle horses owned in Colorado, and Walter 
Burcher, who has had the winning habit for years, 
carried away the blue in the class for boy riders. 

H. Rasmusson won the Sporting tandem event in 
record breaking manner. 

The $1,000 Colorado stake for five-gaited saddle 
horses was the magnet which drew an audience that 
packed the house to the rafters on Thursday evening. 
Eight entries responded to the bugle and enter- 
tained the responsive audience for thirty minutes as 
perhaps no show has done before. Brilliant as has 
been the career of My Major Dare and great as has 
been his prestige, it is doubtful if he has ever en- 
tered the ring in more superb form or staged a more 
dazzling performance. It was a foregone conclusion 
that he would win and he was not extended but for 
an instant at each gait, but it was the opinion of 
those who know him best that he is right now at 
the zenith of his achievements, and stands unquali- 
fiedly the peer of all living saddle stallions. 

Beauchamp, well ridden by Dell Holeman, was an 
easy second, and is, in the writer's opinion, a com- 
ing champion. Adelaid Jeanette, formerly The Deco- 
ration Lady, was placed third; Princess Eugenie 
fourth; Helen Hecklin fifth, and Marj-'s Artist sixth. 

One of the really sensational thingc of the show 



(Continued on Page 7, Column 3.) 



I II i M MM MMMKH iiiiiM Mii MM ii i yi nno mnt ii M ii iii i M Wi iiiiiiiiii i iiiillWMMl l llil l lllll l ll l lllNNIIWNIIw noni MW nnflll^ 



Saturday, February 10, 1917.] 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 



Notes and News 



The New England Trotting Horsemen's Convention 
will be held in Boston today and 500 are expected to 
be present. 

* * * 

The Lake Erie Circuit offers racing over half mile 
tracks this year from the first week in June until 
the last week in October. 

* * ♦ 

The green trotter Joe Matthews by Kentucky Todd 
that is in J. B. Stetson's string at Sacramento can 
2:20 right now and looks like one of the good trotters 
for 1917. 

* ♦ ♦ 

Read Secretary Gocher's article on "Winraces and 
Time Allowances" on page 3 and you will be able 
to figure out exactly the class to which your horse 
is eligible this year. It is a timely article. 

* ♦ * 

Sixteen two-year-olds, 80 three-year-olds and 114 
four-year-olds have trotted to records of 2:10 or 
better. Two two-year-olds, three three-year-olds and 
five foui'-year-olds have trotting records below 2:05. 

* 4" ♦ 

The stallion Zomblack 2:14i4, bred by James W. 
Marshall of Dixon, and now owned by R. J. MacKen- 
zie, is making a season in the stud at Palatine, Illi- 
nois, where he is in charge of Charles ("Red") 
McDonald. 

4" ♦ * 

It is said that some of the associations are throw- 
ing fits over the new mandatory rule which awards 
all the moneys to a hor.se distancing the field, and 
predictions are already being made that they will 
insist on its being rescinded next year. 

* * 4* 

Cornelius J. Griffin, who was well known in Cali- 
fornia as a trainer of race horses, and who was a 
familiar figure at Emeryville and Ingleside years 
ago, died at his home in Martinez this week, aged 
79 years. He was a native of Canada. 

* 4' * 

Of the 34 stallions that are sires of more than 100 
standard performers, but six are living. They are 
Peter the Great 2:01 V^, sire of 286; McKinney 2:11^4, 
sire of 203; Axworthy (3) 2:15i4, sire of 152; Moko, 
sire of 143; Bingara sire of 125, and Walnut Hall 
2:081^, sire of 117. 

4* ^ 4* 

Bon Watts, James Thompson's son of Gen. Watts, 
is now a three-year-old and a better looking colt it 
would be hard to find. Thompson has him at the 
Sacramento track and is only giving him exercise at 
present. 

4" 4* 4" 

A payment of $10 will be due and payable on 
Thiirsday, March 1st, on all three-year-olds that are 
still eligible to Pacific Breeders' Futurity No. 14, 
which stake has a total value of $7,250, and which is 
to be raced for this year at the Breeders' meeting. 
4» 4" 4* 

Mai-ysville wiU almost certainly be on the Califor- 
nia circuit this season. J. E. Strain of that city and 
other enterprising stock men have already taken the 
matter up and will soon get to work to organize and 
get a guarantee fund for a good fair and race 
meeting. 

4* 4* ^ 

Joseph Waddell, secretary of the California Fair 
and Racing Association, took a look at L. H. Tod- 
hunter's stallion Peter McKlyo 2:06 for the first time 
last week and pronounced him one of the best look- 
ing stallions he had seen in many a day, and Joseph 
has seen "quite a few" during his lifetime. 

4* 4* 4* 

The sale of the Billings horses will undoubtedly 
occur some time next fall — if not sold as a whole in 
the meantime — and will take place either at Lexing- 
ton during the October "trots" at Curies Neck Farm, 
or in New York City, Uhlan 1:58 and Lou Dillon 
1:58^ being the only two that Mr. Billings will 
reserve. 

4* 4" 4» 

Lou Dillon 1:58%, the trotting queen, is 19 years 
old, has been bred 11 times, has produced eight foals, 
seven of which are living. Her latest foal, a filly, 
came Januaiy 11 and is by The Harvester 2:01. 
Three of her produce are in the 2:10 list and five 
have taken standard records. One of her daughters 
is the dam of a standard performer. 

4- 4- 4- 

George Ryan has in training at the Pleasanton 
track a handsome three-year-old colt by Flosnut, dam 
by Dillcara. Considering the short time the colt has 
been taken up, he is showing remarkably well. Any- 
one looking for a promising three-year-old would do 
well to see this colt as the owner will be pleased to 
dispose of him to someone who would develop him. 
41 41 4. 

Lou Mativia has four head in training at the Dixon 
half mile track. The six-year-old stallion Healini 
56150 is showing up well and acts like a real trotter. 
He has no record. Others in his string are two four- 
year-olds by Logan Pointer, a four-year-old mare by 
Alton, and a three-year-old by Logan Pointer. 



The Chicago Breeders' Gazette of last week says 
that owing to scarcity of heavy steers heavy cows 
are being substituted in kosher trade and are selling 
at the high point of the season .anywhere from $9.25 
to $10 being paid.